Why it Matters: Social Security

Why it Matters: Social Security

There are 34 comments on the WLS-AM Chicago story from Sep 30, 2012, titled Why it Matters: Social Security. In it, WLS-AM Chicago reports that:

Unless Congress acts, the trust funds that support Social Security will run out of money in 2033, according to the trustees who oversee the retirement and disability program.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WLS-AM Chicago.

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“"I'm A Great American!"”

Since: Sep 08

Obama Nation! USA! USA!

#1 Sep 30, 2012
It "matters", in large part, because seniors vote. And hey don't take kindly to changes with Social Security.

“"I'm A Great American!"”

Since: Sep 08

Obama Nation! USA! USA!

#2 Sep 30, 2012
Correction: It "matters", in large part, because seniors vote. And THEY don't take kindly to changes with Social Security.
question

Menard, TX

#3 Sep 30, 2012
I wonder how many 'seniors' depend on Social Security and Medicare for their living. If some do, does that matter?
xnutmegger

Phoenix, AZ

#4 Sep 30, 2012
SS matters becaue nobody has stopped the theft of it since LBJ started the rape and pillage of it in 1966 to pay for " Guns and butter".

LEFTY claims that the GOP wants to steal what LBJ started looting 46 years ago.

Cat out of the bag ?

Oh well , what else would you expect of LEFTY ?
Austinite

Austin, TX

#6 Sep 30, 2012
It matters because trillions have been borrowed from it for other government programs and never paid back. If the monies were paid back SS would be good to go for a hundred years or more.
People have paid into it and deserve to get what is owed to them. Rich people, politicians included do not need it but will take it when they can so it is easy for them to discount its worth to the average American.
The program is not meant to be a sole source of support but rather an aid to individuals in their retirement but for some people it is their sole source of income.
E Pluribus Unum

Carol Stream, IL

#7 Sep 30, 2012
PooPoo Platter wrote:
It "matters", in large part, because seniors vote. And hey don't take kindly to changes with Social Security.
Poo! 2013,2023,2033 which one is more corrent from the 2CBO;-000
E Pluribus Unum

Carol Stream, IL

#8 Sep 30, 2012
question wrote:
I wonder how many 'seniors' depend on Social Security and Medicare for their living. If some do, does that matter?
high school sr. or college sr. it's the Robot error!!!;-000h, just wait Jan, 1st 2013;-000

“Happiness comes through giving”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#9 Sep 30, 2012
question wrote:
I wonder how many 'seniors' depend on Social Security and Medicare for their living. If some do, does that matter?
If you're lucky, you won't grow old.

If anyone wants an example of the clear difference between righties and lefties, try to imagine a lefty saying what the above a'hole said.

“Happiness comes through giving”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#10 Sep 30, 2012
Many maybe opposed, but I think, given that people live longer today, it is worth considering raising the age of full eligibility from 65 to 67. Of course, we would have to make sure that people at or near the current age of eligibility are not affected.
xnutmegger

Phoenix, AZ

#11 Sep 30, 2012
Lawrence Wolf wrote:
Many maybe opposed, but I think, given that people live longer today, it is worth considering raising the age of full eligibility from 65 to 67. Of course, we would have to make sure that people at or near the current age of eligibility are not affected.
Posters on here claim I'm a nasty attack dog.

But what should I say when you don't know that the full retirement age for anyone born after 1960 is " 67" YO.It's already 67 for a certain age group no change required to get there.

It's statements like yours that brings out my ATTACK DOG personality.

WTF , don't you research the full SS age scedule before you post ?

Normally I would accuse you of being in the Lib " information bubble " but I won't his time.

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

#12 Sep 30, 2012
Harry Reid will not allow congress to act. He's too busy lying about Benghazi and such and such.

“Happiness comes through giving”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#13 Sep 30, 2012
xnutmegger wrote:
<quoted text>
Posters on here claim I'm a nasty attack dog.
But what should I say when you don't know that the full retirement age for anyone born after 1960 is " 67" YO.It's already 67 for a certain age group no change required to get there.
It's statements like yours that brings out my ATTACK DOG personality.
WTF , don't you research the full SS age scedule before you post ?
Normally I would accuse you of being in the Lib " information bubble " but I won't his time.
Stay, Nutcase. Play dead.

