Wolf hunting: for or against?

Wolf hunting: for or against?

There are 41 comments on the WLUC-TV Negaunee story from Nov 8, 2012, titled Wolf hunting: for or against?. In it, WLUC-TV Negaunee reports that:

The Natural Resources, Environment, and Great Lakes Committee passed Senate Bill 1350, removing wolves from the protected non-game animal list in Michigan, a stepping stone toward a wolf hunting season Read more: Local , Politics , Environment , Outdoors , Tourism , Sports , Legal , Hunting , Wolf , Wolves , Season , Senate , Bill 1350 , Passes , ... (more)

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WLUC-TV Negaunee.

hunters are COWARDS

Virginia Beach, VA

#21 Jun 12, 2013
FaithUSA wrote:
<quoted text>You just get off on killing for no reason because you are so impotent and powerless in your life and it is the only way to feel like you are in control.
Killing a wolf has no value to a hunter other than just killing for the sake of killing. That makes them pu*sies.
The fact is there aren't enough wolves to be opening hunting on them.
I actually own a fairly large piece of land. It cracks me up to here these douche bag hunters talking like they are men of the wilderness while they live on some sh*tty little building lot somewhere. On my land, I actively disrupt hunting activity and if I find blinds, tree stands or bait piles on my land, I destroy them. Obviously, there is a portion of the brain-dead, over-weight, drunken community of hunters that can't read the words "No Trespassing/No Hunting".
Well said. Don't waste too much time on Aquarius...he's just one of a few blood thirsty losers who trolls topix just to play silly little games and then throw a hissy fit when anyone states what the majority already knows: hunters are COWARDS ;)

KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK....here, and in the field ;)
Wade Gustafson

Saint Paul, MN

#22 Jul 29, 2013
FaithUSA wrote:
<quoted text>I'm thinking 500,000 in the lower 48
"Not so long ago, wolves roamed nearly all of the United States. Between 250,000 and 500,000 wild wolves lived in harmony with Native Americans and the rest of the ecosystem."
http://www.graywolfconservation.com/Wild_Wolv...
What do you think, Tex?
Wolves are pack animals who have their own territory in which another pack is not tolerated. If your wish of 500,000 wolves in the lower 48 were to become reality, the wolves would have to feed on women and children in suburbia. Let's get realistic here. I'm in Minnesota, we have around 2,500 wolves. There are wolf pack within an hour of the Twin Cities. If the wolf range were to expand any larger, then livestock predation would increase many times over.

“TUEBOR”

Since: Jul 11

Michigan

#23 Aug 4, 2013
Wade Gustafson wrote:
<quoted text>
Wolves are pack animals who have their own territory in which another pack is not tolerated. If your wish of 500,000 wolves in the lower 48 were to become reality, the wolves would have to feed on women and children in suburbia. Let's get realistic here. I'm in Minnesota, we have around 2,500 wolves. There are wolf pack within an hour of the Twin Cities. If the wolf range were to expand any larger, then livestock predation would increase many times over.
Who cares? We have 2 million white tail deer in Michigan. I'm guessing Minnesota is the same. The environment could handle a whole lot more wolves. Livestock predation is something ranchers have to live with. Deer take 20% of the field crops on my land. I don't bicth about that. I knew there were deer here before I bought the place.

"Since wild wolves have returned to Yellowstone, the elk and deer are stronger, the aspens and willows are healthier and the grasses taller. For example, when wolves chase elk during the hunt, the elk are forced to run faster and farther. As the elk run, their hooves aerate the soil, allowing more grasses to grow. Since the elk cannot remain stationary for too long, aspens and willows in one area are not heavily grazed, and therefore can fully recover between migrations. As with the rest of the country, coyote populations were nearly out of control in Yellowstone before the wolves returned. Now, the coyotes have been out-competed and essentially reduced by 80 percent in areas occupied by wolves. The coyotes that do remain are more skittish and wary. With fewer coyotes hunting small rodents, raptors like the eagle and osprey have more prey and are making a comeback. The endangered grizzly bears successfully steal wolf kills more often than not, thus having more food to feed their cubs. In essence, we have learned that by starting recovery at the top with predators like wolves, the whole system benefits. A wild wolf population actually makes for a stronger, healthier and more balanced ecosystem. From plant, to insect, to people... we all stand to benefit from wolves."
Wade Gustafson

