Laser Declawing...Better?
Done

Edmonds, WA

#533 May 4, 2013
We have a cat that is fine in the house with the scratching post and is only damaging the $800 oak front door when she wants out, the rear window screens when she wants in, and now the $600 boat cover that she insist on climbing onto to lounge around on. Not to mention I just had $200 worth of modifications done to it.
I have always had cats and love cats, but this cat is overweight and has destroyed every railing, fence top, or anything else she wants to drag her self onto.

So now that I know that no one wants an over weight cat and its health issues.(by the way we tried to control her diet with very expensive food. She just eats all she can eat at other houses and her sister is just fine) I don't have a lot of alternatives. De clawing seems a lot more humane than euthanization. But after listening to all the (DON'T DE CLAW YOUR CAT CRIES)euthanization may be better as the cat will just fall asleep and not wake up.
wtf guys

Calgary, Canada

#534 May 11, 2013
Wow your all a bunch a loonies. My cats wreck my hardwood flooring by running and stopping on it ........ Even with his nails trimmed he still leaves gouges in the floor . I don't like the idea of declawing but I hate watching them destroy my house too.
Steeps87

Norman, OK

#535 May 21, 2013
I've had cats my whole life (25 years) and have always considered de-clawing a horrible thing to do. I adopted a gutter kitty about 4 years ago and gave him a loving home. He never goes hungry, always has a fresh box, gets tons of attention, has another feline friend for companionship. I feel I've given him a pretty sweet deal but in return he is super destructive. I give him scratch posts and lots of toys. The problem is his constant need for attention. He constantly wants to be right underfoot. While moving homes not too long ago, I tripped over him while carrying heavy furniture and crushed my hand. This is not the first time I've tripped on him, it happens at least 3x a week. On top of that, I cannot lock him in a room or even myself in a room away from him because he will tear a whole in the carpet trying to get under the door. To top things off, if, you aren't giving him enough attention, he will launch himself at your face and if you don't catch him, he sinks his claws into you to keep from falling. I've tried everything; training, toys, posts, cat jungle gyms, soft paws, ect. and nothing seems to work. I can't give him away, no one wants him. I don't want to put him down, he's a very loving beast. So after everything, my last hope is to remove his front claws. I feel terrible but this is my last option before having him put down.
Jimmie

United States

#536 May 21, 2013
You all are nuts. It might hurt but so does surgery on humans I had my shoulder and my knee replaced and I'm not any grumpier than normal and I feel just fine. People have their opinion and you people have no right to judge anybody. This person asked a simple question answer it and get off
MiMi

Columbus, OH

#537 May 22, 2013
Three weeks ago, my daughter bought me a cat from the shelter. I did not ask for the cat, but she thought that it would be good for me. Last year, both of my cats died. We went out and bought all new furniture. From the time Sherman came into our home, he has scratched everything but the scratching post. He scratches all the furniture, our rugs, hardwood floors, covers, doors, and more importantly people. Because I have cancer and my son has AIDS, we are afraid of being scratched too hard. However, he does like nibble as well. I know that he cannot help it, but I do not know what else to do. I have been thinking about it for the last three weeks, and I have decided to go for the laser declaw. Believe me, I do not want to do it, but I do not want to take him back to the shelter.
sam

Cleveland, OH

#538 May 27, 2013
The same people who are against declawing, circumsize their sons
Cat Momma

Noventa Di Piave, Italy

#539 May 27, 2013
sam wrote:
The same people who are against declawing, circumsize their sons
What absolute rubbish! And you can not compare declawing a cat to circumsizing a boy!

Removing a child's fingers maybe - but not circumsision!
Susan

Salem, OR

#540 Jun 11, 2013
Some people don't seem to understand cats. My cats, who had both been declawed, climbed trees, brought home mice, fought and beat off other cats and were very confident happy cats. The main way they defend themselves is with their mouth. I thought this was common knowledge for cat owners. I guess not. Ignore the bullies. They are everywhere. Do what is right for you and your family. Most of the bullies treat people cruelly and have no problem with that.
cat momma

Mckinney, TX

#541 Jun 11, 2013
My cat declawed cat does use his teeth! He bites anything and everything! Very defensive and that is why he was dumped with me - since his old owner was going to have him put down due to this issue! He has given my other cats abcesses etc
They have no way of giving their normal warning signs Like scratching the animal or person, which does not cause as much damage as biting them!
Also, if they are being attacked by something like a coyote, they have to get way too close to their attacker in order to defend themselves!
Gunner

