Milfoil plan to limit lake use

An aquatic herbicide known as Diquat will be deployed in Pontoosuc Lake today and in Onota Lake next Monday in an ongoing effort to curb the growth of Eurasian milfoil. Full Story
There here

AOL

#1 Jun 2, 2010
was just on Pontoosuc Lake and the weeds are at the top of the water already in most spots.
Hmmmmm

Albany, NY

#2 Jun 2, 2010
The drawdown cannot be healthy for the fish but what else can they do?
Bart

Williamstown, MA

#3 Jun 2, 2010
Harvest the weeds, compost them, and then sell the dirt.
LOPA

Springfield, MA

#4 Jun 2, 2010
LOPA is dumb. They clearly know *nothing* about milfoil.

You cannot draw down and freeze milfoil and expect it to work. The ONLY way to effectively remove milfoil is to pull it out from the roots. Even then, if tiny pieces break off, this will eventually seed and grow again. By drawing down the lakes, all they are doing is creating a much smaller pool that an entire lake full of fish are forced to fight for survival, it's already depleted of oxygen as the ice is too thick/snow coverage doesn't allow enough sun penetration to keep whatever vegetation alive to produce oxygen.

Chemically treating the lake is bad for fish, but clearly recreation wins out over animal life in this case. While Onota/Pontoosuc are large enough that the chemicals don't produce the same MASSIVE fish kills that occur on the large pond of Cheshire/Hoosac Lake, it still kills fish.

Bart has an excellent idea, but these weeds grow at an alarming rate and I'm sure there would be incredible amounts of hoops to jump through to obtain some sort of permit to do this making it just about impossible. All the while LOPA can dump 'legal' poison into a body of water without much trouble.

Manual removal/Machine removal with a bi-yearly herbicide treatment would be much less stressful and devastating on the ecosystem within the lake than continual draw downs & yearly poisoning.
Hidden Agenda

North Adams, MA

#5 Jun 2, 2010
LOPA wrote:
LOPA is dumb. They clearly know *nothing* about milfoil.
You cannot draw down and freeze milfoil and expect it to work. The ONLY way to effectively remove milfoil is to pull it out from the roots. Even then, if tiny pieces break off, this will eventually seed and grow again. By drawing down the lakes, all they are doing is creating a much smaller pool that an entire lake full of fish are forced to fight for survival, it's already depleted of oxygen as the ice is too thick/snow coverage doesn't allow enough sun penetration to keep whatever vegetation alive to produce oxygen.
Chemically treating the lake is bad for fish, but clearly recreation wins out over animal life in this case. While Onota/Pontoosuc are large enough that the chemicals don't produce the same MASSIVE fish kills that occur on the large pond of Cheshire/Hoosac Lake, it still kills fish.
Bart has an excellent idea, but these weeds grow at an alarming rate and I'm sure there would be incredible amounts of hoops to jump through to obtain some sort of permit to do this making it just about impossible. All the while LOPA can dump 'legal' poison into a body of water without much trouble.
Manual removal/Machine removal with a bi-yearly herbicide treatment would be much less stressful and devastating on the ecosystem within the lake than continual draw downs & yearly poisoning.
I agree totally with you. LOPA is only out for the land owners around the lake and the boats they drive. They are not interested in ecology, biology, the effects of harmful chemicals in the lake, and so on. Just get the weeds away from my yard no matter how many fish, turtles, birds, and other animals they kill. Yes birds! They eat the dead fish that the chemicals kill including the bald eagles that have nested there.

