Teachers: Text message shortcuts trip...

Teachers: Text message shortcuts trip up students

There are 136 comments on the Newsday story from Jun 16, 2008, titled Teachers: Text message shortcuts trip up students. In it, Newsday reports that:

Every so often while Jeff Littwin is grading papers he'll come across three letters.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Newsday.

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when will they learn

Kingsport, TN

#2 Jun 16, 2008
give them an F if they cant write words fail them...whats the problem? do you job as teacher and fail them.
Okay

Bronx, NY

#3 Jun 16, 2008
idk my bff jill?
jjj

United States

#4 Jun 16, 2008
lazy bastards, their parents should give them a whipping...LOL! LMAO!
knightreader

Brooklyn, NY

#6 Jun 16, 2008
14 years old with a blackberry... sending 3,700 texts in 31 days...that's about 120 a day... anyone else see anything wrong with this???
rsbolger

Trenton, NJ

#7 Jun 16, 2008
Interesting how a teacher, in a statement about poor grammar and spelling, states "there's no commas...". This statement itself is grammatically incorrect as commas is plural and thus there ARE no commas. Wondering about the source of the problem?
Crazy World We Live In

Brooklyn, NY

#8 Jun 16, 2008
knightreader wrote:
14 years old with a blackberry... sending 3,700 texts in 31 days...that's about 120 a day... anyone else see anything wrong with this???
"... anyone else see anything wrong with this???"

Nope. It is perfectly normal. The owners of this country prefer uneducated sheep. That way, they (the owners) can continue to bend them (the uneducated sheep) over and rip them off without them even noticing.
well actually

Yonkers, NY

#9 Jun 16, 2008
puh-leeze tell me the person writing this article included "there's no commas" as a tacit commentary on the sad state of grammar, even among those who teach it! or did it escape her too?(and yes, i use all lower case, so don't call me a curmudgeon.)
Howard Stern

AOL

#10 Jun 16, 2008
The last person to write an essay at Roosevelt High School was Howard Stern.
This may, however, be the first teacher there that actually read them.
Post literate generation

AOL

#11 Jun 16, 2008
The game is over.

The teaching of English spelling and punctuation -- along with the basics of mathematics like the multiplication tables -- and the basics of history and geography and so, so much more, has virtually ceased in American public education.

The better students teach themselves through reading and their own hobbies and by consorting with other good students. The top 10% will survive even in a world where most of the better-paying jobs are being outsourced.

All the rest never rise to a literate level in terms of reading and writing (and spelling)-- to say nothing of their non-existent skills in mathematics, history, geography and all of the other basics.

The decline started just before 1970, and the levels of literacy have been plummeting at an increasing rate ever since. We're well into the second generation of post-literacy.

That is why the sales clerk cannot make change (especially if you give him or her the loose pennies when you buy something for $4.29, for example).

That is why American college students cannot spell its, it's, their, there, they're, lose and loose, and separate. That is why they cannot figure out how many square feet of rug to buy for a room that is 8.5 feet by 11 feet. That is why they cannot find China on a world map. That is why they do not know if the Civil War occurred in the seventeenth or the nineteenth century. That is why they don't know what a chemical element is, or a nine-digit zip code, or the weight of a kilogram of bananas or the location of the Himalayas or what capillary action is. They know nothing of Dante, Cervantes or Moliere, nor even of Shakespeare, Steinbeck and Hemingway.

Meanwhile European students all know these basics -- as, increasingly, so do Chinese and other third-world students.

American students revel in their ignorance, and then whine when they can't find anything but a low-paid go-nowhere job. It's party-party-party for far too many of our "students."

The teachers have largely given up -- indeed many of the teachers themselves are in the older group of post-literates, in that they can't spell or write a complete sentence either.

American education is in shambles -- and nobody is interested in getting to the root causes. Everybody just wants to know why their taxes are shooting through the roof.

It matters little now; it is certainly too late to make all of the necessary changes. English-speaking jobs are being outsourced to Indians and Philippinos, to Malaysians and Singaporeans, who can, in fact, spell correctly in English, and write English sentences and paragraphs, and know the product of eight times nine.

Texting is hardly the problem; texting is near the end result. All of the electronic gadegtry has no place in the classroom. Instead of clutching onto a cell phone or a Blackberry in the classroom, the students should be clutching ideas and concepts.

