Chemo hair loss messy, awkward; advance preparations can make i...

Their work involves lots of entertaining and myriad social commitments for which chic black is pretty much the diplomatic dress code.But black wasn't an option when the chemotherapy drugs battling Smith's ... Full Story
jeanie

Springfield, OH

#43 Jan 15, 2008
Hello,
I just finished my second bout with breast cancer on Dec. 14th. I was supposed to have 12 rounds but after eight I had a petscan and all was clear, PTL!
I was on taxol and herceptin. Still taking herceptin as a preventitive for a year.
I still have some side effects like numbness in fingers, toes and the balls of my feet. My feet are the worst, like walking on rocks but it is worse if I don't have shoes on!
My oncoligist said my hair would begin to fall out in the first 4 to 6 weeks but since I lost it the first time I was more sensitive to it and it fell out in two weeks. I ended up buzzing it because it was everywhere. The second time was no less shock than the first. I went through about a week of mourning again. If the toxic meds gets rid of the cancer and it doesn't come back again it is worth it. Funny thing is my hair is about 3/4 in. long now but my lashes and brows are falling out. I can't figure that one out. Anyone know why?
Mike

Taylorsville, KY

#44 Jan 15, 2008
jeanie wrote:
Hello,
I just finished my second bout with breast cancer on Dec. 14th. I was supposed to have 12 rounds but after eight I had a petscan and all was clear, PTL!
I was on taxol and herceptin. Still taking herceptin as a preventitive for a year.
I still have some side effects like numbness in fingers, toes and the balls of my feet. My feet are the worst, like walking on rocks but it is worse if I don't have shoes on! My oncoligist said my hair would begin to fall out in the first 4 to 6 weeks but since I lost it the first time I was more sensitive to it and it fell out in two weeks. I ended up buzzing it because it was everywhere. The second time was no less shock than the first. I went through about a week of mourning again. If the toxic meds gets rid of the cancer and it doesn't come back again it is worth it. Funny thing is my hair is about 3/4 in. long now but my lashes and brows are falling out. I can't figure that one out. Anyone know why?
Hi Jeanie,
This is a story you need to read. Xanthones have been proven through science to kill cancer cells and have been shown to outperform 4 of the 5 leading cancer drugs used today.

CHRIS: BEATING STAGE 4 BRAIN CANCER

After suffering from headaches for months, I had a seizure in late September of 2006.
When I awoke, I learned that I had been out for 1 1/2 days! In that time I was air flown to
UCSF for emergency surgery to remove 2 tumors, a golf ball sized and another smaller one, from the left side of my brain. Unfortunately, a 3rdnd tumor could not be removed,as that would have left me unable to talk and possibly paralyze my entire left side.

This tumor was of a kind known as a Glioblastoma multiforme tumor. I researched it on line. Here is an excerpt from a Wikipedia definition:
Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), also known as grade 4 astrocytoma, is the most commonand aggressive type of primary brain tumor, accounting for 52% of all primary brain tumor casesand 20% of all intracranial tumors. Despite being the most prevalent form of primary brain tumor,GBM's occur at only 2-3 cases per 100,000 people in Europe and North America.

Treatment can involve chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery; all of which are acknowledgedas palliative measures, meaning that they do not provide a cure. The five year survival rate of thedisease has remained unchanged over the past 30 years, and stands at less than three percent.Even with complete surgical resection of the tumor, combined with the best available treatment,the survival rate for GBM remains very low.
I was told that I had 6 months to live. Within 6 weeks, I was on chemo and radiation
therapies with no effect. In fact, my first MRI results from this showed that the tumor had
actually DOUBLED in size!

Find out what a true miracle is. Request it and I'll send you the whole story including Chris's picture. What are Xanthones and how did they save his life? The most powerful botanical on earth and most people never heard of it! email me backroom@insightbb.com or find out more at www.InformationOnMangosteen.info

Since: Jun 07

Philippines

#45 Jan 19, 2008
Never agree to chemotherapy.
A healthy person will become sick if given chemotherapy.
Logic 101.
jeanie

Springfield, OH

#46 Jan 22, 2008
Hello Goodsamaritan,
But I was not healthy, otherwise I would not have cancer. Yes, I got sick with chemo but for now I am in remission. How could I not agree to chemo? I have 3 daughters and sons-in-law and 6 grandchildren to love. I don't know what I would do if one of them were sick and refused treatment.
I'm just very grateful it was me with the breast cancer and not my daughters.
Thank you for the comment.
Theresa

AOL

#47 Mar 8, 2008
I hope you are doing well. I need to shave my hair off but I have'nt been able to do it yet. I'm sick of the way I look and I hate cleaning up hair. I might just do it tomorrow. Thanks for the advice. Theresa
liana wrote:
<quoted text>
I just shaved my hair. I look awufull!But anyway. it is better like this. And I don t care anymore about my hare. I only want to feel better. Doctors don t give me too many chances. But I still have faith in life! God bless you all! If u are sick and u need to talk to someone who knows what u are going through, u can find me on messenger- id lianaman2006
Theresa

AOL

#48 Mar 8, 2008
Dear Liana,

I hope that you are okay by now. I have my hair falling out all over everything. I have'nt been able to shave it off but I just may do it tomorrow. Thanks for the idea.