Some day a fisherman will buy a house on that lake and decide that what they are doing is wrong. They are destroying a world class fishery! For what? So they can paddle their "crew" boats around.
Jim

Housatonic, MA

#6 Jun 2, 2010
Get a clue there has never been a massive or any other kind of fish kill on cheshire lake because of treating the weeds.!!!!!
LOPA wrote:
LOPA is dumb. They clearly know *nothing* about milfoil.
You cannot draw down and freeze milfoil and expect it to work. The ONLY way to effectively remove milfoil is to pull it out from the roots. Even then, if tiny pieces break off, this will eventually seed and grow again. By drawing down the lakes, all they are doing is creating a much smaller pool that an entire lake full of fish are forced to fight for survival, it's already depleted of oxygen as the ice is too thick/snow coverage doesn't allow enough sun penetration to keep whatever vegetation alive to produce oxygen.
Chemically treating the lake is bad for fish, but clearly recreation wins out over animal life in this case. While Onota/Pontoosuc are large enough that the chemicals don't produce the same MASSIVE fish kills that occur on the large pond of Cheshire/Hoosac Lake, it still kills fish.
Bart has an excellent idea, but these weeds grow at an alarming rate and I'm sure there would be incredible amounts of hoops to jump through to obtain some sort of permit to do this making it just about impossible. All the while LOPA can dump 'legal' poison into a body of water without much trouble.
Manual removal/Machine removal with a bi-yearly herbicide treatment would be much less stressful and devastating on the ecosystem within the lake than continual draw downs & yearly poisoning.
The Native

Great Barrington, MA

#7 Jun 2, 2010
LOPA wrote:
LOPA is dumb. They clearly know *nothing* about milfoil.

Chemically treating the lake is bad for fish, but clearly recreation wins out over animal life in this case. While Onota/Pontoosuc are large enough that the chemicals don't produce the same MASSIVE fish kills that occur on the large pond of Cheshire/Hoosac Lake, it still kills fish.

Manual removal/Machine removal with a bi-yearly herbicide treatment would be much less stressful and devastating on the ecosystem within the lake than continual draw downs & yearly poisoning.
Well said!

If these people really did a aquatic survey for the past ten years of Onota. Maybe they would realize how bad the the cure is for the native fish. Check of the stocking program for the lakes.


Take a look at the fishing pier area for example.The only fish there are stocked which costs more money then maintaining a health lake. I have to go out of town to have good fishing after the weed kills happen.

Why you ask?

It is simple,ESOX fisherman and woman take pride in fishing and if we can't do it here we go elsewhere.

Esox also known Northern Pike/ Muskie
Their coloration is typically grey-green with a mottled or spotted appearance with stripes along its back, perfectly camouflaged among weeds. Individual pike marking patterns are unique, like fingerprints.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esox

This is just one of the native sport fish that you people kill off when you kill the weeds.

This is fact people, not the fiction that poison is "safe".
Poison is poison no matter the the form or concentration. The solution is not buy dilution. Think people read the MSDS on this stuff. Our lakes our the poster child for catch and release now. There should be signs saying;

PLEASE DON'T EAT THE FISH!

Do you people really think that the poison is not taken in buy the fish.
Well Barney put your bullet back in your pocket and find a better "soul"-u-tion to make the Ski-boats and Sail-boats happy.

Do some more research people, before you kill off the ecosystem in the lakes.

Aquatic plants exhibit a wide variety of morphological and physiological adaptations that allow them to survive, compete and diversify these environments. For example, the roots and stems develop large cellular air spaces to allow for the efficient transportation gases (for example, CO2 and O2) used in respiration and photosynthesis. In drained soil, microorganisms use oxygen during respiration. In aquatic environments, anaerobic soil microorganisms use nitrate, manganic ions, ferric ions, sulfate, carbon dioxide and some organic compounds. The activity of soil microorganisms and the chemistry of the water reduces the oxidation-reduction potentials of the water. Carbon dioxide, for example, is reduced to methane (CH4) by methanogenic bacteria. Which enturn support a varity of insects and fish as part of the local food chain for that area.

This poison that they put in OUR lakes builds up in the ecosystem and is pasted to the animals that eat fish!

Hmm, The Bald Eagles eat fish.

I will leave you with that thought.
The Native

Great Barrington, MA

#8 Jun 2, 2010
Some of you might want to re-read this artical and the follow-ups to it.