Since: Mar 09

The Left Coast

#14 Oct 1, 2012
Easy solution. Raise the retirement age to 97 for everyone born after 1960.

“It's a Brand New Day”

Since: Feb 06

New Rochelle

#15 Oct 1, 2012
Austinite wrote:
It matters because trillions have been borrowed from it for other government programs and never paid back. If the monies were paid back SS would be good to go for a hundred years or more.
People have paid into it and deserve to get what is owed to them. Rich people, politicians included do not need it but will take it when they can so it is easy for them to discount its worth to the average American.
The program is not meant to be a sole source of support but rather an aid to individuals in their retirement but for some people it is their sole source of income.
It is highly unlikely that congress will find billions to pay back what they borrowed.

The only solution is to raise the pper income cap on SS.(Or, simply to increase it.)

The only solution

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#16 Oct 1, 2012
Austinite wrote:
It matters because trillions have been borrowed from it for other government programs and never paid back. If the monies were paid back SS would be good to go for a hundred years or more.
People have paid into it and deserve to get what is owed to them. Rich people, politicians included do not need it but will take it when they can so it is easy for them to discount its worth to the average American.
The program is not meant to be a sole source of support but rather an aid to individuals in their retirement but for some people it is their sole source of income.
Yes, for a lot of retiring Americans it is and will be their main source of income. My father had a much better retirement that I will have. He receives a pension from the company he worked for for 25 years, plus he gets his social security. He's not rich, but he has a secure income for the rest of his life. Not to mention, he at 60 and has been able to enjoy growing older stress free.

Me? Pensions are a thing of the past, and I only began working for this company 13 years ago when I divorced. That's not very long to be investing in a 401K. I have less than 10 years before I can retire. I've raised my family alone on a single salary, which unlike couples, left me with less to invest. If I can get my house paid off, that will help me retire, but Social Security will certainly be an important part of that.

It's easy for the rich to say "raise the age of retirement" because they can retire whenever they want. It's easy for them to want to change Social Security because they will never need it. They'll accept it, but they don't need it.

I want the rich to stop screwing with MY life. Since it's well known now they they don't care about the "little" people I wish they would go find ways to make money rather than look for ways to take it away from everyone else.
Austinite

Austin, TX

#17 Oct 1, 2012
PayThat CEO wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, for a lot of retiring Americans it is and will be their main source of income. My father had a much better retirement that I will have. He receives a pension from the company he worked for for 25 years, plus he gets his social security. He's not rich, but he has a secure income for the rest of his life. Not to mention, he at 60 and has been able to enjoy growing older stress free.
Me? Pensions are a thing of the past, and I only began working for this company 13 years ago when I divorced. That's not very long to be investing in a 401K. I have less than 10 years before I can retire. I've raised my family alone on a single salary, which unlike couples, left me with less to invest. If I can get my house paid off, that will help me retire, but Social Security will certainly be an important part of that.
It's easy for the rich to say "raise the age of retirement" because they can retire whenever they want. It's easy for them to want to change Social Security because they will never need it. They'll accept it, but they don't need it.
I want the rich to stop screwing with MY life. Since it's well known now they they don't care about the "little" people I wish they would go find ways to make money rather than look for ways to take it away from everyone else.
Well said. I joined the military at age 18 as eveb back then my father told me not to rely on SS or any company in the future for any decent pension. He was right about that and alot of other things as well.
I have health insurance and a pension from my almost three decades of service and am not 50 yet.
xnutmegger

Phoenix, AZ

#18 Oct 1, 2012
Mr_Bill wrote:
<quoted text>
It is highly unlikely that congress will find billions to pay back what they borrowed.
The only solution is to raise the pper income cap on SS.(Or, simply to increase it.)
The only solution
Congress's " Game " to pay it back is to take money out of both of your pockets.
Steal the excess SS paid in and replace it with the regular Fed. Income Tax from your paycheck.
They steal from you and then make you replace the money they stole.

