Run,Run, Run, The Republicans are Com...
Fwank

United States

#1368 Jun 8, 2013
Sheeple idiots are destroying this great nation. Stupid liberals are out of control.
ZCs

New York, NY

#1369 Jun 15, 2013
RUN, RUN, RUN!!!!!!!!!!

The Republicans are Coming!!

Run!!!!!!!!!!

Since Republicans took control of Congress in the 2010 elections, they have provoked a series of budget crises, all justified by what they claimed was the extraordinary, Greece-esque threat of a runaway budget deficit. The shrinking of the budget deficit has made it harder and harder to rationalize the hair-on-fire mania required to justify threats like refusing to raise the debt ceiling.

I’ve been wondering how Republicans in Congress would acknowledge this development. The answer seems to be: by moving the goalposts back. Waaaay back — like, another twenty years back. Manu Raju and John Bresnahan report that the latest hang-up is that Senate Republicans are demanding that budget talks use a 30-year timeline.(Keep in mind that the Senate is the “moderate” of the congressional GOP — House Republicans aren’t even talking to Obama.) This is actually pretty astonishing:

White House chief of staff Denis McDonough privately met with more than a dozen Senate Republicans who outlined their view of the budget picture over the next three decades instead of over the 10-year window used by administration number crunchers, according to attendees …

Rather than typical budgets that show 10-year windows,[Senator Ron ] Johnson laid out government revenue and spending projections covering three decades. The Wisconsin Republican argued that using a 30-year window would depict a more accurate picture of the growth of entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security. One source pegged the budget gap growing from $70 trillion to $120 trillion over the next three decades, depending on the assumptions.

Basically, the crisis they’ve been decrying is looking solvable, so they’re redefining it in a way that it’s not solvable.
truth

Bronx, NY

#1370 Jun 15, 2013
RUN RUN RUN wrote:
Mr. Weatherbee and his so obvious 'in the closet' post.
http://www.topix.com/forum/nyc/T34FVKA1IFPOQQ...
Dr. Smith has another maniacal meltdown;
http://www.topix.com/forum/nyc/T45NPO7JP24SH8...
Post #11662
truth

Bronx, NY

#1371 Jun 15, 2013
ZCs wrote:
RUN, RUN, RUN!!!!!!!!!!
The Republicans are Coming!!
Run!!!!!!!!!!
Since Republicans took control of Congress in the 2010 elections, they have provoked a series of budget crises, all justified by what they claimed was the extraordinary, Greece-esque threat of a runaway budget deficit. The shrinking of the budget deficit has made it harder and harder to rationalize the hair-on-fire mania required to justify threats like refusing to raise the debt ceiling.
I’ve been wondering how Republicans in Congress would acknowledge this development. The answer seems to be: by moving the goalposts back. Waaaay back — like, another twenty years back. Manu Raju and John Bresnahan report that the latest hang-up is that Senate Republicans are demanding that budget talks use a 30-year timeline.(Keep in mind that the Senate is the “moderate” of the congressional GOP — House Republicans aren’t even talking to Obama.) This is actually pretty astonishing:
White House chief of staff Denis McDonough privately met with more than a dozen Senate Republicans who outlined their view of the budget picture over the next three decades instead of over the 10-year window used by administration number crunchers, according to attendees …
Rather than typical budgets that show 10-year windows,[Senator Ron ] Johnson laid out government revenue and spending projections covering three decades. The Wisconsin Republican argued that using a 30-year window would depict a more accurate picture of the growth of entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security. One source pegged the budget gap growing from $70 trillion to $120 trillion over the next three decades, depending on the assumptions.
Basically, the crisis they’ve been decrying is looking solvable, so they’re redefining it in a way that it’s not solvable.
Stupid Republicans are destroying this country.
Conservative Teabagger nut Loons extremists are out of control.
truth

