Keep money in mind when choosing a pet

Keep money in mind when choosing a pet

There are 15 comments on the Public Opinion story from Mar 1, 2009, titled Keep money in mind when choosing a pet. In it, Public Opinion reports that:

Pets can be costly, both to obtain and to keep. While some dogs are free or almost free, registered dogs and so-called "designer" breeds usually start at about $500 and can run well over $1,000. That is just ...

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Speaking The Truth

Gettysburg, PA

#1 Mar 1, 2009
....and never, never, never buy your pet from a pet store! The animals that are sold from pet stores, even local ones, come from questionable breeding backgrounds (i.e., puppy mills, backyard breeders, etc....) and more often than not, come with a whole history of ailments that will prove extremely costly. Pet adoption days from PetSmart or the kittens and bunnies at Franklin Hardware are about the only exceptions and that's because those animals were given to them by people who didn't intend for their animals to give birth and not bred specifically for sale through a local pet store.
dog lover

AOL

#2 Mar 1, 2009
Please bear in mind that if your beloved pet should become ill-diabtes, cancer, any other chronic illness, there are additional medical expenses and care requirements. TO what degree are you prepared to provide this? A pet is a committment that should not be taken lightly. There is health insurance available for pets. Not many people are aware of this, or they don't think of it until the pet becomes ill.
onewhoknows

Wilmington, DE

#3 Mar 1, 2009
Speaking The Truth wrote:
Pet adoption days from PetSmart or the kittens and bunnies at Franklin Hardware are about the only exceptions and that's because those animals were given to them by people who didn't intend for their animals to give birth and not bred specifically for sale through a local pet store.
So what you are saying is that people's pets that breed by mistake have better quality pets???
People who breed animals for money are not all "puppy mill" breeders. Even the larger breeders. It is not fare to group everyone together. There are good breeders and bad breeders. If a business sells dogs and buys from good breeders then what is wrong with that? Just because a pet store sells dogs it does not mean they are poor quality animals. There is good and bad to everything and sadly many people have a glasses that are half empty and never consider the glass might be half full.
Jen

Whitesboro, NY

#4 Mar 1, 2009
I 100% agree with yous and because of people arent aware of the cost after they become ill thats why half of them get surrendered to the shelters,and for other reasons they dont realize that the breed there getting is gonna get that big then when they get to be about 1 or 2 they surrender them to if yous dont know how big your doggie gonna get research them first find out diffrent information this way you can pick the best breed for you.dogs and other animals are not things when you get bored you can just throw away when your bored they have feelings to once they come into your life they should become part of your familey.and always,always get your pet neutered and spayed theres to many animals in this world as it is and most are homeless and need a home please do not add to the over population.heres my website myspace.com/shelteranimals after looking at my website hopefully some of yous would be more responsible,or if yous would rather adopt i have alot of information on my page on how you would adopt.they have puppies,and diffrent kind of breeds to and all there looking for is love and want a forever home.
faeryedark

South Plainfield, NJ

#5 Mar 1, 2009
Wow! "litter $6-$10" Ever heard of a coupon? How about stockpiling? Ya know buying extraa when it's on a good sale (w/ coupon) so you don't have to buy it again till it's on sale again?
Really a no brainer. I was just "paid" to buy 2 bags of Friskies using 2 coupons (for $3.50 off each) the bags were $3.53 and then I got a register coupon for $1 off my next order.
With the money I save, I can afford the vet bills and shots, toys, etc.
A person can google couponing boards and come up w/ dozen different free sites Fatwallet, Slickdeals, Hotcouponworld are a few.
Heck, if ya just don't have the time you can go to the dollar tree and get litter, and food, and butter dish works just fine...so do basins for litter pans.
I Feel Your Pain

Landisburg, PA

#6 Mar 1, 2009
One BIG fallacy in this article is that bettas do well in dirty fishbowls. Bettas are a TROPICAL fish, and are most healthy in water from 76 to 80 degrees F, which you can't maintain without a heater in any container.

The other thing the paper needs to do is define the difference between a RESPONSIBLE breeder, and just some schmoe who breeds dogs. A responsible breeder will:

1) be breeding to the breed's standard..no teacup, micro, mini, imperial,
king, or other goofy term for runts or oversized dogs. No intentional
"rare", meaning unaccepted by the breed standard, colors either.

2) will be actively showing or working the parents.

3) will have genetic health testing done, such as OFA or PennHip, CERF,
VonWillebrand's, etc.

4) will give you the results of that testing in writing

5) insists on spay/neuter for pet pups.

6) has a contract citing the spay/neuter clause and also offering to take
back the pup at any time for any reason for the rest of its life.

7) is open, honest, and available to the new owner, and can talk about their
breed for hours.

8) does a home check before placing a pup, and will turn down homes that
might not be suitable for a pup of their breed.