But, alas, it is too late.
I rest my case

AOL

#12 Jun 16, 2008
when will they learn wrote:
give them an F if they cant write words fail them...whats the problem? do you job as teacher and fail them.
perfect example; thank you.
Steve from Yellowstone

Port Jervis, NY

#13 Jun 16, 2008
Man that kid is probably in his 3rd year of 5th grade

FRUUUUUUUNNNNNNNNNKKKKKKISSSSS SSSSS
Truth Teller

Glen Cove, NY

#14 Jun 16, 2008
THEY ALL SUCK wrote:
"Everything is shorthand," Jeff Littwin, lead English teacher at Roosevelt High School. "No capitalization. The spelling is just awful.
At least it's not Ebonics.
from one who knows

Jersey City, NJ

#15 Jun 16, 2008
rsbolger wrote:
Interesting how a teacher, in a statement about poor grammar and spelling, states "there's no commas...". This statement itself is grammatically incorrect as commas is plural and thus there ARE no commas. Wondering about the source of the problem?
It's likely Newsday's shoddy editing.
Blue Devil

Malden, MA

#16 Jun 16, 2008
This happened even sooner than I expected. Welcome to the future. Kids with no education.
from one who knows

Jersey City, NJ

#17 Jun 16, 2008
I just think the work ethic here is very poor. I use profanity daily, but I do not allow it to creep into my English essays.
Wow just wow

East Moriches, NY

#18 Jun 16, 2008
Future writers for Newsday.
stillvisions

White Plains, NY

#19 Jun 16, 2008
urfknkidn
formerly of LI

Voorhees, NJ

#20 Jun 16, 2008
I believe writing in school should be formal writing only. I think diagramming sentences should also be done to understand grammar. Today's writings are atrocious. I had a teacher who had "black list errors". If you used a word on the list -- automatically 26 pts off the paper. Two errors and you fail. Some examples are confusing the use of THERE, THEIR, & THEY'RE; TWO, TO, TOO; WHOSE, WHO'S, etc. It seems harsh now, but I learned how to write.
Getting into the habit of informal writing or text format will be a great hindrance when students are trying to get into large companies and there are other people who can write proper English and the texter loses the job he/she is otherwise qualified for.
Bring Back the Old Days

Mcdonough, GA

#21 Jun 16, 2008
Post literate generation wrote:
The game is over.
The teaching of English spelling and punctuation -- along with the basics of mathematics like the multiplication tables -- and the basics of history and geography and so, so much more, has virtually ceased in American public education.
The better students teach themselves through reading and their own hobbies and by consorting with other good students. The top 10% will survive even in a world where most of the better-paying jobs are being outsourced.
All the rest never rise to a literate level in terms of reading and writing (and spelling)-- to say nothing of their non-existent skills in mathematics, history, geography and all of the other basics.
The decline started just before 1970, and the levels of literacy have been plummeting at an increasing rate ever since. We're well into the second generation of post-literacy.
That is why the sales clerk cannot make change (especially if you give him or her the loose pennies when you buy something for $4.29, for example).
That is why American college students cannot spell its, it's, their, there, they're, lose and loose, and separate. That is why they cannot figure out how many square feet of rug to buy for a room that is 8.5 feet by 11 feet. That is why they cannot find China on a world map. That is why they do not know if the Civil War occurred in the seventeenth or the nineteenth century. That is why they don't know what a chemical element is, or a nine-digit zip code, or the weight of a kilogram of bananas or the location of the Himalayas or what capillary action is. They know nothing of Dante, Cervantes or Moliere, nor even of Shakespeare, Steinbeck and Hemingway.
Meanwhile European students all know these basics -- as, increasingly, so do Chinese and other third-world students.
American students revel in their ignorance, and then whine when they can't find anything but a low-paid go-nowhere job. It's party-party-party for far too many of our "students."
The teachers have largely given up -- indeed many of the teachers themselves are in the older group of post-literates, in that they can't spell or write a complete sentence either.
American education is in shambles -- and nobody is interested in getting to the root causes. Everybody just wants to know why their taxes are shooting through the roof.
It matters little now; it is certainly too late to make all of the necessary changes. English-speaking jobs are being outsourced to Indians and Philippinos, to Malaysians and Singaporeans, who can, in fact, spell correctly in English, and write English sentences and paragraphs, and know the product of eight times nine.
Texting is hardly the problem; texting is near the end result. All of the electronic gadegtry has no place in the classroom. Instead of clutching onto a cell phone or a Blackberry in the classroom, the students should be clutching ideas and concepts.
But, alas, it is too late.
This is absolutely true, a perfect synopsis of America's failure at education. Today's teachers (under the age of 40) are the products of the initial dumbing down in education syndrome. Is it no wonder then why today's students are far behind those in Europe and Asia?
LOLz

AOL

#22 Jun 16, 2008
LOLspeak ur doin it rong!

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