Theresa
Survivor

Pleasanton, CA

#49 Mar 11, 2008
I am very glad to have found this forum. This is a very detrimental part of chemo. I shaved mine as soon as it started falling out as my hair was very long and yes, it could have gotten very messy. Very hard to accept having lived with long thick hair all of my life, I didn't realize how much warmth my hair provided until it was gone.

I was misdiagnosed for 4 years, became dependent on pain pills as I was in severe pain and that was the only treatment provided until the cancer was found (no pain pills since 10/5/07!!!!).

I ran into someone I dated several years ago and I'm sure he was very shocked at my appearance. Our relationship ended very ugly as I found out he was married (has since been divorced and is now remarried). Let me share with all of you how cruel this person is by the first paragraph of an email that he sent to me via myspace:

from Baileyclan8:

Change your picture to depict the person you now truly are.. A shaved-head looking, self distructive, admitted on National TV, drug dependent suicidal person!

Apparently, I'm suppose to replace my picture on my myspace with a current one with no hair (my hair is actually 2-3 inches long now).

Luckily, I was able to just brush this off and not let it affect me, I've overcome so much in the last year, this is the least of my concerns.

If you feel like venting and telling this man how cruel he is, you have my blessing.
The very best of wishes to everyone out there!
gagirlm

Waycross, GA

#50 Apr 10, 2008
hi, my mom just starting losing her long hair, she cut it off short and wants to make a wig out of her hair. Does anyone know a company/person that makes this type wig? We live in South Georgia. any help would be greatly appreicated.

“Just Me!!”

Since: Oct 07

Moberly shhhhhhh

#51 May 2, 2008
I know losing one's hair is a scaring trama on the inside of our souls. I lost mine 24 years ago. When I see someone I know who is battling cancer with hair lost it brings it all back to me again! I could not and will offend anybody who has had hair lost battling anything. Like cancer! When I see women, men, children, with scarfs covering their heads, I would like to tell them to be strong. But being a cancer patient I know this is wrong! When some of my hair came back(I was blonde) it came back black, white, red, curley. I'm just very happy to be alive. When I recovered from cancer I turned into a different person. Too bad I wasn't this person before I had cancer! Be proud you are alive, I'm the only one in my family to beat the big C. Dont know why either. To those battling this big C take one day at a time. Live your life not someone elses! Make your own choices in life! Did you see the sunrise this morning, or the sunset?
sorry

Kansas City, MO

#52 Aug 26, 2008
do you feel all right

“Just Me!!”

Since: Oct 07

Moberly shhhhhhh

#53 Aug 26, 2008
Im fine
Gail Perry

Pinellas Park, FL

#54 Aug 26, 2008
1) Healthy people do not get chemotherapy. People at risk of dying without it get chemotherapy.

2) As soon as I found out I was going to have chemo, I went to a really big wig shop. Good thing -- most of them looked awful on me. I bought two of the one that looked good, which is good because I accidentally ruined one of them.

I did have my head shaved and I wasn't even upset about it because I felt it was necessary to make sure I didn't die, but just keep breast cancer a "bump in the road." But, my scalp never prickled or got painful. As soon as it got even a little thin I just went and have it shaved.

But the other thing I did was wear the wig even before I started chemo, on occasion. I didn't really want everyone whispering "Oh look, poor Gail -- her hair fell out." By wearing the wig when I chose to start wearing it, it made the chemo less of an issue for people who weren't close friends and who didn't know the intimate details of my day-to-day life. It let me be in control, and I liked that.

I tried going out just for a walk one day in a hat, and ... people stared at me. I went right back to the wig.

“Just Me!!”

Since: Oct 07

Moberly shhhhhhh

#55 Aug 27, 2008
Gail Perry wrote:
1) Healthy people do not get chemotherapy. People at risk of dying without it get chemotherapy.
2) As soon as I found out I was going to have chemo, I went to a really big wig shop. Good thing -- most of them looked awful on me. I bought two of the one that looked good, which is good because I accidentally ruined one of them.
I did have my head shaved and I wasn't even upset about it because I felt it was necessary to make sure I didn't die, but just keep breast cancer a "bump in the road." But, my scalp never prickled or got painful. As soon as it got even a little thin I just went and have it shaved.
But the other thing I did was wear the wig even before I started chemo, on occasion. I didn't really want everyone whispering "Oh look, poor Gail -- her hair fell out." By wearing the wig when I chose to start wearing it, it made the chemo less of an issue for people who weren't close friends and who didn't know the intimate details of my day-to-day life. It let me be in control, and I liked that.
I tried going out just for a walk one day in a hat, and ... people stared at me. I went right back to the wig.
You know people here also carry your burden. We support you totally!!!
Gail Perry

Pinellas Park, FL

#56 Aug 27, 2008
That's very kind of you, Missouri Man, but I finished chemo 15 months ago.:)

I think you missed my point. By buying, and wearing a wig ahead of time, I chose who helped carry my burden, and I made my chemotherapy less of a public issue.

