sugary drinks and obesity

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#42 Apr 4, 2014
Each additional sugary drink consumed per day increases the likelihood of a child becoming obese by about 60%. Sugary drinks are connected to other health problems
as well.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#43 Apr 7, 2014
A University of British Columbia study says students who consume sugar-sweetened beverages are more likely to be obese – though its lead author says the situation has improved in this province in recent years due to a crackdown on junk-food availability at schools.

The study, published Wednesday in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, looked at more than 11,000 B.C. students from Grades 7 to 12. The data, taken from more than 170 schools, were collected in 2007-08. The study found the availability of sugar-sweetened beverages impacted students’ odds of being obese – it said the availability of unhealthy foods in general was linked to higher consumption of those foods.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#44 Apr 8, 2014
Sugary drinks (soda, energy, sports drinks) are the top calorie source in teens’ diets (226 calories per day), beating out pizza (213 calories per day).
From 1989 to 2008, calories consumed in the form of sugary beverages increased by 60% in children ages 6 to 11, and the percentage of children consuming them rose from 79% to 91%.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#45 Apr 10, 2014
Sugary drinks, or sugar sweetened beverages, include all non-alcoholic water based beverages with added sugar such as non-diet soft drinks, energy drinks, fruit drinks, sports drinks and cordial.
Sugar sweetened beverages are high in kilojoules, leading to weight gain and obesity.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#46 Apr 11, 2014
People who consume sugary drinks regularly—1 to 2 cans a day or more—have a 26% greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who rarely have such drinks. (22) Risks are even greater in young adults and Asians.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#47 Apr 14, 2014
A 20-ounce soda can contain 65 grams of sugar? That’s approximately 22 packets of sugar in just one bottle. All that added sugar can have serious health consequences. The extra calories in sugar-loaded drinks can lead to obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#48 Apr 15, 2014
A University of British Columbia study says students who consume sugar-sweetened beverages are more likely to be obese – though its lead author says the situation has improved in this province in recent years due to a crackdown on junk-food availability at schools.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#49 Apr 16, 2014
Just about every week, it seems, a new study warns of another potential health risk linked to soft drinks.

The most recent headlines have raised concerns that diet sodas boost stroke risk. Diet and regular sodas have both been linked to obesity, kidney damage, and certain cancers. Regular soft drinks have been linked to elevated blood pressure.

Several hundred soda studies have been published over the last two decades, but most of the ones done in humans (as opposed to mice or rats) relied on people’s memories of what they drank.

Observational studies like these can point to possible concerns, but they can't prove that sodas do, or don’t, pose a health risk.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#50 Apr 21, 2014
People who are overweight are heavier than what is healthy for their height. Being overweight places a person at a greater risk for many health problems, including heart disease, diabetes and stroke.


The main way to determine a healthy weight is through a Body Mass Index (BMI) score..

For most people, the BMI score reflects how much body fat they have.

A normal BMI for adults is 20-24.
A BMI of 25-29 for adults is considered overweight.
Overweight for children is based on their gender, their age, and their BMI. A child with a BMI that is higher than 85% of other children of the same age and gender is considered overweight.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#51 Apr 22, 2014
Did you know that one of the professions with the most obese workers are drivers?

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#52 Apr 23, 2014
New research powerfully strengthens the case against soda and other sugary drinks as culprits in the obesity epidemic.

A huge, decades-long study involving more than 33,000 Americans has yielded the first clear proof that drinking sugary beverages interacts with genes that affect weight, amplifying a person's risk of obesity beyond what it would be from heredity alone.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#53 Apr 24, 2014
The average person consumes almost 100 pounds of sugar a year, with the single biggest source being sodas.
The American Heart Association recommends that the maximum daily intake of added sugars be no more than 4.5 teaspoons for teens aged 12-19.
Did you know, health costs of obesity in the United States are $147 billion annually? That’s like buying everyone in the U.S. an iPad 2.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#55 Apr 28, 2014
Washington: A new study has found that sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are contributing in the obesity epidemic, particularly among American children.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#56 Apr 29, 2014
Sodas and other sweetened drinks are full of sugar such as high-fructose corn syrup. Many also contain caffeine, which is a diuretic that can cause dehydration.

