Mayor McGinn Calls On Seattle To Divest From Fossil Fuels

Dec 27, 2012 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: KUOW-FM Seattle

A historic gas pump in Issaquah, Wash. Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn wants his city to not invest in oil and gas companies.

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1 - 11 of 11 Comments Last updated Jan 20, 2013
Northie

Spokane, WA

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#1
Dec 28, 2012
 

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A beautiful thing, Mr. Mayor. I divested from oil, coal and gas years ago. Glad to see you following suit.
PHD

Overton, TX

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#2
Dec 28, 2012
 

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Mayor McGinn Calls On Seattle To Divest From Fossil Fuels
Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn wants the city to get its money out of fossil fuels. He has called on the city’s two main retirement funds to divest millions of dollars invested in oil and gas companies.

Oh ya that's the answer more dollars in his pocket. Would oil and natural gas be a fossil fuel or have the climate changer scientist changed that one again?
litesong

Lynnwood, WA

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#3
Dec 28, 2012
 
If they bought exxon in the middle of 2010, they'll make a little bit of money, not too bad. If they bought exxon in the middle of 2008, they'll lose some money.
PHD

Overton, TX

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#4
Dec 28, 2012
 

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Would oil and natural gas be a fossil fuel or have the climate changer scientist changed that one again?

“For F***'s Sake”

Since: Aug 12

Tanner Flats

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#5
Jan 18, 2013
 

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Northie wrote:
A beautiful thing, Mr. Mayor. I divested from oil, coal and gas years ago. Glad to see you following suit.
That's funny, your hero Al Gore sold out to big oil and Islam in one fell swoop! Now you can watch Current TV and Aljazeera at the same time! You left-tards must feel giddy about that. <¦-o
PHD

Overton, TX

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#6
Jan 18, 2013
 

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Just follow the money.

“For F***'s Sake”

Since: Aug 12

Tanner Flats

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#7
Jan 18, 2013
 

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PHD wrote:
Just follow the money.
What was it about a 100 million in profits, Al Gore put in is pocket conveniently just in time to escape Obama's big income tax hike.
PHD

Overton, TX

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#8
Jan 18, 2013
 

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1USA1 wrote:
<quoted text>What was it about a 100 million in profits, Al Gore put in is pocket conveniently just in time to escape Obama's big income tax hike.
Like the tax reform act of 1986. The rich GOP and the Blue Dogs became filthy rich on the real tax payers backs. My bad only the middle class backs.

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

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#9
Jan 19, 2013
 
1USA1 wrote:
<quoted text>That's funny, your hero Al Gore sold out to big oil and Islam in one fell swoop! Now you can watch Current TV and Aljazeera at the same time! You left-tards must feel giddy about that. <¦-o
No, an Arab respected news corporation is NOT the same thing as oil.

What a right wing nut case.
PHD

Overton, TX

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#11
Jan 20, 2013
 

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Wallop10 wrote:
<quoted text>
No, an Arab respected news corporation is NOT the same thing as oil.
What a right wing nut case.
More useless scientific science fiction useless babble cut and paste BS. Will it ever end?

Since: Jan 13

Fairfax, VA

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#12
Jan 20, 2013
 
NASA.

Evidence: Climate change: How do we know?

The Earth's climate has changed throughout history. Just in the last 650,000 years there have been seven cycles of glacial advance and retreat, with the abrupt end of the last ice age about 7,000 years ago marking the beginning of the modern climate era — and of human civilization. Most of these climate changes are attributed to very small variations in Earth’s orbit that change the amount of solar energy our planet receives.

The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is very likely human-induced and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented in the past 1,300 years.1

Earth-orbiting satellites and other technological advances have enabled scientists to see the big picture, collecting many different types of information about our planet and its climate on a global scale. Studying these climate data collected over many years reveal the signals of a changing climate.
Certain facts about Earth's climate are not in dispute:

The heat-trapping nature of carbon dioxide and other gases was demonstrated in the mid-19th century.2Their ability to affect the transfer of infrared energy through the atmosphere is the scientific basis of many JPL-designed instruments, such as AIRS. Increased levels of greenhouse gases must cause the Earth to warm in response.

Ice cores drawn from Greenland, Antarctica, and tropical mountain glaciers show that the Earth’s climate responds to changes in solar output, in the Earth’s orbit, and in greenhouse gas levels. They also show that in the past, large changes in climate have happened very quickly, geologically-speaking: in tens of years, not in millions or even thousands.3
The evidence for rapid climate change is compelling:

• Sea level rise
Global sea level rose about 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) in the last century. The rate in the last decade, however, is nearly double that of the last century.4

• Global temperature rise
All three major global surface temperature reconstructions show that Earth has warmed since 1880.5 Most of this warming has occurred since the 1970s, with the 20 warmest years having occurred since 1981 and with all 10 of the warmest years occurring in the past 12 years.6 Even though the 2000s witnessed a solar output decline resulting in an unusually deep solar minimum in 2007-2009, surface temperatures continue to increase.7

• Warming oceans
The oceans have absorbed much of this increased heat, with the top 700 meters (about 2,300 feet) of ocean showing warming of 0.302 degrees Fahrenheit since 1969.8

• Shrinking ice sheets
The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have decreased in mass. Data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment show Greenland lost 150 to 250 cubic kilometers (36 to 60 cubic miles) of ice per year between 2002 and 2006, while Antarctica lost about 152 cubic kilometers (36 cubic miles) of ice between 2002 and 2005.

• Declining Arctic sea ice
Both the extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice has declined rapidly over the last several decades.9

• Glacial retreat
Glaciers are retreating almost everywhere around the world — including in the Alps, Himalayas, Andes, Rockies, Alaska and Africa.

• Extreme events
The number of record high temperature events in the United States has been increasing, while the number of record low temperature events has been decreasing, since 1950.

• Ocean acidification
Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the acidity of surface ocean waters has increased by about 30 percent.12,13 This increase is the result of humans emitting more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and hence more being absorbed into the oceans. The amount of carbon dioxide absorbed by the upper layer of the oceans is increasing by about 2 billion tons per year.14,15

http://climate.nasa.gov/evidence

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