Dumler Asks Judge to Throw Out Petition

Dumler Asks Judge to Throw Out Petition

There are 103 comments on the NBC29 Charlottesville story from Apr 15, 2013, titled Dumler Asks Judge to Throw Out Petition. In it, NBC29 Charlottesville reports that:

Dumler's attorney has filed papers asking a judge to throw out the petition to have him removed from office.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29 Charlottesville.

Bollocks

Stone Mountain, GA

#85 Apr 29, 2013
real central Va Marine wrote:
Waiting to hear back from the "experts"...
"The experts" haven't been making a claim like you have. We're only responding to claims made. That's a significant difference between us.

One has a burden of proof to fulfill, and for the record, it's not us.
Bollocks

Stone Mountain, GA

#86 Apr 29, 2013
zeb wrote:
Some people just dont get the hint they are not wanted, reminds me of obama
Reminds me of politics. Find me a politician that has 100% universal support from his/her community, and I'll buy you a steak dinner. Eh, what the hey, two steak dinners.
Bollocks

Stone Mountain, GA

#87 Apr 29, 2013
CvilleMechEngr wrote:
<quoted text>
I am not an expert, but my opinion is that Dumler should, as I've said before, fall on his sword. He is doing nobody any good with this lingering death. He's just making the whole community look foolish. I could care less what's legal. His actions are not logical.
His actions are as logical as they could be for somebody in his position. "Falling on the sword" is probably the most damning thing somebody could do to indirectly admit guilt. The guy held his ground on his innocence, and eventually plead guilty to a lesser charge when he couldn't keep up the financial fight. His bloodthirsty community wants to see him shuffling his feet and casting a remorseful frown everywhere he goes, but no practical politician does that. You need to remain professional everywhere you go, and maintaining an optimistic attitude and keeping focused on the real issues is what any politician should do.

You "could care less what's legal?" Are you friggin' kidding me? Then under what process do you dictate consistency for what's right and what's wrong? How do you remain consistent? A statement like that is an invitation to turn our rigid legal structure with uniform laws and regulations and penalties into a weak gelatin pool that shifts and changes with the legal tides. "Dumler admitted to committing this crime, thus he deserves 30 days in prison, plus he needs to relinquish his political position, as well as being dishonorably discharged from his JAG position!" sounds pretty harsh compared to Joe Schmo who did the same crime and only got 30 days in prison with no further penalties. When you bend and shape rules to meet emotional responses, you compromise the integrity of the legal system, and there could be no further injustice than redefining justice to accommodate a vocal minority.

In retrospect, his community will have made his community look foolish. I haven't heard of this many people backslapping each other over throwing somebody to the lions den since I read about the Salem Witch Trials. Those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
real central va Marine

Crozet, VA

#88 Apr 30, 2013
CvilleMechEngr wrote:
<quoted text>
I am not an expert, but my opinion is that Dumler should, as I've said before, fall on his sword. He is doing nobody any good with this lingering death. He's just making the whole community look foolish. I could care less what's legal. His actions are not logical.
You are right...It's now too late for any graceful exit, the case goes to trial. Again, Mr. Dumler's judgement is in question now, as he only seemed to care about himself, and not what is best for his constituents. For Bollocks and Dave B, that is the higher standard that those in public life are called to maintain. All who serve in public life, police, teachers, military, lawyers (usually), judges, supervisors, govt officials are subject to the public ire for being "just like a regular joe". So I suppose Dave B and Bollocks are okay with the Gov's accepting "gifts"? I'm not. The aforementioned "public servants" have influence, and therefore must be wary of "those bearing gifts". That is the higher standard. Why do so many aspire to be average and "just like everyone else"? That is why the US has lost its edge in the world.
real central va Marine

Crozet, VA

#89 Apr 30, 2013
Bollocks wrote:
<quoted text>
Reminds me of politics. Find me a politician that has 100% universal support from his/her community, and I'll buy you a steak dinner. Eh, what the hey, two steak dinners.
You simpleton, NO ONE ever has 100% approval. Not even you or Dave B.
real central va Marine

Crozet, VA

#90 Apr 30, 2013
Bollocks, I apologize for calling you a simpleton...I have not had my morning caffeine yet. My mistake.
real central va Marine

