A vintage fight over wine

A vintage fight over wine

There are 13 comments on the Newsday story from Mar 8, 2009, titled A vintage fight over wine. In it, Newsday reports that:

Michael A. Lerner is the author of "Dry Manhattan: Prohibition in New York City" and dean of studies at Bard High School Early College in Manhattan.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Newsday.

Phyllis Spisto

AOL

#1 Mar 11, 2009
If wine is sold in supermarkets - it will be jug and box JUNK WINE. Now we have beautiful boutique wine shops, like mine - that cater to all wine buyers from $5.00 to $500 per bottle.

Wine in the supermarkets will put me out of business. After I am put out of business, and close my store, I will still owe rent on my lease for the remainder of the lease - 10 years - under New York Law. NYS follows the minority rule and does not require a landlord to mitigate damages and find a new tenant. I must put the business and myself personally in bankruptcy, as I personally guaranteed the commercial lease. It means I lose my home also. I also lose my ability to purchased my own health insurance, as well as health insurance for my employees - and pay their salary. We all then need unemployment insurance, medicare, medicaid, or just go to the emergency room.

This article misses the whole point of Gov. Paterson's proposing wine in supermarkets - to generate $150 Million licence fees. The industry has shown that these fees are bogus - and can be better generated by just raising the license fees to exisiting stores. HOWEVER, THE ECONOMIC LOSS TO THE EXISITING STORE OWNERS, THEIR EMPLOYEES, LOSS OF INCOME, LOSS OF RENTS TO LANDLORDS, EMPTY STORES IN SHOPPING CENTERS - FAR OUTWEIGHS ANY BENEFIT THAT COULD EVER BE GENERATED FROM THE WINE IN SUPERMARKET PROPOSAL - IT WILL BE AN ECOMONIC FIASCO.

If wine needs be sold in supermarkets - to flood the market with cheap jug wine - it will put our local LI and NYS wineries out of business. Residents will not shleep to these wineries - they will just go the the 7/11 and buy cheap Gallo or Almaden junk wine.

So, if we really need cheap junk and jug wine in the supermarkets - enact the law - WITH A 10 YEAR WINDOW - SO STORE OWNERS CAN GET OUT OF THEIR LEASES - AND STOP ISSUING NEW LICENSES DURING THIS 10 YEARS SO OTHER STOP OWNERS DON'T LOSE THEIR LIFE SAVINGS AND HOMES INVESTING IN THESE BUSINESSES.

This half baked idea IS COMPLETELY CONTRARY TO THE ECOMONIC STIMULUS PACKAGE PRESIDENT OBAMA HAS ENACTED HOPING TO JUMP START OUR ECONOMY. THIS WINE IN SUPERMARKET SCHEME TO RAISE MONEY TO COVER THE STATE BUDGET GAP WILL GENERATE MORE ECONOMIC LOSS THAN BENEFIT. EVERY SHOPPING CENTER IN NYS WILL LOSE A TENANT, AND THERE WILL BE ANOTHER EMPTY STORE - TO ADD TO THE ALREADY GROWING NUMBER OF EMPTY STORES.

IN SUMMARY - ITS JUST A HALF BAKED IDEA - AND THIS ARTICLE TOTALLY MISSES THE POINT.

“It might have been !!!”

Since: Aug 07

F&P City

#2 Mar 11, 2009
As long as they keep it fresh in the boxes I don't care where they sell it.
blackberry 8

Sarasota, FL

#3 Mar 13, 2009
Interesting article. Here in Florida our liquor laws are not so archaic. You can buy wine and liquers in the supermarket. You can buy alcohol on Sunday, after noon. We have huge discount liquor stores but still have smaller, mom & pop style businesses. One in our town also sells gift baskets with gourmet crackers and cheese assortments and they do quite well. So far, we can even receive wine shipments from out of state. The real issue in New York seems to be government greed and the strength of whatever lobbyist exerts the most influence in Albany. The outcome of the current push to expand wine sales will result in another power play. As usual, doing what's best for the consumer won't be a consideration.
Thomas

Yonkers, NY

#4 Mar 13, 2009
I don't buy the malarkey that selling wine, or even liquor in grocery stores is a huge game changer. I lived in California for 8 years. I could buy Irish whiskey or good Napa Valley vintages at reasonable prices any day, up until 2AM (when the bars closed). There are no more youth-drunkeness issues there than there are in the NE, and I could still find good boutique specialty stores catering to those with more eclectic tastes in wines or single-malts.

While the first poster may have to change the way he does business, he doesn't necessarily have to go OUT of business.(And yes, I've owned a bar, so I know something about the subject)
Buckwheat Accadavitz

Watseka, IL

#5 Mar 13, 2009
The headline mentions a "FIGHT OVER WINE" I expected to see coverage of that brawl last weekend at the Hicksville train station between the wino's!

