Gov. Nixon hopes to prepare more stud...

Gov. Nixon hopes to prepare more students for careers in high-demand mental health care fields

There are 6 comments on the Home story from Dec 22, 2013, titled Gov. Nixon hopes to prepare more students for careers in high-demand mental health care fields. In it, Home reports that:

Gov. Jay Nixon has announced that his balanced budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2015 will include $20 million in grants for Missouri's public colleges and universities to educate an additional 1,200 students for careers in high-demand mental health care fields through the Governor's Caring for Missourians: Mental Health initiative.

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HumanSpirit

Lake Butler, FL

#1 Dec 22, 2013
considering the falsehood of the industry lets hope this proposal governorr happens.

US Kids Represent Psychiatric Drug Goldmine
Column: Evelyn Pringle

Prescriptions for psychiatric drugs increased 50 percent with children in the US, and 73 percent among adults, from 1996 to 2006, according to a study in the May/June 2009 issue of the journal Health Affairs. Another study in the same issue of Health Affairs found spending for mental health care grew more than 30 percent over the same ten-year period, with almost all of the increase due to psychiatric drug costs.

Pasted from < http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL0912/S00122.... ;
HumanSpirit

Lake Butler, FL

#2 Dec 22, 2013
The (APA) DSM-V is the future version of the Mein Kampf.

Bombs and bullets will be replaced with mind drugs and psychotherapy (false memory) in future generations.

That's certainly what Aldus Huxley predicted with his fictional Soma and it came true

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Here is the agenda of the Mental Health in the take over of the Judiciary Branch of government (by state) on the problem the industry caused in the USA.(Drug America) This is a similar takeover to what happen in the Public School System.

Mental Health Court by State links

http://www.ncsc.org/topics/problem-solving-co...
HumanSpirit

Lake Butler, FL

#3 Dec 22, 2013
U.S. judges admit to jailing children for money

PHILADELPHIA | Thu Feb 12, 2009 5:36pm EST
(Reuters)- Two judges pleaded guilty on Thursday to accepting more than $2.6 million from a private youth detention center in Pennsylvania in return for giving hundreds of youths and teenagers long sentences.

Pasted from < http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/02/12/us-... ;

Judges Mark Ciavarella and Michael Conahan of the Court of Common Pleas in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, entered plea agreements in federal court in Scranton admitting that they took payoffs from PA Childcare and a sister company, Western PA Childcare, between 2003 and 2006.

"Your statement that I have disgraced my judgeship is true," Ciavarella wrote in a letter to the court. "My actions have destroyed everything I worked to accomplish and I have only myself to blame."

Conahan, who along with Ciavarella faces up to seven years in prison, did not make any comment on the case.

When someone is sent to a detention center, the company running the facility receives money from the county government to defray the cost of incarceration. So as more children were sentenced to the detention center, PA Childcare and Western PA Childcare received more money from the government, prosecutors said.
Teenagers who came before Ciavarella in juvenile court often were sentenced to detention centers for minor offenses that would typically have been classified as misdemeanors, according to the Juvenile Law Center, a Philadelphia nonprofit group.
One 17-year-old boy was sentenced to three months' detention for being in the company of another minor caught shoplifting.
Others were given similar sentences for "simple assault" resulting from a schoolyard scuffle that would normally draw a warning, a spokeswoman for the Juvenile Law Center said.
The Constitution guarantees the right to legal representation in U.S. courts. But many of the juveniles appeared before Ciavarella without an attorney because they were told by the probation service that their minor offenses didn't require one.
Marsha Levick, chief counsel for the Juvenile Law Center, estimated that of approximately 5,000 juveniles who came before Ciavarella from 2003 and 2006, between 1,000 and 2,000 received excessively harsh detention sentences. She said the center will sue the judges, PA Childcare and Western PA Childcare for financial compensation for their victims.
"That judges would allow their greed to trump the rights of defendants is just obscene," Levick said.
The judges attempted to hide their income from the scheme by creating false records and routing payments through intermediaries, prosecutors said.
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court removed Ciavarella and Conahan from their duties after federal prosecutors filed charges on January 26. The court has also appointed a judge to review all the cases involved.

Pasted from < http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/02/12/us-... ;

United States of America v. Mark Ciavarella, Jr. and Michael Conahan
Middle District of Pennsylvania Docket Number 3:CR-09-00028

Pasted from < http://www.justice.gov/usao/pam/Victim_Witnes... ;
HumanSpirit

Lake Butler, FL

#4 Dec 22, 2013
There is no science and there has never been a cure for mental illness.