Bronx, NY

#1372 Jun 15, 2013
ZCs wrote:
Run!!!!!!!!!!
Sen. Lindsey Graham is doing it!!!!!!!!!!
Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Monday became the latest Republican to reject Darrell Issa's comments that White House press secretary Jay Carney is a "paid liar" in relation to the IRS controversy. But Graham went further than his Republican colleagues, saying there's no evidence that the White House ordered the tax agency to target conservative groups.
During an interview with "Kilmeade and Friends" on Fox News Radio, Graham said Issa, a California Republican, was a key player in investigating the matter as the chairman of the House Oversight Committee. But, he conceded, "you can go too far" with personal allegations.
"Let's not make it personal. Jay Carney is not the issue here. He's the spokesman for the White House," Graham told host Brian Kilmeade, adding that it "never helps" to resort to personal name-calling.
On Sunday, Issa accused the White House of ordering the IRS to target conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status in 2012, even though a 48-page report by the IRS Inspector General and testimony from multiple IRS officials cleared the White House of any involvement. Issa has nonetheless insisted IRS agents were being "ordered from Washington." He specifically directed his criticism at Carney, who has maintained the administration played no role in the targeting and only learned of the matter once an investigation was complete.
Both of them are A-Holes.
ZCs

New York, NY

#1373 Jun 21, 2013
Run, Run, Run!!!!

The Republicans are Coming!

Run!!!!!!!!!!

The most tangible and politically significant (some have called it monumental) thing that came out of the conservative movement's unstinting preparation for Hillary Clinton to be the Democratic Party's standard-bearer in the 2008 presidential election was the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision.

It was Citizens United's film attacking Hillary Clinton that was at the core of the Supreme Court's ruling.

Last year, I wrote about how the Citizens United case came to be:

In 2007, David Bossie's Citizens United was gearing up for what it was certain would be Clinton's historic run for the presidency. "

Fo r years, CU's toolbox had been filled with an assortment of material -- misinformation, disinformation, and egregious lies -- used to attack both President [Bill] Clinton and Hillary. Now CU was attempting to marshal the resources for the mother of all anti-Hillary hit pieces.

The controversial 
Bossie, president and Chairman of the Board of Citizens United, "acknowledged that he was inspired by the success of Michael Moore's films, saying that he '... saw the impact Moore was having....[and] realized the long-form documentary could be a powerful tool to deliver a political message.'

"Bossie and his partner, the veteran Swift Boater, Floyd Brown, came up with the idea of making a full-length documentary film about Hillary. The film would ... reveal all the secrets about her sordid past that the American public either had forgotten or did not know.

"The movie, titled 'Hillary: The Movie,' was set to 'explode onto the scene' Citizens United's web site proclaimed. Produced by Bossie, the author of the 'Hillary: The Politics of Personal Destruction,' the film contained more than 40 interviews 'with experts, opinion makers, and many of the people who personally locked horns with the Clintons.'

"Citizens United prepared several short ads for the film that were set to run on television as political advertisements.

"According to Esquire [magazine's Charles P.] Pierce, the 'film about Hillary Clinton ... was pretty much as spurious as most of the work [Bossie had] done in his entire career, and a court ruled that the advertising for the film violated existing campaign laws about 'electioneering' within 30 days of a primary. In 2004, Bossie and Citizens United had sued on precisely those grounds, arguing that ads for Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 911 violated the same laws. He had lost that case. In the interim, he recast his organization as a legitimate filmmaking operation and so, when a lower court ruled against him, he was ready with the argument that convinced [Justice Anthony] Kennedy and four of his brethren.'"
truth

Bronx, NY

#1374 Jun 21, 2013
ZCs wrote:
Run, Run, Run!!!!
The Republicans are Coming!
Run!!!!!!!!!!
The most tangible and politically significant (some have called it monumental) thing that came out of the conservative movement's unstinting preparation for Hillary Clinton to be the Democratic Party's standard-bearer in the 2008 presidential election was the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision.
It was Citizens United's film attacking Hillary Clinton that was at the core of the Supreme Court's ruling.
Last year, I wrote about how the Citizens United case came to be:
In 2007, David Bossie's Citizens United was gearing up for what it was certain would be Clinton's historic run for the presidency. "