Crozet, VA

#91 Apr 30, 2013
Bollocks wrote:
<quoted text>
His actions are as logical as they could be for somebody in his position. "Falling on the sword" is probably the most damning thing somebody could do to indirectly admit guilt. The guy held his ground on his innocence, and eventually plead guilty to a lesser charge when he couldn't keep up the financial fight. His bloodthirsty community wants to see him shuffling his feet and casting a remorseful frown everywhere he goes, but no practical politician does that. You need to remain professional everywhere you go, and maintaining an optimistic attitude and keeping focused on the real issues is what any politician should do.
You "could care less what's legal?" Are you friggin' kidding me? Then under what process do you dictate consistency for what's right and what's wrong? How do you remain consistent? A statement like that is an invitation to turn our rigid legal structure with uniform laws and regulations and penalties into a weak gelatin pool that shifts and changes with the legal tides. "Dumler admitted to committing this crime, thus he deserves 30 days in prison, plus he needs to relinquish his political position, as well as being dishonorably discharged from his JAG position!" sounds pretty harsh compared to Joe Schmo who did the same crime and only got 30 days in prison with no further penalties. When you bend and shape rules to meet emotional responses, you compromise the integrity of the legal system, and there could be no further injustice than redefining justice to accommodate a vocal minority.
In retrospect, his community will have made his community look foolish. I haven't heard of this many people backslapping each other over throwing somebody to the lions den since I read about the Salem Witch Trials. Those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
"A statement like that is an invitation to turn our rigid legal structure with uniform laws and regulations and penalties into a weak gelatin pool that shifts and changes with the legal tides"...kind of like "progressivism?
CvilleMechEngr

Charlottesville, VA

#92 Apr 30, 2013
Bollocks wrote:
<quoted text>
It's not even clear to me that he did anything illegal. He was accused, and he caved in. None of that matters. He can't be effective. He's a liability. The good of the community should trump his personal gain. Staying is an act of selfishness. It accomplishes nothing for the community other than notoriety.

We don't have laws. We have rules. They change from country to country, state to state, city to city, etc. We decide for ourselves what's right and what's wrong. Nobody can do that for us. You can't avoid the rules of man, but you work with the system that you have where you are. It's a big board game, and Dumler made a bad move.

Since: Apr 13

Elkton, VA

#93 Apr 30, 2013
real central va Marine wrote:
<quoted text>You are right...It's now too late for any graceful exit, the case goes to trial. Again, Mr. Dumler's judgement is in question now, as he only seemed to care about himself, and not what is best for his constituents. For Bollocks and Dave B, that is the higher standard that those in public life are called to maintain. All who serve in public life, police, teachers, military, lawyers (usually), judges, supervisors, govt officials are subject to the public ire for being "just like a regular joe". So I suppose Dave B and Bollocks are okay with the Gov's accepting "gifts"? I'm not. The aforementioned "public servants" have influence, and therefore must be wary of "those bearing gifts". That is the higher standard. Why do so many aspire to be average and "just like everyone else"? That is why the US has lost its edge in the world.
Actually, no...I think that Bob McDonnell's a piece of crap...and has been since I sued him when he was A.G....Ken Cuchinelli is tied to the same company.

Since: Apr 13

Elkton, VA

#94 Apr 30, 2013
CvilleMechEngr wrote:
<quoted text>
It's not even clear to me that he did anything illegal. He was accused, and he caved in. None of that matters. He can't be effective. He's a liability. The good of the community should trump his personal gain. Staying is an act of selfishness. It accomplishes nothing for the community other than notoriety.
We don't have laws. We have rules. They change from country to country, state to state, city to city, etc. We decide for ourselves what's right and what's wrong. Nobody can do that for us. You can't avoid the rules of man, but you work with the system that you have where you are. It's a big board game, and Dumler made a bad move.
He could be effective if those like you and the BoS would just get the hell over the criminal stuff and proceed with doing the people's business
CvilleMechEngr

Charlottesville, VA

#95 Apr 30, 2013
Dave Briggman wrote:
<quoted text>
He could be effective if those like you and the BoS would just get the hell over the criminal stuff and proceed with doing the people's business
You're not paying attention. I said that the criminal stuff is not relevant to me. I wasn't there. I don't know what he did or she said, etc. If they are jailing for sodomy, then we're all in trouble. I merely said that he can't be effective, and that he should leave for the good of the community.

Since: Apr 13

Elkton, VA

#96 Apr 30, 2013
CvilleMechEngr wrote:
<quoted text>
You're not paying attention. I said that the criminal stuff is not relevant to me. I wasn't there. I don't know what he did or she said, etc. If they are jailing for sodomy, then we're all in trouble. I merely said that he can't be effective, and that he should leave for the good of the community.
And you're not paying attention, either...the criminal stuff is over...let it go, the system worked exactly as it is supposed to.

