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21 - 40 of 49 Comments Last updated May 31, 2014

Since: Apr 13

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#21
Oct 23, 2013
 
new nurses must change their mind-set and their job finding strategies in order
to move forward in their careers. While many of us come out of nursing school having been
groomed primarily for traditional hospital positions.

Since: Apr 13

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#22
Oct 24, 2013
 
You are so awesome! I can tell you are going to be such a great nurse!! Can't wait to put this advice to good use :)

Since: Apr 13

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#23
Oct 31, 2013
 
I know that I personally didn’t feel like a nurse until a year after I became one. Everything seemed foreign and time management was so difficult. I wish I had a good nurse mentor to guide me along my way. I had a few nurses who were helpful and they really made a bid difference in my early days as a nurse.

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#24
Nov 1, 2013
 
You've worked hard to get where you are—that piece of paper represents years of dedication, blood, sweat, and tears. Now that you've left the security of nursing school, it's time to venture into the real world and find your first position in nursing.

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#25
Nov 4, 2013
 
Sixth, share your joys and tribulations with those that may one day choose nursing as a career, or give your support to someone who is struggling with nursing school, or one of your peers. There certainly is more an experienced nurse can share with a new nurse. But whatever we share, it should be positive and motivating. We no longer want to “eat our young.

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#26
Jan 20, 2014
 
Always have an extra pair of scrubs in your locker. :)

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#27
Jan 24, 2014
 
In the appropriate context, humor can be the balm that soothes a patient's pain, in mind and maybe even body. I recall a time when a patient asked for meds for a headache, but he couldn't take acetaminophen due to liver issues, and ibuprofen upset his stomach. He was NPO and IV painkillers would be overkill. I said, "How about if I just put a cool washcloth on your forehead, hold your hand, and sing you a song?" He laughed—always a good sign.

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#28
Jan 27, 2014
 
Ask questions the right way. Asking questions is absolutely necessary when you’re a new nurse. No matter how busy your fellow RNs are, asking is always better than guessing. The trick is to ask a question in the right way, so you get the answer you need. Be specific. Instead of asking how to do something in general, try naming the patient, explaining the situation or problem you’re having, and asking for guidance. Saying,“How would you approach this?” is a good way to enlist the help of a more knowledgeable peer.

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#29
Jan 28, 2014
 
Avoid complaining. Just as with asking questions, there are effective and ineffective ways of presenting problems to your supervisors. Complaining doesn’t garner much cooperation – or sympathy. Chances are, your supervisor has the same complaints as you do! Instead, be straightforward. Assess the situation, explain where the supervisor might be of assistance, and ask for his or her help in resolving the issue. Using phrases like,“Here are some resources that I need,” or “Can we set up a time to brainstorm some solutions?” can signal that you are a problem-solver, not a complainer.

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#30
Jan 29, 2014
 
Learn to delegate. From the start, work at developing positive relationships with nursing assistants and techs. Value them and make them part of your team, so you can delegate tasks instead of trying to do all the work yourself. By helping them, asking for their advice and showing respect for their contributions, you’ll find it easier to delegate tasks to aides or techs when you need assistance.

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#31
Jan 30, 2014
 
Acknowledge that you’ll continue learning throughout your nursing career. You may have finished nursing school, but your learning curve will continue – and that’s okay. In fact, if you’re not learning something new nearly every day, you won’t be doing yourself or your patients any favors. Remember that being a nurse means constantly learning and facing challenges you’ve never experienced before.

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#32
Feb 3, 2014
 
Remember why you’re there. It’s sometimes easy to forget why you became a nurse when you’re working hard to master all of your new duties. So take a breath, smile and focus on your patients. All of your education, skills and knowledge are for their benefit. So remember to speak to – not at – them, and interact with them when you are giving care.

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#33
Feb 4, 2014
 
Find a mentor.
Many organizations assign mentors to new nurses, but if that isn’t the case at your job, it’s critical to ask an experienced nurse to mentor you, Omotosho says.

“Take the time to get to know the staff,” he encourages,“to be sure you choose someone who demonstrates the type of expert knowledge that you need, and who is well respected and savvy about the organization.”

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#34
Feb 5, 2014
 
According to a report reviewing the relationship between skin hygiene and infection, bacterial counts are at least as high or higher after bathing or showering with a regular soap than before.1 Imagine what happens when washing a patient with just one basin of water! Does this mean you should skip bed baths? No. But you should change the bath water and your gloves often. You can also prevent bacterial gestation by storing dry basins upside down and making sure there are no collections of water lying around the bedside .

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#35
Feb 6, 2014
 
Be honest and believe in yourself. Learn to admit mistakes. And don't hesitate to ask questions.

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#36
Feb 7, 2014
 
Bond with Your Team

Build good will by offering to help colleagues in a difficult situation. Hopefully, they'll return the favor. Get to know your coworkers. "Socialization is so important," says Patricia McLaughlin, MSN, staff nurse at the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. "You don't have to go out to lunch or send birthday cards, but at least find out about people." As a new nurse, you're vulnerable to being dumped on, so being a team player can help prevent that from happening.

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#37
Feb 10, 2014
 
don’t be tempted to skip breaks just because you are swamped. those are the times you really NEED to take a break.

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#38
Feb 11, 2014
 
Plan ahead. Don't wait until you graduate or take boards to take action toward finding a job. Working as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) while you are in school can give you valuable experience and expose you to people who might be valuable to you later on when you are searching for a job, especially if you make a favorable impression. While still in school, look for internships and externships that may lead to future employment. If you do get a position as a CNA, intern, or extern, try to find a mentor and cultivate that relationship.

Before you graduate, take advantage of any services offered by your school's career center. Take the NCLEX as soon as you can. You won't be considered without passing it. Get your resume in order and don't neglect to portray your specific skillset. Make sure your resume is tailored to the job you are seeking.

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#39
Feb 12, 2014
 
Continue your education. If you have an associate's degree, consider going on to get your bachelor's degree now, rather than later. Many hospitals have the luxury right now of hiring only nurses with bachelor's degrees. Consider pursuing advanced education to prepare you to work in areas of emerging or growing demand such as geriatrics, chronic disease, genetics, and informatics.

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#40
Feb 13, 2014
 
De-clutter Have you ever considered what goes to waste when nurses and other health care professionals hoard supplies at patients' bedsides? When patients leave, housekeepers discard many of the supplies left in their rooms, often still clean and re-usable. Try to take only what you need and return unused supplies. Plus, a de-cluttered room will facilitate healing. There's no searching through piles, and the room feels more open and clean.

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