Hunters play role in elk management

Hunters play role in elk management

There are 7 comments on the Estes Park Trail-Gazette story from Jan 15, 2014, titled Hunters play role in elk management. In it, Estes Park Trail-Gazette reports that:

This bull elk wandered down into the foothills this fall and has been spotted west of town a few more times lately.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Estes Park Trail-Gazette.

Estes Park Resident

Estes Park, CO

#1 Jan 16, 2014
Of course, this pro hunting piece does not point out that the extensive take of elk east of RMNP means that this winter, only 300 elk are thought to occupy the entire park. This is way below the intended management number of 600-800. While the hunters are killing practically domestic elk and getting their jollies, the number of elk that will return to their appropriate summer range will be way below usual trends. Given the long-term closure and construction on Route 66 to Boulder, there may be a reduced number of tourists who will bother to do a day trip to Estes Park. When they see very few elk (what is left will be in the mountains) the purpose for even coming to RMNP will be diminished. Few wildlife for viewing means fewer tourists who make the trip. We have the hunting lobby and CPW to thank for that.
Fewer elk

Windsor, CO

#2 Jan 19, 2014
will mean the ecosystem within the Park can recover from the extensive overgrazing the too many elk caused. If/when more willow and birch and alder and aspen come back, that will improve the chances that beaver can again populate and thrive and start working to raise the water tables as they build pond after pond to hold water.

Why was the Park overgrazed and elk allowed to overrun everything? Because elk-huggers like Estes Park Resident only see one or two charismatic big animal species, and have no clue about ecology. I'll wager he/she/its a business owner who relies on gawking, traffic stopping elk-jams.

BTW - do you think that maybe, just maybe there have been fewer elk in the Park may be due to last winters fire in Moraine Park? And all those elk down by Loveland - do you think they just materialized out of thin air? No, they are the same elk that have migrated to lusher pastures......
Estes Park Resident wrote:
Of course, this pro hunting piece does not point out that the extensive take of elk east of RMNP means that this winter, only 300 elk are thought to occupy the entire park. This is way below the intended management number of 600-800. While the hunters are killing practically domestic elk and getting their jollies, the number of elk that will return to their appropriate summer range will be way below usual trends. Given the long-term closure and construction on Route 66 to Boulder, there may be a reduced number of tourists who will bother to do a day trip to Estes Park. When they see very few elk (what is left will be in the mountains) the purpose for even coming to RMNP will be diminished. Few wildlife for viewing means fewer tourists who make the trip. We have the hunting lobby and CPW to thank for that.
Really

Louisville, CO

#3 Jan 20, 2014
Estes Park Resident wrote:
Of course, this pro hunting piece does not point out that the extensive take of elk east of RMNP means that this winter, only 300 elk are thought to occupy the entire park. This is way below the intended management number of 600-800. While the hunters are killing practically domestic elk and getting their jollies, the number of elk that will return to their appropriate summer range will be way below usual trends. Given the long-term closure and construction on Route 66 to Boulder, there may be a reduced number of tourists who will bother to do a day trip to Estes Park. When they see very few elk (what is left will be in the mountains) the purpose for even coming to RMNP will be diminished. Few wildlife for viewing means fewer tourists who make the trip. We have the hunting lobby and for that.
Do you really believe people only come here for the elk?
I thought they may be coming here for the ,oh, let's see, the mountains, the scenery, the hiking, the fishing, all the other abundant wildlife.
Anyone with a clue would understand that the overpopulation of the elk and deer, led to chronic wasting disease to name just one problem.
As for your comment about, "practically domesticated", sounds like perhaps you are one of the people who feed the elk and deer, both illegal, and dangerous to the survival of the animals themselves because they are fed things they shouldn't be eating in the first place and become to dependent on that instead of actually foraging on there own. Not allowing for natural selection, also known as the strong survive and the weak pass on.
Gat a clue!!
Nathan Kettner

Colorado Springs, CO

#4 Jan 21, 2014
Do you have some data to support your assertions? I believe the RMNP herd is the most scrutinized bunch of elk in the world. I sincerely doubt that the culling operations have taken more than planned.

“Evolved hunter/gatherer”

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#5 Jan 21, 2014
Nathan Kettner wrote:
Do you have some data to support your assertions? I believe the RMNP herd is the most scrutinized bunch of elk in the world. I sincerely doubt that the culling operations have taken more than planned.
I beg to differ. The most scrutinized elk herd in the world is the herd in Grand Teton National Park.
Do they hunt elk in RMNP?
jesus

Aurora, CO

#6 Jan 23, 2014
I suggest if you want this to be a true sporting event.......have hunters wear antlers while hunting.......
Betty Wood

Loveland, CO

#7 Jan 25, 2014
Estes Park Resident wrote:
Of course, this pro hunting piece does not point out that the extensive take of elk east of RMNP means that this winter, only 300 elk are thought to occupy the entire park. This is way below the intended management number of 600-800. While the hunters are killing practically domestic elk and getting their jollies, the number of elk that will return to their appropriate summer range will be way below usual trends. Given the long-term closure and construction on Route 66 to Boulder, there may be a reduced number of tourists who will bother to do a day trip to Estes Park. When they see very few elk (what is left will be in the mountains) the purpose for even coming to RMNP will be diminished. Few wildlife for viewing means fewer tourists who make the trip. We have the hunting lobby and CPW to thank for that.
Lib-tard alert! Sound the alarm! Lib-tard alert!

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