Smartphones Help Trappers Wrangle Feral Hogs

Jun 13, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: NBC Miami

Trappers are capturing feral hogs in traps with cameras that link to smartphones so the traps can be triggered remotely.

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#1
Jun 13, 2013
 

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Okay, first let me admit I did not watch the video.
Now, if someone did and my questions are answered in the video - I'm sorry.
First - how are they feeding them?
Second - what are they doing with them?(which is why I did not watch the video.
I understand fully the necessity of 'thinning the herd' so don't jump all over me. However, being a vegetarian, you know where my sympathies lies. That's why I'm very curious as to where these pigs are going? I'm not one of the die hard vegs that feel people should starve, esp when there are so many people starving on this globe.

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#2
Jun 13, 2013
 

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And to think I cant even pick mine up without buttdialing someone...
I may as well be the ferel hog..
:(
damm phone

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#3
Jun 13, 2013
 

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Exactly what app is that?

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#4
Jun 13, 2013
 

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reebie wrote:
And to think I cant even pick mine up without buttdialing someone...
I may as well be the ferel hog..
:(
damm phone
Maybe next time you'll butt dial and a herd of feral hogs will come running.

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#5
Jun 13, 2013
 
T Turner wrote:
<quoted text>
Maybe next time you'll butt dial and a herd of feral hogs will come running.
...I'm just guessing, anything like a Butt-fumble?....lol...

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#6
Jun 13, 2013
 

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T Turner wrote:
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Maybe next time you'll butt dial and a herd of feral hogs will come running.
I'd be careful how you troll Reebs...she's a trained killer.

True story bro'...

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#7
Jun 13, 2013
 

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T Turner wrote:
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Maybe next time you'll butt dial and a herd of feral hogs will come running.
lol..! I can save the hogs. haha...
:)

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#8
Jun 13, 2013
 
T Turner wrote:
Okay, first let me admit I did not watch the video.
Now, if someone did and my questions are answered in the video - I'm sorry.
First - how are they feeding them?
Second - what are they doing with them?(which is why I did not watch the video.
I understand fully the necessity of 'thinning the herd' so don't jump all over me. However, being a vegetarian, you know where my sympathies lies. That's why I'm very curious as to where these pigs are going? I'm not one of the die hard vegs that feel people should starve, esp when there are so many people starving on this globe.
Feral hogs are considered by farmers and sportsmen to be a destructive menace. Many states allow shooting them as "varmints",with no season-no limit. Some people live trap them for feeding out for the market. Others shoot them and let them lay. A single mature sow can produce up to three litters a year with anywhere from 6-9 piglets per litter. They become sexually mature at two or three. Even if 1/2 the piglets are female,extrapolate that and do the math. Feral hogs,even a small band can devastate a planted field overnight.

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#9
Jun 14, 2013
 
okimar wrote:
<quoted text>Feral hogs are considered by farmers and sportsmen to be a destructive menace. Many states allow shooting them as "varmints",with no season-no limit. Some people live trap them for feeding out for the market. Others shoot them and let them lay. A single mature sow can produce up to three litters a year with anywhere from 6-9 piglets per litter. They become sexually mature at two or three. Even if 1/2 the piglets are female,extrapolate that and do the math. Feral hogs,even a small band can devastate a planted field overnight.
Thanks, yes I did read the article. I just don't like the image of slaughter in my head. I guess I really should just google it. I was just thinking that if they reproduce that fast, kept in pens, would it be worth the food to slaughter them and use them for food. Thanks for answering tho - it is appreciated.

“They often call me Speedo”

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#10
Jun 14, 2013
 

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T Turner wrote:
<quoted text> I just don't like the image of slaughter in my head.
<<i get that image everytime i go to mcdonalds, taco bell and kfc>>

<<of course the image of that kid licking all those taco shells is just as frightening>>

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Jun 14, 2013
 

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Speedo54 wrote:
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<<i get that image everytime i go to mcdonalds, taco bell and kfc>>
<<of course the image of that kid licking all those taco shells is just as frightening>>
That was disgusting!

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#12
Jun 14, 2013
 
T Turner wrote:
<quoted text> Thanks, yes I did read the article. I just don't like the image of slaughter in my head. I guess I really should just google it. I was just thinking that if they reproduce that fast, kept in pens, would it be worth the food to slaughter them and use them for food. Thanks for answering tho - it is appreciated.
Just wondering how many diseases and different type worms, one might catch....by eating feral hogs that have never seen any vet?......