Fo r years, CU's toolbox had been filled with an assortment of material -- misinformation, disinformation, and egregious lies -- used to attack both President [Bill] Clinton and Hillary. Now CU was attempting to marshal the resources for the mother of all anti-Hillary hit pieces.
The controversial 
Bossie, president and Chairman of the Board of Citizens United, "acknowledged that he was inspired by the success of Michael Moore's films, saying that he '... saw the impact Moore was having....[and] realized the long-form documentary could be a powerful tool to deliver a political message.'
"Bossie and his partner, the veteran Swift Boater, Floyd Brown, came up with the idea of making a full-length documentary film about Hillary. The film would ... reveal all the secrets about her sordid past that the American public either had forgotten or did not know.
"The movie, titled 'Hillary: The Movie,' was set to 'explode onto the scene' Citizens United's web site proclaimed. Produced by Bossie, the author of the 'Hillary: The Politics of Personal Destruction,' the film contained more than 40 interviews 'with experts, opinion makers, and many of the people who personally locked horns with the Clintons.'
"Citizens United prepared several short ads for the film that were set to run on television as political advertisements.
"According to Esquire [magazine's Charles P.] Pierce, the 'film about Hillary Clinton ... was pretty much as spurious as most of the work [Bossie had] done in his entire career, and a court ruled that the advertising for the film violated existing campaign laws about 'electioneering' within 30 days of a primary. In 2004, Bossie and Citizens United had sued on precisely those grounds, arguing that ads for Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 911 violated the same laws. He had lost that case. In the interim, he recast his organization as a legitimate filmmaking operation and so, when a lower court ruled against him, he was ready with the argument that convinced [Justice Anthony] Kennedy and four of his brethren.'"
They wasted time and did all that for nothing.
Their boy lost and they'll continue to do so.
when

Bronx, NY

#1375 Jun 25, 2013
ZC's, when is the next Republican going to Run, Run, Run?
ZCs

New York, NY

#1376 Jun 29, 2013
Run, Run, Run!!!!!!!!!!
The Republicans are coming!!!!!!!!
Run!!!!!!!!!!
Senate Republican leaders have sent letters warning six professional sports leagues not to provide the Obama administration any assistance in promoting Obamacare.
The letters, dated June 27, warn the chiefs of the National Football League, Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, National Hockey League, Professional Golf Association and NASCAR that partnering with the administration to publicize the benefits of the health care law would damage their reputations.
“Given the divisiveness and persistent unpopularity of this bill, it is difficult to understand why an organization like yours would risk damaging its inclusive and apolitical brand by lending its name to its promotion,” wrote Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Minority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX).
The letters come days after Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said she’s spoken with the NFL about potentially partnering to let people know the benefits of the Affordable Care Act ahead of the implementation of its major components.(She said there was no deal yet.) The Republican senators rattled off a slew of conservative arguments against the law, stressing polls that signal its unpopularity with the public.
The letter also suggests the Obama administration could be threatening the pro sports leagues to extract support for Obamacare:
We have long been concerned by the Obama Administration’s record of using the threat of policy retaliation to solicit support for its policies or to silence its critics. Should the administration or its allies suggest that there will be any policy consequence for your decision not to participate in their outreach efforts, we urge you to resist any such pressure and to contact us immediately so that we may conduct appropriate oversight.
Republicans have been working feverishly to gum up implementation of the Affordable Care Act. And they’ve launched investigations into HHS and Sebelius for asking health industry groups to help promote the law. The senators warned the pro sports leagues that joining forces with the administration on an issue like this would be unprecedented.
“It is difficult for us to remember another occasion when major sports league took public sides in such a highly polarized public debate,” McConnell and Cornyn wrote.“Yet given this administration’s public request of your assistance in promoting this unpopular law, we felt it important to provide you with a fuller accounting of the facts before you made such a decision.”
An HHS spokesperson declined to comment on the letters. The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Democratic aides point out that it’s nothing new for political leaders to partner with private organizations on behalf of their constituents, citing as one example the 2007 partnership between Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and the Boston Red Sox to promote Romneycare. McConnell and Cornyn argued in their letters that there were “key differences” between the two laws, observing that one was bipartisan and the other passed on a partisan vote.
ZCs

New York, NY

#1377 Jun 29, 2013
There is no time to waste!!!!!!