Arnold, MO

#542 Jun 12, 2013
Cat Lover wrote:
Anyone who declaws a cat is a senseless, thoughtless, selfish, sadistic, monster who is living in the dark ages... you do not deserve to blessed with the love and presence that a cat brings to a home.
This is ridiculous. First off, domestic cats experience a life that is NOTHING like being in the wild. A domestic cat in captivity survives nearly 5x longer than one in the wild. They also do not go through their lives getting their ears ripped off or eyes gouged out by other wild cats. There is a line between being humane and being ignorant to the world outside of their little downy soft box. The world is cruel and personally, I would choose loosing a few knuckles to a life on the streets actually getting mutilated. Get over yourself.
Darius Rucker

Indianapolis, IN

#543 Jun 26, 2013
Linda H wrote:
PLEASE don't get your cat declawed. Despite what a vet will tell you, it's very painful. Of course they will tell you it isn't. They want your money. My 13 year old cat was declawed when I adopted him. Now, his front paws are all deformed and he limps all the time. Look at your hands right now. Declawing removes from the FIRST JOINT, not just the claw. Imagine having 1/4 of each one of your fingers cut off. Please don't do this to your animal. Who cares about furniture? Just hang out with other people who love animals. Their couch will be just as raggedy as yours!
I don't really believe you're an expert on veterinarians. I have found most of them to be quite humane and up-front about telling you the issues your animal will have with any given procedure. For you to say that they keep that quiet in order to make more money requires a great leap of unsupported assumption on your part and reveals that you are yet another person that has a large opinion with absolutely no foundation of fact.
cat momma

Mckinney, TX

#544 Jun 26, 2013
I have been astounded at how few people realize what declawing actually involves! Most seem to just think it is clipping the claws so low that they do not grow back! I would hope vets would tell owners what it involves, but it does seem more like if you don't ask them what it involves, then they don't tell you what it involves!
If it is so humane, how come the SPCA and most other major rescue groups will not rehome cats to homes where they intend to get the cats declared?
People need to ask their vets about what is involved with all treatments and procedures, that way they can make informed decisions!
I was shocked that people who had actually had cats declawed did not know what was actually done to their cats!
daylady

Petaluma, CA

#545 Jul 2, 2013
FatFreddysCat wrote:
<quoted text>
Be absolutely certain your now helpless cat will never get outside. He wont be able to climb a tree, or fight off an attacker.
I am in the no-declawing camp. My approach has been to place numerous scratching posts in my house and protect items that are tempting with covers. I would rather have a tattered couch than a tattered defenceless pet. Cats have been in my life for almost 60 years, and they have all had claws. I teach them as babies to be gentle so they don't hurt people.
Comparing male circumcision to declawing is a weak analogy. A man does benefit from the procedure, but he does not need his foreskin for self defence in battle, or to flee from attack.
I'm sorry, but we had two cats from kittenhood that we had declawed by our vet who had ALL his cats declawed. They lived to be 16 years old, never had any problems, recovered without any residual issues and I'm quite sure were never aware they were disabled. BTW, declawed cats typically don't have the back claws removed, so they can still climb trees, fences, and mine never had any problems with other cats or each other. They did not, however, destroy furniture, scratch, or leave us worried about leaving them alone.
daylady

Petaluma, CA

#546 Jul 2, 2013
Done wrote:
We have a cat that is fine in the house with the scratching post and is only damaging the $800 oak front door when she wants out, the rear window screens when she wants in, and now the $600 boat cover that she insist on climbing onto to lounge around on. Not to mention I just had $200 worth of modifications done to it.
I have always had cats and love cats, but this cat is overweight and has destroyed every railing, fence top, or anything else she wants to drag her self onto.
So now that I know that no one wants an over weight cat and its health issues.(by the way we tried to control her diet with very expensive food. She just eats all she can eat at other houses and her sister is just fine) I don't have a lot of alternatives. De clawing seems a lot more humane than euthanization. But after listening to all the (DON'T DE CLAW YOUR CAT CRIES)euthanization may be better as the cat will just fall asleep and not wake up.
My husband and I had two cats that were declawed with no problems. I'm pretty sure they never realized they were "disabled" but we did have it done when they were tiny kittens. No furniture destruction, no screen destruction, and no scratching. They loved us. We loved them. We did it with our vet's blessing.
cat momma