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#13
Jun 14, 2013
 
Go Blue Forever wrote:
<quoted text>Just wondering how many diseases and different type worms, one might catch....by eating feral hogs that have never seen any vet?......
That's a very good point. What about deer?

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#14
Jun 14, 2013
 
Go Blue Forever wrote:
<quoted text>Just wondering how many diseases and different type worms, one might catch....by eating feral hogs that have never seen any vet?......
<<Thanks for that visual - I've got pork loin chops pulled out for tonight>>

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#15
Jun 14, 2013
 
Go Blue Forever wrote:
<quoted text>Just wondering how many diseases and different type worms, one might catch....by eating feral hogs that have never seen any vet?......
Pork,any pork must be thoroughly cooked. Swine by their very nature carry parasites other food animals don't,whether feral or domesticated.

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#16
Jun 14, 2013
 
T Turner wrote:
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That's a very good point. What about deer?
The major concern with cervines(deer family) would be CWD (Chronic Wasting Disease). This is caused by a fly that carries the virus. It affecdts the central nervous system. Similar to mad cow disease. The deer however is safe to eat as long as none of the nerve related tissue(brain,spinal column)comes in contact with the venison being processed. As with all meats cook thoroughly.

“They often call me Speedo”

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#17
Jun 14, 2013
 
okimar wrote:
<quoted text>Pork,any pork must be thoroughly cooked. Swine by their very nature carry parasites other food animals don't,whether feral or domesticated.
<<Not anymore>>

<<In the old days (like even into the 40's and 50's) swine could be infected with a parasite called trichinosis. If injested by a human in undercooked pork, it could infect the human; it's a very painful muscle-infesting worm, basically>>

<<Now that it's been all but eradicated in the US, pink pork is not a problem anymore. I never cook a tenderloin past medium, and usually more medium rare>>

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#18
Jun 14, 2013
 
okimar wrote:
<quoted text>Pork,any pork must be thoroughly cooked. Swine by their very nature carry parasites other food animals don't,whether feral or domesticated.
<<The new cooking recommendations clarify long-held perceptions about cooking pork. Historically, consumers have viewed the color pink in pork to be a sign of undercooked meat. If raw pork is cooked to 145 F and allowed to rest for three minutes, it may still be pink but is safe to eat. The pink color can be due to the cooking method, added ingredients, or other factors. As always, cured pork (e.g., cured ham and cured pork chops) will remain pink after cooking.>>

<< http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/NR... >>

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#19
Jun 14, 2013
 
Speedo54 wrote:
<quoted text>
<<Not anymore>>
<<In the old days (like even into the 40's and 50's) swine could be infected with a parasite called trichinosis. If injested by a human in undercooked pork, it could infect the human; it's a very painful muscle-infesting worm, basically>>
<<Now that it's been all but eradicated in the US, pink pork is not a problem anymore. I never cook a tenderloin past medium, and usually more medium rare>>
A film, we all saw in school....probably in the 1960's, made be think of those worms in pork, immediately...and with zero innoculations for a lifetime, i would likely pass on ferals as a food source....Sad too, as i am a B-B-Q'ing fool.....Pork's my best meat on the charcoal grill.....
2muchgov

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#20
Jun 16, 2013
 
I am not a hunter nor am i vegaterian so I dont simpithize either party. But was out in a public forest and saw the devastation that these hogs did first hand. I don't know how many were involved but to my amazement as far as my eyes could see it looked like a bottom plow had been ran through the woods with no vegitation left on the ground but big trees that they could not root up with their amazing powerful snoots. Our government cannot be that worried about it because they have regulations on hunting hogs. First you must have a lisence to hunt them but not one on your own land. You can't hunt them by any means either, you have to use the appropriate weapon for that season. I see them on a neihbors land but for some reason they don't come on to mine, leaving them safe to do the damage they want because the land owner is vegetarian and doesn't allow hunting witch is his rite. But if you look at it wild life management is also at the same time while saying they need to go is also making money just enough regulations to where they really aren't going to go away anytime soon. They trap them on prison land to feed the prisoners which saves tax payers money. There are a lot of different angles to look at this (so called problem) I thought I would toss out A few thoughts that have ran through my mind and would appreciate any thoughts of yours even the smartellics are welcome to cash in.

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