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Since: Apr 13

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#1 Aug 26, 2013
No matter where you work, DO NOT talk bad about any of your coworkers, EVER...because they WILL find out.

Don't participate in any of the gossip that goes on. If you hear it, just ignore it. Don't run and tell someone else or the person being talked about. Just go about your business.

This is honestly the best advice I can think of to give a new nurse just starting out on the floor somewhere. Just do your job.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#2 Aug 27, 2013
stay outta the politics. Things can and will come back and bite you in the end, in more ways than one.

“Unions are still scum ”

Since: Dec 07

Atlanta

#3 Aug 27, 2013
nurseamyg wrote:
No matter where you work, DO NOT talk bad about any of your coworkers, EVER...because they WILL find out.
Don't participate in any of the gossip that goes on. If you hear it, just ignore it. Don't run and tell someone else or the person being talked about. Just go about your business.
This is honestly the best advice I can think of to give a new nurse just starting out on the floor somewhere. Just do your job.
While that is good advice, whats the chance of that happening. If there is one thing I know, RN's are some of the most negative folks around.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#4 Aug 28, 2013
how can you say that?

“Unions are still scum ”

Since: Dec 07

Atlanta

#5 Aug 28, 2013
nurseamyg wrote:
how can you say that?
Because it is absolutely true. At least for hospital RN's.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#6 Aug 29, 2013
yep it is true for some. I have also noticed it but I think it just depends on the personality of nurses we encounter.

“Unions are still scum ”

Since: Dec 07

Atlanta

#7 Aug 29, 2013
nurseamyg wrote:
yep it is true for some. I have also noticed it but I think it just depends on the personality of nurses we encounter.
nurseamy, I have to ask, do you work in a hospital setting or at an MD's office?

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#8 Sep 2, 2013
it doesn't matter where I work. im just sharing ideas and opinions

“Unions are still scum ”

Since: Dec 07

Atlanta

#9 Sep 2, 2013
nurseamyg wrote:
it doesn't matter where I work. im just sharing ideas and opinions
It does matter. I find that an MD office has a more loyal staff, where a hospital setting has the more negative influence, the gossip, and back stabbing. All RN's know that their worst enemy is another nurse......they are like cannabals eating their own.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#10 Sep 2, 2013
yep i encountered many RNs who are like that but still there are also many RNs who are genuine inspite of all the negative energies in the workplace

“Unions are still scum ”

Since: Dec 07

Atlanta

#11 Sep 2, 2013
nurseamyg wrote:
yep i encountered many RNs who are like that but still there are also many RNs who are genuine inspite of all the negative energies in the workplace
Thats true but in a major facility they are the rarity.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#12 Sep 3, 2013
well I guess Im just lucky then.hehe

Since: Apr 13

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#13 Sep 5, 2013
hmm.. another tip: listen and be patient with your co-workers (even though they are annoying most of the time)

Since: Apr 13

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#14 Sep 9, 2013
love your job so wont feel like working

Since: Apr 13

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#15 Sep 9, 2013
learn from the meore xperienced nurses

Since: Apr 13

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#16 Oct 3, 2013
I've trained or helped train a few new nurses, with some success, and I just heard from one (not trained by me) leaving orientation who is scared, so I thought I would barf up some pearls of wisdom that seem to have helped new nurses the most. Some read this blog, so perhaps they will add comments. I train ER nurses because I'm an ER nurse, but I learned a lot of this on the floor. I vividly remember one of my first shifts as a new RN on my own. I had four patients on a day shift, all four needed something relatively important right then, and I felt rooted to the floor with fear. I literally didn't know what to do next. I had an overwhelming feeling I was going to burst into tears and run screaming out of the unit. I picked the absolute wrong solution and just started picking tasks so I'd be doing SOMETHING.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#17 Oct 4, 2013
In case you’re not already aware of this, the job market for ALL nurses across the country is very
tight right now with a few exceptions such as Texas, New Mexico, Phoenix area and a few
others. Some new nurses think this challenge exists only in their home state. And some seasoned
nurses think new grads are having trouble finding work because they’re being too picky. Neither
of these perspectives is accurate. We all, new and seasoned nurses alike, must face the reality of
the current job market and do what we can to support one another, especially our new nurses.
New graduate nurses are being affected most profoundly, as many cannot find nursing jobs.
Some are still looking for work a year or more after graduation.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#18 Oct 9, 2013
Start attending local chapter meetings of professional associations such as the Association of
Nurses Executives (AONE), your state chapter of the American Nurses Association, and any
specialty association that interests you (e.g. Emergency Nurses Association). Here’s where you’ll
meet the department managers that you’ve been trying to get to. You can attend as a guest if you
don’t belong. When there’s something you want to do, it makes sense to rub elbows with those
already doing that thing.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#19 Oct 17, 2013
Get yourself a conservative business suit – preferably skirted for a women and a traditional suit
for a man. Looking top notch will make you feel more confident and make the best possible
impression.

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#20 Oct 18, 2013
“Being a nurse will change your life. It changes your outlook on a lot of things--makes you more passionate about some, thankful for some and just down-right mad about others,” Vella said, adding that the best part of being a nurse is “getting to genuinely make a difference in someone’s life. When a patient tells you ‘thank you for saving my life,’ you can’t help but to be proud. When you get to watch a patient that you didn’t know would live or not walk out of a hospital and know that you are a part of the reason they can live again, you can’t explain the feeling!”

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