Run!!!!!!!!!!

A tea party group's vow to march with guns in a Fourth of July parade has caused panic in a small Colorado town.

The Southern Colorado Patriots Club announced that its members would march with guns in the annual Independence Day parade in Westcliffe, Colo. to "make a statement that we still believe in our Constitution" to protest new gun control laws in the state, the Denver Post reported. A flier distributed by the group urged members to come to the parade with unarmed rifles.

"All rifles welcome especially the evil black ones," the flier read.

The announcement prompted the Custer County Chamber of Commerce, the event's sponsor, to cancel the parade as nervous citizens circulated a petition to stop the club. Donna Hood, president of the chamber, abstained from the vote to cancel the parade but told the Post that the matter has "polarized this community in a week." The parade was ultimately saved when the Town of Westcliffe agreed to pick up the sponsorship tab.

Although the group has marched with guns in the past, the passage of new statewide gun measures has heightened public sensitivity to the action. The state's new 15-round limit on gun magazines is slated to take effect next week.
ZCs

New York, NY

#1378 Jun 29, 2013
Run!!!!!!!!!!

With changes to its unemployment law taking effect this weekend, North Carolina not only is cutting benefits for those who file new claims, it will become the first state disqualified from a federal compensation program for the long-term jobless.

State officials adopted the package of benefit cuts and increased taxes for businesses in February, a plan designed to accelerate repayment of a $2.5 billion federal debt. Like many states, North Carolina had racked up the debt by borrowing from Washington after its unemployment fund was drained by jobless benefits during the Great Recession.

The changes go into effect Sunday for North Carolina, which has the country’s fifth-worst jobless rate. The cuts on those who make unemployment claims on or after that day will disqualify the state from receiving federally funded Emergency Unemployment Compensation. That money kicks in after the state’s period of unemployment compensation — now shortened from up to six months to no more than five — runs out. The EUC program is available to long-term jobless in all states. But keeping the money flowing includes a requirement that states can’t cut average weekly benefits.

Because North Carolina leaders cut average weekly benefits for new claims, about 170,000 workers whose state benefits expire this year will lose more than $700 million in EUC payments, the U.S. Labor Department said.

Lee Creighton, 45, of Cary, said he’s been unemployed since October, and this is the last week for which he’ll get nearly $500 in unemployment aid. He said he was laid off from a position managing statisticians and writers amid the recession’s worst days in 2009 and has landed and lost a series of government and teaching jobs since then — work that paid less half as much. His parents help him buy groceries to get by.

“I’m just not sure what I’m going to do,” said Creighton, who has a doctorate.“What are we to do? Is the state prepared to have this many people with no source of income?”

With the changes to North Carolina law, state benefits will last three to five months — at the longer end when unemployment rates are higher. Qualifying for benefits becomes more difficult. Weekly payments for those collecting the current maximum benefit of $535 drop to $350, falling from the highest in the Southeast to comparable with neighboring states.

Republican leaders who control the General Assembly sought an exception to the federal law two months before voting to change unemployment benefits. Congress last year allowed Pennsylvania, Indiana, Arkansas and Rhode Island to proceed with cuts to weekly benefits that their legislatures had approved for after the expected expiration of federal benefits, which later were extended.
ZCs

New York, NY

#1379 Jul 6, 2013
Run,Run,Run!!!!!!!!!!

Run, Alison,Run!!!!!!!!

It might not be star-studded, and it's very early in the cycle, but Kentucky's Senate contest just got a lot more interesting.

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes made it official Monday that she will challenge Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, giving Democrats hope in a red state.

McConnell, the ninth most senior member of the Senate, has represented the Bluegrass State for nearly 29 years. He criticized Grimes out of the gate as "[a]ccepting the invitation from countless Washington liberals to become President Obama's Kentucky candidate."

His team has been preparing for a competitive contest for months, staffing up and readying for his challenger, whomever that would be.

