sugary drinks and obesity

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#2
Aug 6, 2013
 
excessive intakes of sugary drinks may lead to diseases such as diabetes, UTI and even cancer

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#3
Oct 8, 2013
 
Before the 1950s, standard soft-drink bottles were 6.5 ounces. In the 1950s, soft-drink makers introduced larger sizes, including the 12-ounce can, which became widely available in 1960. (11) By the early 1990s, 20-ounce plastic bottles became the norm. (12) Today, contour-shaped plastic bottles are available in even larger sizes, such as the 1.25-liter (42-ounce) bottle introduced in 2011.

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#4
Oct 15, 2013
 
Two out of three adults and one out of three children in the United States are overweight or obese, (1,2) and the nation spends an estimated $190 billion a year treating obesity-related health conditions.

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#5
Oct 18, 2013
 
In the 1970s, sugary drinks made up about 4% of US daily calorie intake; by 2001, that had risen to about 9%. (14)

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#6
Oct 23, 2013
 
Over the past century, that authority has been used to prevent death and disease by mandating reporting of cases of tuberculosis, prohibiting the use of paint that contains lead, requiring that municipal water supplies be fluoridated, requiring that window guards be installed in apartments in which small children reside, requiring chain restaurants to post calorie counts on menu boards,

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#7
Oct 31, 2013
 
To clarify, we did not allege that individual board members made fools of themselves. Our point is that any administrative agency, no matter how well intentioned, that issues ineffective symbolic rules to address a major public health problem both undermines public support and emboldens its opponents. The board of health would do well, we think, to spend less time defending ineffective rules and more time demonstrating to the legislature and the public how their proposals actually protect health.

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#8
Nov 6, 2013
 
The overwhelming evidence linking sugary drinks to weight gain prompted the researchers to determine whether a sugar-sweetened drinks tax in the UK could reduce the problem.
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#9
Nov 7, 2013
 
The effect of the tax on obesity would not differ between richer and poorer sectors of society – even though obesity is greater in more deprived communities.

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#10
Feb 24, 2014
 
The Evidence: Soft Drink Consumption Is Rising and Harms Health

Sugary drink portion sizes have risen dramatically over the past 40 years, and children and adults are drinking more soft drinks than ever.

Before the 1950s, standard soft-drink bottles were 6.5 ounces. In the 1950s, soft-drink makers introduced larger sizes, including the 12-ounce can, which became widely available in 1960. By the early 1990s, 20-ounce plastic bottles became the norm. Today, contour-shaped plastic bottles are available in even larger sizes, such as the 1.25-liter (42-ounce) bottle introduced in 2011. In the 1970s, sugary drinks made up about 4% of US daily calorie intake; by 2001, that had risen to about 9%.
Children and youth in the US averaged 224 calories per day from sugary beverages in 1999 to 2004—nearly 11% of their daily calorie intake. From 1989 to 2008, calories from sugary beverages increased by 60% in children ages 6 to 11, from 130 to 209 calories per day, and the percentage of children consuming them rose from 79% to 91%. On any given day, half the people in the U.S. consume sugary drinks; 1 in 4 get at least 200 calories from such drinks; and 5% get at least 567 calories—equivalent to four cans of soda. Sugary drinks (soda, energy, sports drinks) are the top calorie source in teens’ diets (226 calories per day), beating out pizza (213 calories per day).

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#11
Feb 25, 2014
 
Two out of three adults and one out of three children in the United States are overweight or obese, and the nation spends an estimated $190 billion a year treating obesity-related health conditions. Rising consumption of sugary drinks has been a major contributor to the obesity epidemic. A typical 20-ounce soda contains 15 to 18 teaspoons of sugar and upwards of 240 calories. A 64-ounce fountain cola drink could have up to 700 calories. People who drink this “liquid candy” do not feel as full as if they had eaten the same calories from solid food and do not compensate by eating less.

Beverage companies in the US spent roughly $3.2 billion marketing carbonated beverages in 2006, with nearly a half billion dollars of that marketing aimed directly at youth ages 2–17. And each year, youth see hundreds of television ads for sugar-containing drinks. In 2010, for example, preschoolers viewed an average of 213 ads for sugary drinks and energy drinks, while children and teens watched an average of 277 and 406 ads, respectively. Yet the beverage industry aggressively rebuffs suggestions that its products and marketing tactics play any role in the obesity epidemic. Adding to the confusion, beverage industry-funded studies are four to eight times more likely to show a finding favorable to industry than independently-funded studies. This fact sheet assembles key scientific evidence on the link between sugary drink consumption and obesity.