Saint Paul, MN

#24 Aug 5, 2013
FaithUSA wrote:
<quoted text>Who cares? We have 2 million white tail deer in Michigan. I'm guessing Minnesota is the same. The environment could handle a whole lot more wolves. Livestock predation is something ranchers have to live with. Deer take 20% of the field crops on my land. I don't bicth about that. I knew there were deer here before I bought the place.
"Since wild wolves have returned to Yellowstone, the elk and deer are stronger, the aspens and willows are healthier and the grasses taller. For example, when wolves chase elk during the hunt, the elk are forced to run faster and farther. As the elk run, their hooves aerate the soil, allowing more grasses to grow. Since the elk cannot remain stationary for too long, aspens and willows in one area are not heavily grazed, and therefore can fully recover between migrations. As with the rest of the country, coyote populations were nearly out of control in Yellowstone before the wolves returned. Now, the coyotes have been out-competed and essentially reduced by 80 percent in areas occupied by wolves. The coyotes that do remain are more skittish and wary. With fewer coyotes hunting small rodents, raptors like the eagle and osprey have more prey and are making a comeback. The endangered grizzly bears successfully steal wolf kills more often than not, thus having more food to feed their cubs. In essence, we have learned that by starting recovery at the top with predators like wolves, the whole system benefits. A wild wolf population actually makes for a stronger, healthier and more balanced ecosystem. From plant, to insect, to people... we all stand to benefit from wolves."
I'm sure the UP could handle more timberwolves. I'm not so certain they would be welcome in southern Michigan. Wolves are pack animals and have a large territory. There is not enough wilderness in the eastern U.S. for every state to have thousands of timberwolves living there.

“TUEBOR”

Since: Jul 11

Michigan

#25 Aug 5, 2013
Wade Gustafson wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sure the UP could handle more timberwolves. I'm not so certain they would be welcome in southern Michigan. Wolves are pack animals and have a large territory. There is not enough wilderness in the eastern U.S. for every state to have thousands of timberwolves living there.
We can handle a lot more than we have. There are wolves in Lower Michigan. Cougars now, too (according to MDNR). The vast Majority of Lower Michigan is wilderness. LP is more than twice the size of the UP.
Wade Gustafson

Saint Paul, MN

#26 Aug 9, 2013
FaithUSA wrote:
<quoted text>We can handle a lot more than we have. There are wolves in Lower Michigan. Cougars now, too (according to MDNR). The vast Majority of Lower Michigan is wilderness. LP is more than twice the size of the UP.
I always assumed the majority of open space in lower Michigan was farmland.

Since: May 12

Location hidden

#27 Aug 10, 2013
Blast all wolves and coyotes and rattlesnakes

“Evolved hunter/gatherer”

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#28 Dec 23, 2013
FaithUSA wrote:
<quoted text>Who cares? We have 2 million white tail deer in Michigan. I'm guessing Minnesota is the same.."
In your post #17, you claimed there are only 1 million Whitetails in Michigan. Here, just a few posts later your guessed at population grew to 2 million Whitetails in Michigan.
Interesting.
Maybe you should actually look up what the population is and stop guessing.

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

SE Michigan

#29 Dec 27, 2013
FaithUSA wrote:
<quoted text>We can handle a lot more than we have. There are wolves in Lower Michigan. Cougars now, too (according to MDNR). The vast Majority of Lower Michigan is wilderness. LP is more than twice the size of the UP.
Cougars according to the Raptor too! I saw a cougar along I75 on the way up north last summer. It was late at night. My headlights hit it as it walked along the edge of the woods between mile markers 206 and 207. I was doing 75mph so couldn't stop quickly for a picture. I know what I saw...biggest cat I've ever seen in my life- all tan/brown in color.

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

SE Michigan

#30 Dec 27, 2013
Wade Gustafson wrote:
<quoted text>
I always assumed the majority of open space in lower Michigan was farmland.
Lower Michigan does have a lot of farms. But (especially northern lower MI) is very heavily forested. God's Country as some call it!

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

SE Michigan

#31 Dec 27, 2013
Jusy_Sayn wrote:
Blast all wolves and coyotes and rattlesnakes
Grow up!!

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

SE Michigan

#32 Dec 27, 2013
Aquarius-WY wrote:
<quoted text>
In your post #17, you claimed there are only 1 million Whitetails in Michigan. Here, just a few posts later your guessed at population grew to 2 million Whitetails in Michigan.
Interesting.
Maybe you should actually look up what the population is and stop guessing.
Maybe the population grew that much since her last post...probably because of not enough wolves!!:)

“Evolved hunter/gatherer”

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#33 Dec 27, 2013
Raptor in Michigan wrote:
<quoted text>
Maybe the population grew that much since her last post...probably because of not enough wolves!!:)
Yeah, two legged ones.

You ever hear of an "Eagle Take Permit" as it relates to wind farms?

“TUEBOR”

Since: Jul 11

Michigan

#34 Dec 30, 2013
Aquarius-WY wrote:
<quoted text>
In your post #17, you claimed there are only 1 million Whitetails in Michigan. Here, just a few posts later your guessed at population grew to 2 million Whitetails in Michigan.
Interesting.
Maybe you should actually look up what the population is and stop guessing.
No, I'd rather keep guessing if it's all the same to you. There's 3 million.

“TUEBOR”

Since: Jul 11

Michigan

#35 Dec 30, 2013
Raptor in Michigan wrote:
<quoted text>
Maybe the population grew that much since her last post...probably because of not enough wolves!!:)
Hey! Merry Christmas you.

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

SE Michigan

#36 Jan 1, 2014
Aquarius-WY wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah, two legged ones.
You ever hear of an "Eagle Take Permit" as it relates to wind farms?
Yes. It means wind farms get a pass on the thousands of protected eagles that get slaughtered by wind turbines each year; A pass that no oil company would ever get.