Actress Ashley Judd took a pass on the race against McConnell earlier this year, in part due to pressure from people who thought Grimes, who was also backed by Bill Clinton, would be a superior candidate.
ZCs

New York, NY

#1380 Jul 13, 2013
RUN, RUN, RUN!!!!!!!!!!

Republicans in the Texas Legislature passed an omnibus abortion bill that is one of the most restrictive in the nation, but Democrats vowed Saturday to fight both in the courts and the ballot box as they used the measure to rally their supporters.

More than 2,000 demonstrators filled the Capitol building in Austin to oppose the bill, and state troopers drug six out of the Senate chamber for trying to disrupt the debate. The Republican majority ultimately passed the bill unchanged just before midnight, with all but one Democrat voting against it.

“Today the Texas Legislature took its final step in our historic effort to protect life,” said Gov. Rick Perry who will sign the bill into law in the next few days.“This legislation builds on the strong and unwavering commitment we have made to defend life and protect women’s health.”

Democrats, though, promised a fight in the courts.

“There will be a lawsuit. I promise you,” Dallas Sen. Royce West said on the Senate floor, raising his right hand as if taking an oath.

Democrats offered 20 amendments to the bill, which will ban abortions after 20 weeks, require abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital and require all abortions take place in surgical centers. They ranged from exceptions for rape and incest to allowing doctors more leeway in prescribing abortion-inducing drugs. But Republicans would have none of it.

The bill is just one of many across the nation championed by anti-abortion groups set on a constitutional challenge to Roe vs Wade, the U.S. Supreme Court decision guaranteeing a woman’s right to decide on an abortion before the fetus is viable outside the womb.

Texas falls under the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, which has shown a willingness to accept more stringent limits on abortions. Passing the law also pleases Christian conservatives who make up the majority of Republican primary voters.

But the measure has also sparked protests in Texas not seen in least 20 years, with thousands of abortion rights supporters flooding the Capitol to draw out normally boring committee hearings and disrupting key votes. Protesters finished a filibuster started by Democratic Sen. Wendy Davis of Fort Worth by jeering for the last 15 minutes of the first special session, effectively killing the bill.
ZCs

New York, NY

#1381 Jul 13, 2013
RUN!!!

The House of Representatives just passed a farm bill, which overlays a Byzantine political calculus atop what ought to be a simple policy question. Should the government subsidize business owners because their business is agriculture? The answer — even to somebody relatively friendly to government, like me — is obviously not. Running a farm is not inherently more virtuous or necessary than running a gas station or a bookstore. Farmers earn more than the average American. Washington should get out of the business of paying farmers directly (or indirectly, through price supports that drive up food costs) altogether.

The political complication that comes into play is that farm subsidies have traditionally been packaged together with food stamps. Food stamps strike me as an especially meritorious program. Giving people money because they’re so poor they struggle to eat regularly makes way, way, way more sense than giving people money because they’re in a particular (and generally lucrative) line of work. You could replace food stamps with some other kind of cash grant, but the main idea of helping people because they're poor is sound.

Historically, the two programs have passed together. There’s some policy rationale for this. Some of the farm subsidies drive up the price of food, making it harder for poor people to buy the food and thus making it more necessary to subsidize them. But the main rationale for joining food stamps is political. It gets urban liberals to vote for farm subsidies that hurt their constituents, and it gets rural conservatives to tolerate food stamps that they’d otherwise oppose. And since advocates of both farm subsidies and food stamps fear losing their program more than anything else, they strongly endorse keeping them together.

The coalition between the two has come undone in recent weeks. Why? Because under President Obama, conservatives have gone from not caring much about food stamps to detesting food stamps as the emblem of Obama’s Chicago-style urban socialist welfare dependency administration. Food stamp spending has increased, not because Obama is handing them out like candy but because the number of poor, hungry people has dramatically increased since the Great Recession.
ZCs

New York, NY

#1382 Jul 20, 2013
Run, Run, Run!!!!!!!!!!

The REPUBLICANS ARE COMING. RUN!!!!!!!!!!