Your solution is to allow them to increase the " Grand theft ".
xnutmegger

Phoenix, AZ

#19 Oct 1, 2012
PayThat CEO wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, for a lot of retiring Americans it is and will be their main source of income. My father had a much better retirement that I will have. He receives a pension from the company he worked for for 25 years, plus he gets his social security. He's not rich, but he has a secure income for the rest of his life. Not to mention, he at 60 and has been able to enjoy growing older stress free.
Me? Pensions are a thing of the past, and I only began working for this company 13 years ago when I divorced. That's not very long to be investing in a 401K. I have less than 10 years before I can retire. I've raised my family alone on a single salary, which unlike couples, left me with less to invest. If I can get my house paid off, that will help me retire, but Social Security will certainly be an important part of that.
It's easy for the rich to say "raise the age of retirement" because they can retire whenever they want. It's easy for them to want to change Social Security because they will never need it. They'll accept it, but they don't need it.
I want the rich to stop screwing with MY life. Since it's well known now they they don't care about the "little" people I wish they would go find ways to make money rather than look for ways to take it away from everyone else.
Duh.

Class-warfare = JEALOUSY and HATE.

“It's a Brand New Day”

Since: Feb 06

New Rochelle

#20 Oct 1, 2012
Austinite wrote:
<quoted text>
Well said. I joined the military at age 18 as eveb back then my father told me not to rely on SS or any company in the future for any decent pension. He was right about that and alot of other things as well.
I have health insurance and a pension from my almost three decades of service and am not 50 yet.
I expect, then, that you will not be filing for Social Secuurity.
Say that you won't. Please promise that you believe your father's baseless predjudices, over your country's promise; and say "I won't file for SS, no matter what."

P.S. Whyever do you believe in a military pension and benefits?
You have made a life in the military, an I thank you; but it has stultified your understanding of your own government.

You have been a tool, of statecraft, and your future iis assured.
I have worked in those companies that pay taxes, and with my own taxes, paid thankfully for your benefits and salary.

When you leave the military, do take a job in the private sector, or even stay in government (try 'Homeland Security.') and put extra money into a 4011k. Your old self will thank your young self.

I'm sure your father is a nice man, but he is dead wrong.
And I hope he is still with us.
Austinite

Austin, TX

#21 Oct 1, 2012
Mr_Bill wrote:
<quoted text>
I expect, then, that you will not be filing for Social Secuurity.
Say that you won't. Please promise that you believe your father's baseless predjudices, over your country's promise; and say "I won't file for SS, no matter what."
P.S. Whyever do you believe in a military pension and benefits?
You have made a life in the military, an I thank you; but it has stultified your understanding of your own government.
You have been a tool, of statecraft, and your future iis assured.
I have worked in those companies that pay taxes, and with my own taxes, paid thankfully for your benefits and salary.
When you leave the military, do take a job in the private sector, or even stay in government (try 'Homeland Security.') and put extra money into a 4011k. Your old self will thank your young self.
I'm sure your father is a nice man, but he is dead wrong.
And I hope he is still with us.
I doubt SS will be around when I reach whatever age it will be to claim what I have paid into. I would not rely on it as my main source of income but yes, I would claim what is mine if and when the time comes. I too paid alot of taxes while I was in the military. I also pay alot of taxes on my rental properties.
My future is hopefully assured through my military pension but I also bought three houses in my time and rented them out, they are all paid off now by the renters over the years so I have that income as well.
I invested nothing in stocks and am glad for that.
I more or less work, managing my rental properties and making whatever repairs are needed. I used to have an agency do that while I was away but no need for that now.
My father died when aged 41 from a massive heart attack. He worked a full time good job and two part time jobs to make ends meet. His full time job offered a pension but he died well before he could collect a penny. My mother still works and collects a whopping $121.09 monthly of the pension from him. She is about to retire from where she works a good job, that offers no pension. In two years she can collect her SS, unless the government raises the age yet again. She will collect on his before then.

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