Another problem with sweetened beverages is that the body doesn't register it's full after drinking hundreds of calories. This may have to do with ghrelin, the hormone in your stomach that lets you know when you're hungry. When the hormone increases, you feel hungry. When you eat, the hormone goes down. However, it only works with food, not liquid. Drinking soda, juice, sports drinks and other sugar-sweetened liquids does nothing for your hunger, even if you consume hundreds of calories. As a result, sugar-sweetened beverages are often wasted calories.

In other words, the human digestive system is not designed for drinking calories. Soda is a relatively recent addition to the human diet. It was introduced in the second half of the 19th century and there was not an obesity problem until the 20th century. When looking at obesity in the United States alongside fructose and soft drink consumption, they are on a parallel line.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#57 Apr 30, 2014
A new study has found that sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are contributing in the obesity epidemic, particularly among American children. The Obesity Society’s rep Diana Thomas, Professor at Montclair State University and Director of the Center for Quantitative Obesity Research, said that following a thorough review and analysis of the existing research, TOS concludes that, by adding more non-nutritious calories to the American diet, SSBs have contributed to the US obesity epidemic.(Read: Are soft drinks as bad as cigarettes for your health?)

‘Further, we recommend that to maintain and improve health children minimize drinking SSBs and adults reduce or avoid SSB consumption as part of an overall strategy to reduce calories,’ she said. According to the position statement posted online, TOS defines SSBs as sodas, sports drinks and other types of beverages that are primarily made up of water and added sugar. Thomas said that despite the challenges researchers have faced with isolating the impact of specific foods or beverages on body weight, the studies conducted on SSBs thus far have generated important and meaningful data leading to our conclusion.(Read: Soft drinks make it harder to lose weight)

The evidence shows that individuals with a higher BMI consume more SSBs than their leaner counterparts, and that decreasing SSB consumption may reduce overall calorie intake and help individuals with obesity or overweight reach healthy weight goals, she said. Weight gain occurs when total energy intake exceeds energy expenditure for extended periods of time and because SSBs are a non-nutritious source of calories, decreasing and even eliminating them from the diet offers an excellent opportunity to reduce total energy intake. As a healthy alternative to SSBs, TOS reinforces the need for individuals to consume more water, a readily accessible, calorie-free source.(Read: Peer pressure can help kids avoid soft drinks!)

Source: IANS

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#62 May 8, 2014
A new study out today suggests that just one 12 ounce serving of a sugar-sweetened beverage can raise the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 22 percent. Notably, even diet soda drinkers had to worry about developing diabetes.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#63 May 10, 2014
Many social and environmental pressures lead to greater obesity in children. Chief among these influences is the wide variety and availability of sugar-sweetened drinks that contain little to no nutritional value. These beverages include:

Soft drinks
Sports drinks
Fruit drinks
Flavored teas and coffees
Energy drinks

Throughout the past 10-15 years, these drinks have exploded on to the consumer scene, flooding grocery stores, gas stations, convenience stores and vending machines.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#64 May 12, 2014
Overweight and obesity are caused by an imbalance between calories consumed from all foods and beverages (total diet) and calories burned (physical activity). Therefore, it is misleading to suggest that beverage consumption is uniquely responsible for weight gain among this group of children, especially at a time in their lives when they would normally gain weight and grow

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#65 May 13, 2014
Five-year-olds who drink sugar-sweetened sodas, sports drinks or juices every day are more likely to be obese than those who have sugar-sweetened beverages less often, according to a new study.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#66 May 19, 2014
In the past decade, energy drinks have exploded into the marketplace. In 2006 alone, 500 new energy drinks were launched. Energy drinks, which typically contain large amounts of sugar and caffeine, are equally if not more dangerous to children. Although the target market for energy drinks is young adults aged 18-35, teenagers are consuming significant quantities of these beverages.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Nursing Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Nursing Test Banks *.*.* JoJo (Nov '11) 49 min megan pohida 4
News Doctors distressed by 'unethical' dialysis rule... Thu Cordwainer Trout 7
News Health care and business among topics discussed... May 19 they got new hosp so 1
News REVEALED: Temporary nursing staff spending bill May 16 patti rn 1
News Congressman McKinley meets with bankers May 13 hashtagmemeztime 3
News Study: Most common jobs in Cincinnati don't pay... May 9 TOTAC 5
Nursing Unions May 2 Husband of nurse 2