RALEIGH Resurrecting one of the legislative session’s most contentious issues, Senate Republicans unveiled a new voter ID bill Thursday that would further restrict the forms of photo identification accepted at the polls.

The new measure would require voters to show one of seven types of photo identification issued by the government, such as driver’s licenses, passports, non-driver IDs and military or veteran cards.

It eliminates about half the types of photo identification allowed under the House version, including cards from UNC system colleges, state community colleges, local governments, private employers and law enforcement agencies. The bill would take full effect in the 2016 elections.

“We want a state-issued ID or a federal-issued ID,” said Sen. Tom Apodaca, the bill’s chief supporter, expressing concern that college IDs “could be manipulated” and allow out-of-state students to vote in two states.

“We want it succinct, and we are willing to pay for it,” he added, noting that the bill would provide free photo IDs to people without them.

The major rewrite came two months after the House approved its voter ID bill and a week before the session’s scheduled end. The disagreement is the latest example of the legislature’s majority party ending up divided over how to deliver on a major campaign promise.

The prohibition on college IDs will draw the most attention – particularly given President Barack Obama’s reliance on the youth vote to win North Carolina in 2008. The large number of college students in the Triangle area helped push him to victory and kept the margin of defeat close in 2012.

Emmie Horadam, a rising senior at Queens University and a Democrat, helped register Charlotte-area students to vote in the last election. On college campuses, she said, many students are more likely to carry their school ID instead of a driver’s license.“That’s what we all carry,” she said.“It’s just a lot easier.”

Neither the House version nor Senate version would allow private school college IDs, but Horadam said that should change.“It’s just one thing Republicans are trying to push through to discourage college students from voting,” she said.State Rep. David Lewis, who sponsored the House bill, said the provision allowing college IDs at the polls is “important and should remain in the ultimate bill.”

ZCs

New York, NY

#1383 Jul 20, 2013
Run!!!!!!!!!!

If there remained any doubt about the connection between American racism and “small-government conservatism,” the Tea Party-dominated House Republican majority helped remove it last week in its handling of the farm bill. The Republicans larded on extra money for agricultural subsidies benefiting mostly white-owned agribusiness and then lopped off the food-stamp program entirely. It, after all, benefits a disproportionate share of blacks and other racial minorities.

In this exercise of government favoritism for wealthy whites and cruelty toward the poor (many blacks and other minorities), the pretense of free-market economics was even stripped away. If “libertarianism” were not just a polite cover for racism, the House Republicans would have killed agricultural subsidies, too.

But the Republicans didn’t. They seemed fine with various forms of taxpayer giveaways to white-owned agribusinesses, but they were determined to inflict as much pain as possible on blacks and minorities who already have suffered the most from the Great Recession. There was even a cruel vindictiveness to the process.

In justifying the House action on food stamps, Rep. Stephen Fincher, R-Tennessee, referred to the New Testament but ignored the teachings of Jesus, who told his followers to feed the poor and care for the needy. Instead, Fincher extracted a line from Thessalonians,“The one who is unwilling to work shall not eat.”

But it turned out that the starving mandate did not apply to Fincher, who has been a recipient of several million dollars in farm subsidies, including $70,000 in direct payments in 2012 alone for doing nothing. As New York Times columnist Paul Krugman wrote on Monday,“I don’t think the word ‘hypocrisy’ does it justice.”

Obviously, the Republican mean-spirited behavior is not entirely aimed at minorities. As Krugman noted,“almost half of food stamp recipients are non-Hispanic whites” and the percentage is 63 percent in Fincher’s Tennessee district. But race remains a powerful driving force for the GOP’s behavior.

Indeed, whenever you run up against right-wing hypocrisy, it’s a safe bet that race is a factor. For instance, Tea Partiers love to go to Washington, dress up in Revolutionary War costumes and protest their taxation with representation. But they are remarkably silent about a continuation of “taxation without representation” for the residents of the District, many of whom are black.

Yes, it’s true that D.C. whites are also denied congressional representation but you can bet that if D.C. were overwhelmingly white (and right-wing) rather than substantially black (and liberal), the Tea Partiers would be screaming about the injustice of it all.
ZCs

New York, NY

#1385 Jul 26, 2013
Run, Run, Run!!!!