9) does not put money above the well-being of their animals.

If the breeder you are considering doesn't fit these guidelines, find a
better breeder. You are more likely to get a mentally and physically
healthy pup from a responsible breeder.
BTravasos

Rayne, LA

#7 Mar 1, 2009
I hate to even mention this as I'm not a negative person by nature, but when adopting/getting a pet, always think "worse case scenario" as far as costs involved. You can obtain a perfectly healthy pet and things can go wrong, and pets can be quite costly. I am speaking based on experience. I would suggest that one have a "pet savings account" set aside for expenses. We have several cats of which most are exotic breeds. We also have two short haired domestic cats. We have spent in excess of thousands of dollars on our animals for vet visits, shots, grooming, etc. I am a Persian cat lover and I see many people wanting Persian's because they are cute and loving, which they are, but they require regular grooming. Grooming is very time consuming or costly if you have a groomer groom them, and if they are allowed to get matted, the mats can actually cause skin irritation and infection. Please, consider all of the above when thinking about pets. This is the reason many end up in shelters and it's really sad.
pet owner

Carlisle, PA

#8 Mar 1, 2009
$80 microchip. That is nuts. Wonder what vet charges that.

Go to CVAS and get your pets chipped for $25.

Look into low cost spay/neuter programs. Snap and Paws.

Rabies clinics. One is held in Biglerville every April/Sept.

Dogs don't need to eat a $50 bag of dog food either.(Yes I used to feed the "high quality" stuff)
We now get food from Tractor Supply 50lbs $20. My dogs look better.

People need to think about the breed they are getting. How much grooming it's gonna take. If they want to groom themselves or pay someone.
Smoke and Sunshine

United States

#9 Mar 1, 2009
Dog-wise a mutt is the way to go. Less health problems. All pure breds have inherent disorders that go with them. Just look at the AKC web site. It will tell you what problems are common in certain breeds.
Concerned Pet Owner

Mountain View, AR

#10 Mar 1, 2009
Small furry animals such as hamsters, gerbils, rabbits and guinea pigs can be good, inexpensive choices...

I have to disagree with this statement. Guinea pigs and rabbits are not inexpensive animals. They require large cages, proper food, bedding, unlimited hay, daily vegetables and vet care when needed. The cost of keeping guinea pigs is much higher than keeping a dog or cat. Petstore cages are inadequate for both these types of animals because they need plenty of room to exercise. C&C (cubes & coroplast) cages are inexpensive to build and provide adequate space.

Buying animals from petstores while there is a huge overpopulation problem in most species is not a good thing to do. There isn't just an overpopulation problem with dogs and cats, but with guinea pigs, rabbits, and many other small animals. Why buy when shelter animals die.
Jen

Whitesboro, NY

#12 Mar 2, 2009
Concerned Pet Owner wrote:
Small furry animals such as hamsters, gerbils, rabbits and guinea pigs can be good, inexpensive choices...
I have to disagree with this statement. Guinea pigs and rabbits are not inexpensive animals. They require large cages, proper food, bedding, unlimited hay, daily vegetables and vet care when needed. The cost of keeping guinea pigs is much higher than keeping a dog or cat. Petstore cages are inadequate for both these types of animals because they need plenty of room to exercise. C&C (cubes & coroplast) cages are inexpensive to build and provide adequate space.
Buying animals from petstores while there is a huge overpopulation problem in most species is not a good thing to do. There isn't just an overpopulation problem with dogs and cats, but with guinea pigs, rabbits, and many other small animals. Why buy when shelter animals die.
I have to agree with you,on both. every animal doesnt matter is over population in the spca they have all the small animals to up for adoption because people think there easy to take care of and there not so they send them to shelters.I have a chinchilla and i'll tell ya from experience she is expensive me and my husband rescued her if we didnt she was gonna end up at a lab getting killed for her ears it was really sad so we took her.she is such a sweet chinchilla we had to work with her because at first she wasnt used to people and was really scared and at times was nasty,but its been 2 years and shes really sweet now. our cage for her was $120.00 that was on sale it's a mansion 4 levels but they love to jump and play so they need alot of room.her food for a small bag of chinchilla food $10.00 and i'll tell ya it adds up,container for her bath was about $8.00 and the sand for her bath because you cant give them a regular bath it has to be sand about $8.00 that adds up. plus all the accessories $60.00 thats her tunnel,toys...etc.
Jen