Mckinney, TX

#547 Jul 2, 2013
I am very pleased and glad your cats are happy and healthy! I wish all declawed cats were so happy and lucky, sadly there are many that do not come through it so lightly :( and many get put down or dumped due to the behavioural problems they develope.
Cat lover

Palm City, FL

#548 Jul 11, 2013
Declawing is a horrible painful thing to do just because you don't want them scratching the furniture. It's sick and torturous. Like missing all your fingernails. You can train cats to use appropriate places to scratch. If they still scratch the furniture too bad, You made the decision to have the cat. If you don't want it to scratch try the soft nails. Just because humans are more intelligent than cats doesnt give them the right to mutilate them to protect their furniture! Is there a way to pull all the cats' hair out to so they don't shed on the furniture? Can we stop them from eliminating because it smells and we don't like it? Where does it stop? If humans are so superior than use that intelligence to be compassionate, love animals for who they are. Don't mutilate them!
guest

Brookland, AR

#549 Jul 12, 2013
Cat lover wrote:
Declawing is a horrible painful thing to do just because you don't want them scratching the furniture. It's sick and torturous. Like missing all your fingernails. You can train cats to use appropriate places to scratch. If they still scratch the furniture too bad, You made the decision to have the cat. If you don't want it to scratch try the soft nails. Just because humans are more intelligent than cats doesnt give them the right to mutilate them to protect their furniture! Is there a way to pull all the cats' hair out to so they don't shed on the furniture? Can we stop them from eliminating because it smells and we don't like it? Where does it stop? If humans are so superior than use that intelligence to be compassionate, love animals for who they are. Don't mutilate them!
I have a set of soft claws but havent applied them yet because I decided my cat would probably just chew them off.
Has anyone had that happen with their cat after applying the soft claws?
cat momma

Mckinney, TX

#550 Jul 12, 2013
I have heard some people that said their cats tried to do that, but suppose it is like when you put a collar on a cat for the first time and they try to get it off, they get used to it.
Clipping the claws is probably just as easy, of not even easier (but again, I have never had to try soft paws)
MeowDr

Sebastian, FL

#551 Jul 18, 2013
PrideandPrejudice wrote:
My family has been debating whether or not we should get our cat declawed. The humanity of declawing a cat is apparently quite controversial, but as we don't want to give away our beloved pet since she is a rabid and notorious furniture destroyer and absolutely won't let me trim her claws, we've seriously considered declawing her.
The traditional method of declawing, from what I know, causes a cat quite a bit of pain, has a long healing period, and will hinder a cat's mobility for a while. Our vet recommends laser declawing, which is less purportedly less painful. I'm still hesistant because laser or not, declawing a cat is still akin to slicing off the tip of my own fingers and most of all, I'm worried that declawing my cat will permanently change the rambunctious playful personality that I love about her.
I'd appreciate some advice from cat owners and esp those who have had their own cats declawed. Thanks!
There are two acceptable surgical techniques: claw removal using a fine surgical blade, followed by a suture in the toe, bandaging, and pain meds for three days and claw removal using a laser with similar aftercare. A study was done recently to see if laser removal was superior, and it was not. In the hands of an experienced veterinary surgeon, the blade method or the laser method are both acceptable. There is very little discomfort. However in the hands of an experienced surgeon, the cat could have significant discomfort post-op: lesson is to ask your vet which technique she uses, and always opt for an experienced veterinarian. This also applies for other surgical procedures.
MeowDr

Sebastian, FL

#552 Jul 18, 2013
Laser surgery is not superior for results vs declawing using a fine blade technique. A recent study comparing post-surgical results has confirmed this. With similar surgical experience the two techniques are the same for results. Use a veterinary surgeon who is experienced and cares about aftercare. All surgical procedures produce discomfort post-op, including spay and neutering, and that is why analgesics should be used post-op. Again-experience is king here. Only the claw is removed, not the tissues around the claw. In the case of cats the claw and the third digit are one, not separate anatomically. In addition cats do not walk on the claw/third digit, it is held in a retracted position until the claw is needed for grasping prey. You could also use soft-paws, a product that is soft plastic, but these are not often successful, as cats remove them.

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