The Republicans are coming!!!!

Run!!!!!!!!!!

North Carolina Republicans have introduced a major overhaul of the state's election system, adding dozens of amendments to a voter ID bill that will authorize voter vigilantes, end election day registration, cut early voting, make it harder to register, and even create loony protections against "zombie voters."

"Senate leaders have taken what was already an awful voter ID bill and created a nightmarish set of anti-voting measures that is sure to keep thousands of people from voting in the state," declared Democracy North Carolina, a nonpartisan good government organization, in an email to supporters.

With the U.S. Supreme Court having gutted the federal pre-clearance requirements of the Voting Rights Act, the North Carolina legislature is now largely free to enact voter restrictions without receiving the federal government's approval. The Republican-led legislature was already expected to pass a restrictive American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC)-inspired voter ID law that threatened to disenfranchise 318,000 registered voters who don't have state-issued identification, but the new provisions were added as an amendment to that already-strict bill.

The House passed the voter ID bill requirement in April, but Senate leaders waited to add the amendments until the final week of the legislative session, and rolled-out the changes with almost no notice. The bill passed through the Senate rules committee on Tuesday, with just 10 members of the public allowed to testify. Members of the audience who applauded during the hearing were rejected from the room. "The substance and the process of this legislation demonstrate a complete disrespect of honest voters,"said Bob Hall, executive director of Democracy North Carolina.

Measures like voter ID and limits on election-day registration and early voting have been promoted as a way to prevent "voter fraud," but recent studies show that out of millions of votes cast over the last 14 years in North Carolina, there have been only two cases of suspected fraud. Do two possible cases of voter fraud justify imposing new restrictions on 318,000 registered voters who don't have ID, 155,000 voters who registered at the polls, and a majority of voters who voted early?
ZCs

New York, NY

#1386 Jul 27, 2013
Run, Run, Run!!!!!!!!!!

The Republicans are coming!!

The GOP push to hold government funding hostage to gutting Obamacare appears to be losing steam in Congress as a growing chorus of Republicans and conservative writers are coming out of the woodwork to urge hardliners within their party to be realistic.

“I think it’s the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard of,” Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) told reporters in the Capitol on Thursday.“Listen, as long as Barack Obama is president, the Affordable Care Act is going to be law.”

Republicans in the House and Senate are working to corner colleagues into withholding support for keeping government open after the lights go out on Sept. 30 unless Obamacare is defunded. And a growing number of pragmatic conservatives — in and out of Congress — recognize that’s a suicide mission that threatens the GOP’s credibility as well as its electoral prospects ahead of a promising midterm election.

In recent days, Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK), a deputy majority whip, has derided the conservative effort as a “temper tantrum” and compared it to “blackmail.” Appearing Wednesday evening on Fox News, he warned that “it is the sort of thing that creates a backlash and could cost the Republicans the majority in the House.”

Meanwhile, two well-read conservative writers — Byron York of the Washington Examiner and Ramesh Ponnuru, a columnist for Bloomberg View — put the kibosh on this plan Friday.

In an article titled “No, the GOP is not going to defund Obamacare,” York reports that Republicans privately admit they’re embarking on a fool’s errand but have to show conservatives they’re sparing no effort to fight Obamacare.

Ponnuru calls the plan “disastrous” and warns that “it will backfire.” He lists several reasons why the public “would almost certainly blame Republicans” if the government shuts down — all of which are well understood by pragmatic Republicans who witnessed the Newt Gingrich-led shutdowns of the 1990s.

In the Senate, a letter by Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) demanding Obamacare be defunded in a government funding or debt limit bill actually lost signatories, after some senators reportedly dropped off — including Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX). After initially leaking word that the letter had at least 15 signatories, the final version was released Thursday by Lee’s office with 11 GOP signatories — Sens. Lee, Marco Rubio (FL), Ted Cruz (TX), James Risch (ID), Rand Paul (KY), James Inhofe (OK), David Vitter (LA), John Thune (SD), Jeff Chiesa (NJ), Mike Enzi (WY), Deb Fischer (NE), and Chuck Grassley (IA).