If it was the intent to be able to remove someone for this offense, the statute would have been created or amended to have included it...it wasn't...even during this most recent session of the General Assembly.
Bollocks

Stone Mountain, GA

#97 Apr 30, 2013
CvilleMechEngr wrote:
<quoted text>
You're not paying attention. I said that the criminal stuff is not relevant to me. I wasn't there. I don't know what he did or she said, etc. If they are jailing for sodomy, then we're all in trouble. I merely said that he can't be effective, and that he should leave for the good of the community.
How can he not be effective? What sort of system do you use to determine whether somebody can or can't be effective? It's the opposition that's been driving this hobby horse and making it difficult to have him get any work done. The opposition is creating the conflict that they strive to point out.
Bollocks

Stone Mountain, GA

#98 Apr 30, 2013
real central va Marine wrote:
Bollocks, I apologize for calling you a simpleton...I have not had my morning caffeine yet. My mistake.
It's all good, I've been called worse!

Anyways, the point I was making was that people will always have a negative opinion of Dumler with or without this case, because they just don't want democrats on the board, in the senate, in the house, etc. That's why it's easy to see that there will always be a vocal opposition to every politician's views, it's just maintaining how far they go with it that's my biggest concern. When you vocally disagree with somebody's policies and practices, that's fine and fair, but when people distort facts and create straw men out of fair, honest politicians, that's dirty politics. I've seen the attack sites and found them to be some of the most blatantly dishonest sites on the web. They're just nasty slander tools.
Bollocks

Stone Mountain, GA

#99 Apr 30, 2013
real central va Marine wrote:
<quoted text>
"A statement like that is an invitation to turn our rigid legal structure with uniform laws and regulations and penalties into a weak gelatin pool that shifts and changes with the legal tides"...kind of like "progressivism?
Kind of like special pleading. The crime has remained the same over the years and the penalty should as well. We shouldn't just bend the severity of it just because it suddenly has come unto an elected official.
CvilleMechEngr

Charlottesville, VA

#100 Apr 30, 2013
Dave Briggman wrote:
<quoted text>
And you're not paying attention, either...the criminal stuff is over...let it go, the system worked exactly as it is supposed to.
If it was the intent to be able to remove someone for this offense, the statute would have been created or amended to have included it...it wasn't...even during this most recent session of the General Assembly.
You just do not get it, or you just can't read. I have nothing to let go of. I have no opinion on your criminal stuff. I was only talking about what Dumler should do: quit.
CvilleMechEngr

Charlottesville, VA

#101 Apr 30, 2013
Bollocks wrote:
<quoted text>
How can he not be effective? What sort of system do you use to determine whether somebody can or can't be effective? It's the opposition that's been driving this hobby horse and making it difficult to have him get any work done. The opposition is creating the conflict that they strive to point out.
If nobody will work with him, then that equals ineffective. I see a majority calling for his resignation and a couple of people insisting that he can stay if he wants. That may be legally true, but it won't work. His inability to function in his public role trumps his legal standing. The opposition seems to be virtually everybody. I don't have a vested interest - I live in the City - I just have my opinion.
Gnu

Charlottesville, VA

#102 Apr 30, 2013
Wonder if McDnnell will ask for investigation on him to be dropped...LOL !!!
Bollocks

Stone Mountain, GA

#103 Apr 30, 2013
CvilleMechEngr wrote:
<quoted text>
If nobody will work with him, then that equals ineffective. I see a majority calling for his resignation and a couple of people insisting that he can stay if he wants. That may be legally true, but it won't work. His inability to function in his public role trumps his legal standing. The opposition seems to be virtually everybody. I don't have a vested interest - I live in the City - I just have my opinion.
If nobody will work with him, then THEY are being ineffective, not Dumler. I'm surprised you didn't do a double take on that after writing it.

Not sure how it won't legally work, the law is on his side, and it doesn't matter if there are a billion people calling for his resignation, that's not the way the judicial system works, and they know it. They just want to convince a confused population through loud noises and boisterous exclamations that they are telling the truth.

If they want him gone, they'd better cough up the evidence, and I'd rely more on evidence that he somehow has been unable to do his job rather than claims that he's a rapist, because there's enough people who recognize that as a load of hogwash to discount it right out of hand.

Since: Apr 13

Elkton, VA

#104 May 1, 2013
CvilleMechEngr wrote:
<quoted text>
You just do not get it, or you just can't read. I have nothing to let go of. I have no opinion on your criminal stuff. I was only talking about what Dumler should do: quit.
Quitting is MUCH different than the process here...where people are trying to force him out on allegations which don't fit within the four corners of the language in the statute.

I couldn't care less whether Dumler chooses to quit, but I do care about whether the process being used to attempt to eject the man falls within the confines of the law...and so far, it has not,.

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