MCLA students examine Pontoosuc's algae plague

Author: Nicole Sequino, Berkshire Eagle Staff
Article ID: 3100756
Date: October 9, 2005
Publication: Berkshire Eagle, The (Pittsfield, MA)

Sunday, October 09 LANESBOROUGH —An environmental studies class from Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts cruised Pontoosuc Lake in pontoon boats last week, searching for clues about the cause of excessive algae and weed growth.

Fourteen students examined the oxygen density in samples of water taken from different depths, some as far as 30 feet below the water's surface, using scientific tools and equipment under the supervision of Professor Elena
FJoe

United States

#10 Jun 2, 2010
LOPA wrote:
LOPA is dumb. They clearly know *nothing* about milfoil.
You cannot draw down and freeze milfoil and expect it to work. The ONLY way to effectively remove milfoil is to pull it out from the roots.
I agree - but they need to take the additional step of limiting the milfoil food. Anyone surrounding the lake should not be allowed to use lawn fertilizer and if there are any septic systems grandfathered in, they should be forced to hook up to city sewer.
coonass

Pittsfield, MA

#11 Jun 2, 2010
And they claim that the Zebra mussels are bad for the lake!!!!
Dead Fish

Williamstown, MA

#12 Jun 2, 2010
They killed off most of the smelt in Onota a few years ago doing this WEED eradication.
LOPA

Springfield, MA

#13 Jun 3, 2010
Jim wrote:
Get a clue there has never been a massive or any other kind of fish kill on cheshire lake because of treating the weeds.!!!!!<quoted text>
Jim, I sure hope you are joking. There was an article in the Eagle (that's how large the fish kill was..for the Eagle to take notice?) last spring about concerned residents & anglers over the large amounts of dead pan fish on the shores of Cheshire Lake, ironically, around this time of the year. Have you driven down RT8 lately? Haven't you noticed that pungent odor that somehow creeps it's way into your vehicle even though your windows are shut? It's the same odor that has been a yearly LATE spring visitor at Cheshire. That smell is called PAN FISH. Walk the Ashuwillitook trail and pay close attention to the shore lines. Look at the piles upon piles of Blue Gill & Pumpkin seed with a bass thrown in here and there. This years fish kill is no where near as large as last years. In fact last years fish kill was so large, if you couldn't find a way to get accustomed to the odor, you had to leave.

Whoever the Eagle interviewed, claimed that this was NORMAL winter die-off. Never heard of such a thing. Cheshire Lake doesn't experience the same kind of die-off in the winter as other lakes. Reason being is that the 2 smaller basins are so heavily weeded that large amounts survive the winter and help produce oxygen, while the dying weeds will consume oxygen, Cheshire is a known active lake in the winter should you have some knowledge of ice fishing.

As for the large basin, the inlet pipe that runs from the middle basin into the large basin produces a LOT of current & surface agitation, this also helps a lot with oxygenating the water, not to mention a fair amount of weeds still survive the poison & winter months. From my ice fishing experience (and this is only my opinion & I have no scientific data whatsoever), the bass/pike & panfish I catch in Cheshire are the healthiest looking fish over the winter months compared to Pontoosuc & Onota which are drawn down and poisoned heavily every year.

I'm sorry but poisoning the lakes is not the answer, as for fertilizer feeding the milfoil, sure the ferts do not help the problem at all, but neither do leaky septics & fish poop. There is no way to starve the milfoil of nutrients without damaging life in the lake.

Mid summer manual/machine removal is the best solution with taking animal life into consideration. Most fish fry have grown and moved from the milfoil that provide a 'safe' habitat for them. Get a couple weeks into the summer and these machines/manual removal can go to work far more effectively than poison (sorry...herbicide). Quick observations can determine where fish fry are in the lake and which patches of milfoil they are in should the removal need to be started in early spring, you can leave selective patches of milfoil until summer.
Jim