“[W]e believe the only way to avert disaster is to fully repeal ObamaCare and start over with a more sensible, practical approach to reforming our healthcare system,” the letter reads.“For these reasons, we will not support any continuing resolution or appropriations legislation that funds further implementation or enforcement of ObamaCare.”

Cornyn’s office didn’t respond to requests for comment on why he dropped off. A Democratic leadership aide speculated that Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) was trying to isolate the signatories so he’s not forced to carry out their demands.
ILAL

Bronx, NY

#1387 Jul 30, 2013
Run, Run, Run.

The Republicans are going; namely Limbaugh and Hannity, the chauffers of the reichwing extremist fringe of the GOP.
Cumulus, parent company of WABC who oversees their radio programs in New York are kicking both of them off the air.
Extremist talk and incendiary commentary that turns people off along with lack of advertising dollars probably factored into the decision to send those two packing.

About time.
ILAL

Bronx, NY

#1388 Jul 30, 2013
ZCs wrote:
Run, Run, Run!!!!!!!!!!
The Republicans are coming!!
The GOP push to hold government funding hostage to gutting Obamacare appears to be losing steam in Congress as a growing chorus of Republicans and conservative writers are coming out of the woodwork to urge hardliners within their party to be realistic.
“I think it’s the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard of,” Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) told reporters in the Capitol on Thursday.“Listen, as long as Barack Obama is president, the Affordable Care Act is going to be law.”
Republicans in the House and Senate are working to corner colleagues into withholding support for keeping government open after the lights go out on Sept. 30 unless Obamacare is defunded. And a growing number of pragmatic conservatives — in and out of Congress — recognize that’s a suicide mission that threatens the GOP’s credibility as well as its electoral prospects ahead of a promising midterm election.
In recent days, Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK), a deputy majority whip, has derided the conservative effort as a “temper tantrum” and compared it to “blackmail.” Appearing Wednesday evening on Fox News, he warned that “it is the sort of thing that creates a backlash and could cost the Republicans the majority in the House.”
Meanwhile, two well-read conservative writers — Byron York of the Washington Examiner and Ramesh Ponnuru, a columnist for Bloomberg View — put the kibosh on this plan Friday.
In an article titled “No, the GOP is not going to defund Obamacare,” York reports that Republicans privately admit they’re embarking on a fool’s errand but have to show conservatives they’re sparing no effort to fight Obamacare.
Ponnuru calls the plan “disastrous” and warns that “it will backfire.” He lists several reasons why the public “would almost certainly blame Republicans” if the government shuts down — all of which are well understood by pragmatic Republicans who witnessed the Newt Gingrich-led shutdowns of the 1990s.
In the Senate, a letter by Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) demanding Obamacare be defunded in a government funding or debt limit bill actually lost signatories, after some senators reportedly dropped off — including Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX). After initially leaking word that the letter had at least 15 signatories, the final version was released Thursday by Lee’s office with 11 GOP signatories — Sens. Lee, Marco Rubio (FL), Ted Cruz (TX), James Risch (ID), Rand Paul (KY), James Inhofe (OK), David Vitter (LA), John Thune (SD), Jeff Chiesa (NJ), Mike Enzi (WY), Deb Fischer (NE), and Chuck Grassley (IA).
“[W]e believe the only way to avert disaster is to fully repeal ObamaCare and start over with a more sensible, practical approach to reforming our healthcare system,” the letter reads.“For these reasons, we will not support any continuing resolution or appropriations legislation that funds further implementation or enforcement of ObamaCare.”
Cornyn’s office didn’t respond to requests for comment on why he dropped off. A Democratic leadership aide speculated that Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) was trying to isolate the signatories so he’s not forced to carry out their demands.
They've wasted more time with this than they did addressing the needs of the country; namely employment and the country's infrastructure with legislation.
This is their 37th time trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act, the law of the land upheld by the United States Supreme Court in 2012.
The morons wasting time on this will be gone in 2014.

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