Why don't wind farms get "nocturnal migrant permits" for the thousands, potentially millions, of small protected songbirds that they have killed/will kill in the future?

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

SE Michigan

#37 Jan 1, 2014
FaithUSA wrote:
<quoted text>Hey! Merry Christmas you.
Merry Christmas to you. Happy New Year too.

“TUEBOR”

Since: Jul 11

Michigan

#38 Jan 2, 2014
Raptor in Michigan wrote:
<quoted text>
Merry Christmas to you. Happy New Year too.
Have you noticed there are far fewer crows, blue jays and cardinals? Is that just me...or has that West Nile thing done it?

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

SE Michigan

#39 Jan 2, 2014
FaithUSA wrote:
<quoted text>Have you noticed there are far fewer crows, blue jays and cardinals? Is that just me...or has that West Nile thing done it?
I haven't seen many West Nile victims here in quite some time. I'm thinking they've pretty much built up an immunity to it. Though about ten years ago, I was worried BIGTIME that birds would be mostly wiped out from it. My Goldfinches and House Finches got hit really hard back then. So much so that I had to walk my yard and search for dead birds before I could let my dogs outside everyday. I don't worry much about it anymore.

As for the noticeable numbers of the species you mention...populations can fluctuate from one year to the next. When I was a volunteer hawk counter at Lake Erie Metropark (and even as a casual observer on other visits), we would see huge numbers of migrating Blue Jays and crows, sometimes in the tens of thousands each day.

I have no doubt that birds are smarter than what people give them credit for. If those birds sensed a hard winter coming, like it appears is happening, they may have migrated in larger than normal numbers this year.

I've never heard of, or seen, cardinals migrating. But so many people feed birds nowadays that it's possible your neighbors feeders have attracted some of "your" cardinals. That's why you see fewer- maybe.

I drove out to Lapeer County on Christmas day photographing ice that was left on the trees from the storm five days earlier. It was SOO beautiful! I pulled into the rest stop along I69 and found a tree that had unfrozen Catkins. There were a bunch of cardinals feeding on them that day. I think they are fine.

The day of the Christmas bird count was snowing really hard and visibility pretty much sucked, so I don't rely on those numbers.

What I DO worry about is the birds that show declines year after year after year, like many of our neotropical migrants. Some of the warblers, vireos, thrushes, buntings, tanagers, cuckoos, sparrows, etc. Some have declined 60%- 80% or more during the past 40 years. THAT is something we should worry about.

“TUEBOR”

Since: Jul 11

Michigan

#40 Jan 2, 2014
Raptor in Michigan wrote:
<quoted text>
I haven't seen many West Nile victims here in quite some time. I'm thinking they've pretty much built up an immunity to it. Though about ten years ago, I was worried BIGTIME that birds would be mostly wiped out from it. My Goldfinches and House Finches got hit really hard back then. So much so that I had to walk my yard and search for dead birds before I could let my dogs outside everyday. I don't worry much about it anymore.
As for the noticeable numbers of the species you mention...populations can fluctuate from one year to the next. When I was a volunteer hawk counter at Lake Erie Metropark (and even as a casual observer on other visits), we would see huge numbers of migrating Blue Jays and crows, sometimes in the tens of thousands each day.
I have no doubt that birds are smarter than what people give them credit for. If those birds sensed a hard winter coming, like it appears is happening, they may have migrated in larger than normal numbers this year.
I've never heard of, or seen, cardinals migrating. But so many people feed birds nowadays that it's possible your neighbors feeders have attracted some of "your" cardinals. That's why you see fewer- maybe.
I drove out to Lapeer County on Christmas day photographing ice that was left on the trees from the storm five days earlier. It was SOO beautiful! I pulled into the rest stop along I69 and found a tree that had unfrozen Catkins. There were a bunch of cardinals feeding on them that day. I think they are fine.
The day of the Christmas bird count was snowing really hard and visibility pretty much sucked, so I don't rely on those numbers.
What I DO worry about is the birds that show declines year after year after year, like many of our neotropical migrants. Some of the warblers, vireos, thrushes, buntings, tanagers, cuckoos, sparrows, etc. Some have declined 60%- 80% or more during the past 40 years. THAT is something we should worry about.
You know, I sold some of my land to a farmer and he just wiped out the trees that I had kind of thinned and nurtured over many years. That took them an afternoon. They came there with bulldozers. I Just can't imagine doing that.

I guess I should not worry about the crows. I'm sure they'll be here a long time after us.

When I was a kid, there was nothing but Mallards on the Lake. I don't know if you remember... I never...ever saw a Canada Goose. Now, I don't where the Mallards went off to, but the geese filled their place.

Anyhow, drove out Rochester way. It must have been the same day you were in Lapeer. The trees were candy-coated with ice and the sun was shining. It was quite a sight.

Enjoy the weather. I heat it's warming up tomorrow. It's going to be sunny and 1.

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