Easthampton, MA

#14 Jun 3, 2010
Yea and the poison throws the fish up on the rail trail and surrounding lawns. I think you should read the DEP's report on the dying fish before you open your mouth.Also poison has not been used in Onota or Pontoosuc yet.
LOPA wrote:
<quoted text>
Jim, I sure hope you are joking. There was an article in the Eagle (that's how large the fish kill was..for the Eagle to take notice?) last spring about concerned residents & anglers over the large amounts of dead pan fish on the shores of Cheshire Lake, ironically, around this time of the year. Have you driven down RT8 lately? Haven't you noticed that pungent odor that somehow creeps it's way into your vehicle even though your windows are shut? It's the same odor that has been a yearly LATE spring visitor at Cheshire. That smell is called PAN FISH. Walk the Ashuwillitook trail and pay close attention to the shore lines. Look at the piles upon piles of Blue Gill & Pumpkin seed with a bass thrown in here and there. This years fish kill is no where near as large as last years. In fact last years fish kill was so large, if you couldn't find a way to get accustomed to the odor, you had to leave.
Whoever the Eagle interviewed, claimed that this was NORMAL winter die-off. Never heard of such a thing. Cheshire Lake doesn't experience the same kind of die-off in the winter as other lakes. Reason being is that the 2 smaller basins are so heavily weeded that large amounts survive the winter and help produce oxygen, while the dying weeds will consume oxygen, Cheshire is a known active lake in the winter should you have some knowledge of ice fishing.
As for the large basin, the inlet pipe that runs from the middle basin into the large basin produces a LOT of current & surface agitation, this also helps a lot with oxygenating the water, not to mention a fair amount of weeds still survive the poison & winter months. From my ice fishing experience (and this is only my opinion & I have no scientific data whatsoever), the bass/pike & panfish I catch in Cheshire are the healthiest looking fish over the winter months compared to Pontoosuc & Onota which are drawn down and poisoned heavily every year.
I'm sorry but poisoning the lakes is not the answer, as for fertilizer feeding the milfoil, sure the ferts do not help the problem at all, but neither do leaky septics & fish poop. There is no way to starve the milfoil of nutrients without damaging life in the lake.
Mid summer manual/machine removal is the best solution with taking animal life into consideration. Most fish fry have grown and moved from the milfoil that provide a 'safe' habitat for them. Get a couple weeks into the summer and these machines/manual removal can go to work far more effectively than poison (sorry...herbicide). Quick observations can determine where fish fry are in the lake and which patches of milfoil they are in should the removal need to be started in early spring, you can leave selective patches of milfoil until summer.
Jim

Easthampton, MA

#15 Jun 3, 2010
Also you say you ice fish. Back when the lake was weed chocked your bait would die in the hole because there was no oxygen. The only difference is the other two lakes are so weed choked that the dead fish can not make it to the surface or the shore.Winter fish kill has been there forever and will always be there.I have been on the lake for over fifty years and it has been there as long as I can remember.When I was young there were no weeds in Cheshire lake how did the fish survive then ? But there was always winter kill.
Big Pike

Springfield, MA

#16 Jun 3, 2010
Jim wrote:
Also you say you ice fish. Back when the lake was weed chocked your bait would die in the hole because there was no oxygen. The only difference is the other two lakes are so weed choked that the dead fish can not make it to the surface or the shore.Winter fish kill has been there forever and will always be there.I have been on the lake for over fifty years and it has been there as long as I can remember.When I was young there were no weeds in Cheshire lake how did the fish survive then ? But there was always winter kill.
You are so wrong about this. You shouldn't make comments that can't be backed by facts.
Do NOT Trust DEP

Springfield, MA

#17 Jun 3, 2010
Jim wrote:
Also you say you ice fish. Back when the lake was weed chocked your bait would die in the hole because there was no oxygen. The only difference is the other two lakes are so weed choked that the dead fish can not make it to the surface or the shore.Winter fish kill has been there forever and will always be there.I have been on the lake for over fifty years and it has been there as long as I can remember.When I was young there were no weeds in Cheshire lake how did the fish survive then ? But there was always winter kill.
You are so FULL OF $#!T your eyes are brown.
nana

Agadir, Morocco

#18 Jun 4, 2010
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