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#12
Feb 26, 2014
 
Sugary drinks are a major contributor to the obesity epidemic.
The term “soft drink” refers to any beverage with added sugar or other sweetener, and includes soda, fruit punch, lemonade and other “ades,” sweetened powdered drinks, and sports and energy drinks.
People who drink sugary beverages do not feel as full as if they had eaten the same calories from solid food, and studies show that people consuming sugary beverages don’t compensate for their high caloric content by eating less food.
Fruit juice is not a better option. Even though it has more nutrients, it contains as much sugar (though from naturally occurring fruit sugars rather than added sugar) and calories as soft drinks.

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#13
Feb 27, 2014
 
Sugary drink companies speak to children early, often, and when parents are not looking. Sugary drinks are the most unhealthy food product marketed to children and are relentlessly and aggressively targeted toward them. Food marketing to children negatively influences the dietary choices and the health of society's most vulnerable citizens. Given the childhood obesity epidemic at hand, we need meaningful solutions and real change. We're here to give you the FACTS.

FACTS - the Food Advertising to Children and Teens Score - was developed by health researchers at Yale University. Explore the Sugary Drink FACTS website to learn more about sugary drink companies, products, nutrition, marketing techniques, and the science behind the FACTS.

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#14
Feb 28, 2014
 
and there as a treat, just like ice cream and candy. They can hardly be considered a daily staple, although that is exactly what they have become thanks to the efforts of the beverage industry.

But you can easily fight back. Just skip the beverage aisle at the supermarket on your next grocery trip. And the one after that. And the one after. In one year, you’ll have saved $500 for a family of four, AND most likely lost a few pounds too.

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#15
Mar 3, 2014
 
Sugary sodas and fruit drinks may be a major factor behind the current obesity epidemic in America, according to a new study.

Researchers reviewed more than 40 years of studies and found the recent increase in consumption of sugary soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened drinks, like fruit drinks, lemonade, and iced tea, is associated with weight gain and obesity.

"Although it has long been suspected that soft drinks contribute at least in part to the obesity epidemic, only in recent years have large epidemiologic studies begun to investigate the relation between soft-drink consumption and long-term weight gain," writes Vasanti S. Malik, of the Harvard School of Public Health, and colleagues in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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#16
Mar 4, 2014
 
Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are drinks sweetened with sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, or other caloric sweeteners. They are a significant source of nutrition-less or "empty" calories in the American diet and a significant contributor to the current obesity epidemic. Concerned policy makers and public health professionals across the country are considering a variety of policies to reduce consumption, including legislation to levy excise taxes on SSBs. Research indicates that if the taxes are large enough they could reduce consumption. In addition, the public health community is calling for the revenue from these taxes to be used on obesity prevention, anti-hunger, and other health initiatives.

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#17
Mar 5, 2014
 
Companies are targeting black and Hispanic children and teens.

Beverage companies have indicated that they view Hispanics and blacks, and teens as a source of future growth for sugary drink product sales.
Black children and teens saw 80 percent to 90 percent more ads compared with white youth, including more than twice as many ads for Sprite, Mountain Dew, 5-hour Energy, and Vitamin Water.
Marketing on Spanish-language TV is growing. From 2008 to 2010, Hispanic children saw 49 percent more ads for sugary drinks and energy drinks, and teens saw 99 percent more ads.
Hispanic preschoolers saw more ads for Coca-Cola Classic, Kool-Aid, 7 Up and Sunny D than older Hispanic children or Hispanic teens did.

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#18
Mar 7, 2014
 
Many drinks contain acid that harms your teeth, including regular and diet soft drinks, sports/energy dirnks and fruit juices. Acid weakens tooth enamel which can lead to tooth decay. Tooth decay is the most prevalent disease in Australia.

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#19
Mar 7, 2014
 
The average can of sugar-sweetened soda or fruit punch provides about 150 calories, almost all of them from sugar, usually high-fructose corn syrup. That’s the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of table sugar. If you were to drink just one can of a sugar-sweetened soft drink every day, and not cut back on calories elsewhere, you could gain up to 5 pounds in a year.
Drinking water in place of SSBs or fruit juices is associated with lower long-term weight gain.
A recent study found that consumption of calorie-sweetened beverages has continued to increase and may play a role in the obesity epidemic, metabolic syndrome and fatty liver disease, whereas reducing intake of soft drinks is associated with less weight gain and metabolic improvement.

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#20
Mar 10, 2014
 
New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas A. Farley and his colleagues from the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene participated in a webinar hosted by CSPI. In September 2012, the New York City Board of Health successfully passed a proposal to set a maximum size for sugary drinks of no more than 16 ounces. This webinar described the rationale for the policy; decisions that influenced the policy; challenges and implications faced by the department; and advice for how to reduce sugary drink consumption in communities. Listen to the thirty-minute webinar to learn how to reshape sugary drink portion size norms in your community.

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#21
Mar 11, 2014
 
The cost in medical and health expenses to the state is estimated at $41 billion.
Gives some perspective on what the CEO of Coca Cola wrote in the Wall Street Journal about Coke not causing Obesity, doesn’t it?

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