Whitesboro, NY

#13 Mar 2, 2009
onewhoknows wrote:
<quoted text>
So what you are saying is that people's pets that breed by mistake have better quality pets???
People who breed animals for money are not all "puppy mill" breeders. Even the larger breeders. It is not fare to group everyone together. There are good breeders and bad breeders. If a business sells dogs and buys from good breeders then what is wrong with that? Just because a pet store sells dogs it does not mean they are poor quality animals. There is good and bad to everything and sadly many people have a glasses that are half empty and never consider the glass might be half full.
the people who's animals get pregnant on accident is called a irresponsable pet owner there is one solution to that get your animal spayed and neutered and that wont happen they even make it easy for people now they have good vets now spaying and neutering for low income famileys so that these animals arent having anymore babies.all they have to do is open a phone book and start calling vets and they will help them and if they cant even do that then there a lazy irresponable pet owner who shouldnt have a pet.and dont get me started on breeders i dont care if there good or bad breeders,do people not realize what goes on at animal shelters how many animals that just need a loveing home.if everybody would go to there local shelters and get 1 animal it would stop the overpopulation with animals because it would put breeders out of buisness and then nomore animals need to get euthenized.

Since: Dec 11

Location hidden

#14 Feb 25, 2012
Concerned Pet Owner wrote:
Small furry animals such as hamsters, gerbils, rabbits and guinea pigs can be good, inexpensive choices...
I have to disagree with this statement. Guinea pigs and rabbits are not inexpensive animals. They require large cages, proper food, bedding, unlimited hay, daily vegetables and vet care when needed. The cost of keeping guinea pigs is much higher than keeping a dog or cat. Petstore cages are inadequate for both these types of animals because they need plenty of room to exercise. C&C (cubes & coroplast) cages are inexpensive to build and provide adequate space.
Buying animals from petstores while there is a huge overpopulation problem in most species is not a good thing to do. There isn't just an overpopulation problem with dogs and cats, but with guinea pigs, rabbits, and many other small animals. Why buy when shelter animals die.
I also agree. While compared to the average dogs cost it may seem cheap to get a pocket pet, it can actually be more expensive than you think. I'm getting two gerbils soon for example, and I'll tell you that the cheapest part of the cost for most pocket pets, are the pets themselves. Add up the cost of the cage, food, water bottle, treats (and/or chewable items), toys, housing, litter (bedding), exercise equipment, and vet bills in case they become ill (please make sure before you get a pocket pet or any exotic type of pet like reptiles and amphibians that you know a vet that can take those animals into consideration as not all vets treat other animals), can add up to anywhere from 30 to 80 dollars (sometimes over $100). Prices very. The cheapest would be a starter kit which includes most of the equipment already, but it's more expensive if you decide to get everything on its own.
Rita

Lake Grove, NY

#15 Feb 25, 2012
Speaking The Truth wrote:
....and never, never, never buy your pet from a pet store! The animals that are sold from pet stores, even local ones, come from questionable breeding backgrounds (i.e., puppy mills, backyard breeders, etc....) and more often than not, come with a whole history of ailments that will prove extremely costly. Pet adoption days from PetSmart or the kittens and bunnies at Franklin Hardware are about the only exceptions and that's because those animals were given to them by people who didn't intend for their animals to give birth and not bred specifically for sale through a local pet store.
Many people buy from pet stores because the pups come with "no strings attached." Some breeders (not all) seem to want to "have their cake and eat it too." They want the buyer to give them $1200 for the pup, but then they want to continue to call the shots. A friend of mine went to a breeder's home to purchase a pup. She wanted him to sign a contract stating that if for any reason, he cannot keep the pup, the pup comes back to her. My friend said if he got sick and couldn't keep the pup he would want his adult daughter to have it. Needless to say, he walked out of the breeder's home. She was astonished! I think once money is exchanged and a sale is made, that should be it. The breeder didn't have to sell in the first place, but once she did, she shouldn't have the right to dictate to the buyer how he handles the animal. I'm sure she wouldn't want the buyer to tell her how to spend the money! That's why some people go to pet stores. I know someone who bought from a pet store for that very reason. I'm not saying it's right. I'm just saying that that was the reasoning behind his choice.
Rita

Lake Grove, NY

#16 Feb 26, 2012
Rita wrote:
<quoted text>
Many people buy from pet stores because the pups come with "no strings attached." Some breeders (not all) seem to want to "have their cake and eat it too." They want the buyer to give them $1200 for the pup, but then they want to continue to call the shots. A friend of mine went to a breeder's home to purchase a pup. She wanted him to sign a contract stating that if for any reason, he cannot keep the pup, the pup comes back to her. My friend said if he got sick and couldn't keep the pup he would want his adult daughter to have it. Needless to say, he walked out of the breeder's home. She was astonished! I think once money is exchanged and a sale is made, that should be it. The breeder didn't have to sell in the first place, but once she did, she shouldn't have the right to dictate to the buyer how he handles the animal. I'm sure she wouldn't want the buyer to tell her how to spend the money! That's why some people go to pet stores. I know someone who bought from a pet store for that very reason. I'm not saying it's right. I'm just saying that that was the reasoning behind his choice.
One more thought. I just remembered what my friend said. He said, "I wanted to buy a dog, not to rent one."

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