The problem when *everyone* wants to lift you up is that you naver get to just put it out of your mind.

But I seem to be of a different mind than many people who have had breast cancer. I hate being called brave; I had no rational choice except the treatments I had. I really hate being called a survivor -- a nurse in the hospital actually called me a "survivor" as I was coming up from the anesthesia. No one knew at that point how likely it was that it had spread, and I didn't know at all whether I was a "survivor" or not, but I hate the term, because I think of it as a bump in the road (pardon the pun!)

The mastectomy was easy. I was home within 24 hours by my own choice. Chemo was a piece of cake except when they didn't pay attention to anemia -- being anemic sucks. Not once but twice I required the nurses to actually calculate the figures. The first time my hemo had gone from 16 to 9, a HUGE change. The second time they had to do the math but I was headed toward anemia again. That time (because I was assertive) they headed it off.

Herceptin was no big deal.

Femara? I HATE Femara but ... I have no choice.

I dislike the political correctness that surrounds breast cancer issues. I say, pick a wig that looks great on you, shave your head, and go on with life. The hair does grow back, and with any luck the cancer does not. Win win.

“Just Me!!”

Since: Oct 07

Moberly shhhhhhh

#57 Aug 27, 2008
I always said, to each his own!! People stare, because are stupid. You have been, and there done that. So have I. And you understand what I mean. I'll bet! The frist time I shocked someone, they were very supportive of me.. These 2 black women I know told my wife, Ill bet you never seen 2 black women hug your husband!@! We are best of friends even today! Political Correctness SUCKS!
Gail Perry

Pinellas Park, FL

#58 Aug 27, 2008
I also had a very insensitive person, who had been a good friend, burst out laughing when she walked into my condo without knocking and saw me without my wig on.

That is just an example of difficulties with the relationship and I no longer see her, but it bothered me more that the strangers just couldn't take their eyes off my head. For me, as I say, I think it was about my choosing who and how to share it and not have it constantly be an issue. of course if I were 40 and looked like Demi Moore that might have been different -- LOL!-- but bald was not beautiful on me!
Ummmmmm

Sacramento, CA

#59 Dec 12, 2008
My daughter was dignosed a year ago. She just buzzed hers. I was diagnosed 5 years before her. I just combed mine all out. My daughter found the most cutest wig. When she wore it, you couldn't even tell it was a wig. It looked better than her natural hair...but she hated that wig. My wig, on the other hand, looked like a wig. They have some really nice ones out there. It takes a lot of searching, though, to find the very best fit for you. Many blessings.

----------
www.habierose.com
An interest for cancer patients seeking natural and non-scented items.
Gail Perry

Pinellas Park, FL

#60 Dec 13, 2008
I'm not going to tell anyone else what to do. I know people who wore wigs and people who did not. I wore a wig and I wish my real hair looked that good!
Ummmmmm

Sacramento, CA

#61 Dec 13, 2008
Gail Perry wrote:
1) Healthy people do not get chemotherapy. People at risk of dying without it get chemotherapy.
2) As soon as I found out I was going to have chemo, I went to a really big wig shop. Good thing -- most of them looked awful on me. I bought two of the one that looked good, which is good because I accidentally ruined one of them.
I did have my head shaved and I wasn't even upset about it because I felt it was necessary to make sure I didn't die, but just keep breast cancer a "bump in the road." But, my scalp never prickled or got painful. As soon as it got even a little thin I just went and have it shaved.
But the other thing I did was wear the wig even before I started chemo, on occasion. I didn't really want everyone whispering "Oh look, poor Gail -- her hair fell out." By wearing the wig when I chose to start wearing it, it made the chemo less of an issue for people who weren't close friends and who didn't know the intimate details of my day-to-day life. It let me be in control, and I liked that.
I tried going out just for a walk one day in a hat, and ... people stared at me. I went right back to the wig.
You and I are very much alike in our thinking about this. It WAS a bump in the road. Something to get through and get over. The thing that would hurt me the most is, in fact, the people staring. I wore my wig, but you could tell it was a wig. Even a little girl in the grocery store stared at me, for some reason. All I could think about was that she was wondering what this funny thing was on my head. Then, I felt bad because of the pity looks. Though everyone at work was so supportive and wonderful...I could see pity in their faces and that hurt me. For the longest, I felt like "The sick person", even after treatment and recon surgery. It took a while for everyone to look at me any differently. I remember lifting something at work and someone asked me, "Can you do that?" That was before mastectomy. Another time, we were having a pot luck and I filled my plate and ate everything and somebody said, "It's good you have an appetite and can eat." Seems like everyone was expecting me to look emaciated and expecting me to die. Gail you have a great attitude.

----------
www.habierose.com
jeanie

United States

#62 Jan 13, 2009
Hi,
It has been a year since I posted my comment and here I am back on my third bout with it.
What can I say, it just keeps rearing its UGLY head!

I hope everyone here is doing well!

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