Since: Jan 09

New York, NY

#6 Mar 13, 2009
Phyllis Spisto wrote:
If wine is sold in supermarkets - it will be jug and box JUNK WINE. Now we have beautiful boutique wine shops, like mine - that cater to all wine buyers from $5.00 to $500 per bottle.
Wine in the supermarkets will put me out of business. After I am put out of business, and close my store, I will still owe rent on my lease for the remainder of the lease - 10 years - under New York Law. NYS follows the minority rule and does not require a landlord to mitigate damages and find a new tenant. I must put the business and myself personally in bankruptcy, as I personally guaranteed the commercial lease. It means I lose my home also. I also lose my ability to purchased my own health insurance, as well as health insurance for my employees - and pay their salary. We all then need unemployment insurance, medicare, medicaid, or just go to the emergency room.
This article misses the whole point of Gov. Paterson's proposing wine in supermarkets - to generate $150 Million licence fees. The industry has shown that these fees are bogus - and can be better generated by just raising the license fees to exisiting stores. HOWEVER, THE ECONOMIC LOSS TO THE EXISITING STORE OWNERS, THEIR EMPLOYEES, LOSS OF INCOME, LOSS OF RENTS TO LANDLORDS, EMPTY STORES IN SHOPPING CENTERS - FAR OUTWEIGHS ANY BENEFIT THAT COULD EVER BE GENERATED FROM THE WINE IN SUPERMARKET PROPOSAL - IT WILL BE AN ECOMONIC FIASCO.
If wine needs be sold in supermarkets - to flood the market with cheap jug wine - it will put our local LI and NYS wineries out of business. Residents will not shleep to these wineries - they will just go the the 7/11 and buy cheap Gallo or Almaden junk wine.
So, if we really need cheap junk and jug wine in the supermarkets - enact the law - WITH A 10 YEAR WINDOW - SO STORE OWNERS CAN GET OUT OF THEIR LEASES - AND STOP ISSUING NEW LICENSES DURING THIS 10 YEARS SO OTHER STOP OWNERS DON'T LOSE THEIR LIFE SAVINGS AND HOMES INVESTING IN THESE BUSINESSES.
This half baked idea IS COMPLETELY CONTRARY TO THE ECOMONIC STIMULUS PACKAGE PRESIDENT OBAMA HAS ENACTED HOPING TO JUMP START OUR ECONOMY. THIS WINE IN SUPERMARKET SCHEME TO RAISE MONEY TO COVER THE STATE BUDGET GAP WILL GENERATE MORE ECONOMIC LOSS THAN BENEFIT. EVERY SHOPPING CENTER IN NYS WILL LOSE A TENANT, AND THERE WILL BE ANOTHER EMPTY STORE - TO ADD TO THE ALREADY GROWING NUMBER OF EMPTY STORES.
IN SUMMARY - ITS JUST A HALF BAKED IDEA - AND THIS ARTICLE TOTALLY MISSES THE POINT.
This is only my opinion. I believe die-hard wine lovers and collectors will not buy wine from the local grocery stores. They simply won't be able to carry the large selection that a boutique carries. I'm not a wine drinker but, my sister is and she is very selective about the bottle she buys.
It is very important that you as a business owner, continue to keep the public aware of this.
Large grocery chains have put bakeries, card shops and possibly other small mom and pop shops out of business throughout all of New York.

Since: Jan 09

New York, NY

#7 Mar 13, 2009
I should rephrase what I stated about the grocery stores putting the small mom and pop shops out of business. They aren't solely the culprits. High rents, shady leases and LIPA helped to contribute to the problem.

Since: Mar 09

AOL

#8 Mar 13, 2009
i will always buy my wine at a local liquor store
F Meyer

Bethania, NC

#9 Mar 16, 2009
The prohibitionist spirit is still alive and well, viciously applied in the case of "recreational" substances like heroin, coke, meth, and hash, and irritatingly applied to nicotine. Since there are strong economic incentives on both the private and public side of the control systems, this is unlikely to change anytime soon, though the public may tire of locking up so many participants in these markets as the financial system collapse sinks in. Surely that is part of the reason why the Volstead Act was reversed in 1933, so perhaps that will be a silver lining to the current dark clouds
F Meyer

Bethania, NC

#10 Mar 16, 2009
The author of the first comment benefits from an existing set of regulations that restricts competitors, and enables a higher cost operation than would otherwise be the case, run at a higher price to customers. He or she expects the rest of us to empathize with the problems that the loss of that competetive advantage will create for the operation. As entrepreneurs and risk takers, we may have some sympathy, and even wish we could have gotten such a good deal from the state in the past and be able to maintain it forever through such specious arguments as this. As consumers, we can only say, "So sad, too bad, adjust to the change or move on."

What the political process gives, the political process can take away. A good lesson for all citizens to learn.
F Meyer

Bethania, NC

#11 Mar 16, 2009
I have to agree with the store owner's assessment of this tax raising scheme: definitely a half-baked idea that totally contradicts the alleged goal of "jump starting" the stalled economy. In fact, raising taxes and promoting even more government spending than the revenues raised by taxation in the name of promoting economic growth is like administering more poison to cure a poisoned patient.

But private (corporate management) and public (governors, legislators, judges, and unelected bureaucrats) politicians have never been known (as a class) for acting consistently with their rhetoric, so why anyone should expect something different now is beyond the understanding of any rational, prudent observer.
Wine Drinker

Fairfield, CT

#13 Mar 16, 2009
You know, I hear this argument time and time again! It's such a ...oh, wait, I just shit myself...be right back :(
liner

Hicksville, NY

#14 Mar 16, 2009
spytee wrote:
i will always buy my wine at a local liquor store
Unless Pathmark puts them out of business.

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