There is no medical model. No evidence based medicine and the Mental Health / Pharmaceutical industry lied about Chemical imbalance to drug the population. There is no imaging (MRI) to declare a defective brain from a normal brain.

The Mental Health Industry is political and based on hearsay. The court shouldn't except hearsay.

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Psychiatry "No Science"


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Psychiatry: An Industry of Death, Introduction

http://www.youtube.com/watch...
HumanSpirit

High Springs, FL

#5 Dec 23, 2013
Psychiatric Diagnosis: Too Little Science, Too Many Conflicts of Interest [i]

Paula J. Caplan, Ph.D.

Harvard University

Snip:

The Concerns

There is a lot of pain and suffering in the world, and it is tempting to believe that the mental health community knows how to help. It is widely believed, both by mental health professionals and the general population, that if only a person gets the right psychiatric diagnosis, the therapist will know what kind of measures will be the most helpful. Unfortunately, that is not usually the case, and getting a psychiatric diagnosis can often create more problems than it solves, including a lifetime of being labeled, difficulties with obtaining affordable (or any) health insurance (due to now having a pre-existing condition), loss of employment, loss of child custody, the overlooking of physical illnesses and injuries because of everything being attributed to psychological factors, and the loss of the right to make decisions about one’s medical and legal affairs. The creation and use of psychiatric diagnosis, unlike, for instance, psychiatric drugs, is not overseen by any regulatory body, and rarely does anyone raise the question of what role the assignment of a psychiatric label has played in creating problems for individuals.[ii]

The Problematic History

These serious limitations have not prevented the authors of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), sometimes known as “the therapist’s Bible,” from making expansive claims about their knowledge and authority and wielding enormous power to decide who will and will not be called mentally ill and what the varieties of alleged mental illness will be. The DSM’s current edition is called DSM-IV-TR, and it was preceded by the original DSM (in 1952), then DSM-II (1968), DSM-III (1980), DSM-III-R (Third Edition Revised)(1987), DSM-IV (1994), and DSM-IV-TR (2000). The DSM-V is currently in preparation and slated for 2013 publication. Each time a new edition appears, the media ask whichever psychiatrist is the lead editor why a new edition was necessary, and like clockwork, each editor replies that it was because the previous edition really wasn’t scientific (Caplan, 1995). And each time a new edition appears, it contains many more categories than does the previous one. For instance, DSM-III-R contained 297 categories, and DSM-IV contained 374 (Caplan, 1995).

I served as an advisor to two of the DSM-IV committees, before resigning due to serious concerns after witnessing how fast and loose they play with the scientific research related to diagnosis (Caplan, 1995). The DSM is widely used, not only in the mental health system, but also in general medical practice, in schools, and in the courts. I have been involved since 1985 in trying to alert both therapists and the public to the manual’s unscientific nature and the dangers that believing in its objectivity poses. Since then, I have watched with interest a national trend toward gradually increasing openness to the idea that psychiatric diagnosis (A)is largely unscientific,(B)is highly subjective and political, and (C)can cause untold harm, ranging from the patients’ lowered self-confidence to loss of custody of children to loss of health insurance (because any psychiatric label can be considered evidence of a pre-existing condition) to loss of the right to make decisions about their medical and legal affairs.

More of this article:

http://awpsych.org/index.php...
HumanSpirit

High Springs, FL

#6 Dec 24, 2013
Inside the Battle to Define Mental Illness

Every so often Al Frances says something that seems to surprise even him. Just now, for instance, in the predawn darkness of his comfortable, rambling home in Carmel, California, he has broken off his exercise routine to declare that “there is no definition of a mental disorder. It’s bullshit. I mean, you just can’t define it.” Then an odd, reflective look crosses his face, as if he’s taking in the strangeness of this scene: Allen Frances, lead editor of the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (universally known as the DSM-IV), the guy who wrote the book on mental illness, confessing that “these concepts are virtually impossible to define precisely with bright lines at the boundaries.” For the first time in two days, the conversation comes to an awkward halt.

Pasted from < http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/12/ff_dsmv... ;

There are no genetic tests, no brain scans, blood tests, chemical imbalance tests or X-rays that can scientifically/medically prove that any psychiatric disorder is a medical condition.

http://www.topix.com/med

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