Level 9

Since: Aug 08

.

#21 Mar 4, 2013
Srrip the teacher of their citizenship, then deport them.

Since: Jan 07

Location Shown

#22 Mar 4, 2013
TenderTink wrote:
<quoted text>
Thank you Big Time.
Am very appreciative of you taking the time to look that up and posting it.
:-)
Your Welcome,

I looked for Texas school first, one had a Mexican flag taken down,

Also had several lines about you have us mixed up with the Califorina school,..LOL

Level 6

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#23 Mar 4, 2013
Big Time wrote:
<quoted text>
Your Welcome,
I looked for Texas school first, one had a Mexican flag taken down,
Also had several lines about you have us mixed up with the California school,..LOL

I've no excuses for the crossed hairs there.
Being somewhat demented,
slightly addled,
and I've slept a few times since 2006.

There is no telling what
this imagination will conjure up next...
and then almost swear it is fact.

Thank goodness I still have
enough where with all to question
my self delusions several times a day.
LOL
;-D))
Wishing you a very good night.

“ASPIRE 2 INSPIRE B4 U EXPIRE”

Level 8

Since: Jul 08

USA

#24 Mar 4, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
You don't understand - it was a Spanish class - not a public speaking class. She refused to recite the Mexican pledge as part of the assignment. It's a college-prep class, not a grade school class - there isn't a lot of wiggle room for alternative assignments or methods. My guess is that she didn't study the assignment and decided to make it an issue to deflect from her shortcomings.
Your "GUESS" is incorrect. Read the article and then maybe, just maybe you can speak with a degree of intelligence on the story.
But, that would actually require you to read and comprehend, and I know that is not your strong suit.

To make it easy, I will even copy the relevant parts for you.

The Thomas More Law Center filed the suit on behalf of Brenda Brinsdon alleging the McAllen Independent School District violated the 15-year-old girl’s constitutional rights when she was forced to recite the Mexican pledge and sing the Mexican national anthem.

Brinsdon, who is the daughter of a Mexican immigrant and an American father, refused. She believed it was un-American to pledge a loyalty oath to another country.

Ironically, the school district has a policy that prohibits a school from compelling students to recite the American Pledge of Allegiance.

The district also has a written policy that excuses students from reciting text from the Declaration of Independence if the student “as determined by the district, has a conscientious objection to the recitation.”

“There is a sad trend in public schools across our nation to undermine American patriotism,” said Richard Thompson president of the Thomas More Law Center.“But it’s encouraging to see students like Brenda stand up for America despite pressure from school officials.”

The TMLC told Fox News the district ignored its own rules when Brinsdon refused to recite the pledge of a foreign country.

What’s most troubling is the different treatment for someone wanting to opt out of reciting the American Pledge of Allegiance compared to someone as a matter of conscience wants to opt out of reciting the Mexican pledge,” spokesman Erin Mersino told Fox News.

The recitation of the Mexican pledge and the singing of the Mexican national anthem was part of a 2011 Spanish class assignment at Achieve Early College High School. The teacher, Reyna Santos, required all her students to participate in the lesson.

When Brinsdon refused to back down – she was punished, the lawsuit alleges. She was given an alternative assignment on the Independence of Mexico. The teacher gave her a failing grade – and then required the student to sit in class over a period of several days to listen to other students recite the Mexican flag.

The lawsuit states Brinsdon offered to recite the American pledge in Spanish but the teacher refused her request.

“It’s astonishing that this Texas school would deny Brenda her right of conscience and free speech not to pledge allegiance to a foreign country,” said Thompson.“Too many Americans – including those of Mexican descent – have suffered and died protecting our nation.”

And while she is fluent in Spanish and English and is proud of her Mexican heritage, Brinsdon is a “true-blooded American,” Mersino added.

Mersino said it was especially troubling to watch video of students in the class standing up, extending their arms straight out, palms down and reciting the pledge of a foreign country.

“It’s disturbing – it truly was troubling,” she said.

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#25 Mar 5, 2013
65007noogard wrote:
<quoted text>
Spanish class has nothing to do with the Mexican flag or it's national anthem. Saying pledges to another national's flag or it's anthem has no place in a U.S class room, IMO.
The U.S. anthem and allegiance could have been said in Spanish.
Have you ever taken a pre- or collegiate level course? If you have, then you will realize that you are at the mercy of the professor that designs the agenda and curriculum for the course. College-level courses are not very forgiving - including pre-college courses. I am not defending anyone's actions here, but after spending the better part of nearly a decade in college, I will tell you that college and pre-college course curriculum is very specific. I've had to use audit status on plenty of courses that my rendition of the term paper and the professor's were not even close. If you take a French course, you are required to recite the "La Marseillaise" - in French. If you take Russian, you will normally be required to recite the State Anthem of the Russian Federation - in Russian. This case is not about what she felt was her right of free speech (since everyone else in the class recited the assignment), but rather her decision or ability to not complete the course's required assignments. Read the article again - the assignment was not for her to recite anything in Spanish but the Mexico anthem, which she could not (re: would not).

I'd fail her if I were the teacher/professor.

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#26 Mar 5, 2013
REDNECK HIPPIE wrote:
<quoted text>
Your "GUESS" is incorrect. Read the article and then maybe, just maybe you can speak with a degree of intelligence on the story.
But, that would actually require you to read and comprehend, and I know that is not your strong suit.
To make it easy, I will even copy the relevant parts for you.
The Thomas More Law Center filed the suit on behalf of Brenda Brinsdon alleging the McAllen Independent School District violated the 15-year-old girl’s constitutional rights when she was forced to recite the Mexican pledge and sing the Mexican national anthem.
Brinsdon, who is the daughter of a Mexican immigrant and an American father, refused. She believed it was un-American to pledge a loyalty oath to another country.
Ironically, the school district has a policy that prohibits a school from compelling students to recite the American Pledge of Allegiance.
The district also has a written policy that excuses students from reciting text from the Declaration of Independence if the student “as determined by the district, has a conscientious objection to the recitation.”
“There is a sad trend in public schools across our nation to undermine American patriotism,” said Richard Thompson president of the Thomas More Law Center.“But it’s encouraging to see students like Brenda stand up for America despite pressure from school officials.”
The TMLC told Fox News the district ignored its own rules when Brinsdon refused to recite the pledge of a foreign country.
What’s most troubling is the different treatment for someone wanting to opt out of reciting the American Pledge of Allegiance compared to someone as a matter of conscience wants to opt out of reciting the Mexican pledge,” spokesman Erin Mersino told Fox News.
The recitation of the Mexican pledge and the singing of the Mexican national anthem was part of a 2011 Spanish class assignment at Achieve Early College High School. The teacher, Reyna Santos, required all her students to participate in the lesson.
When Brinsdon refused to back down – she was punished, the lawsuit alleges. She was given an alternative assignment on the Independence of Mexico. The teacher gave her a failing grade – and then required the student to sit in class over a period of several days to listen to other students recite the Mexican flag.
The lawsuit states Brinsdon offered to recite the American pledge in Spanish but the teacher refused her request.
“It’s astonishing that this Texas school would deny Brenda her right of conscience and free speech not to pledge allegiance to a foreign country,” said Thompson.“Too many Americans – including those of Mexican descent – have suffered and died protecting our nation.”
And while she is fluent in Spanish and English and is proud of her Mexican heritage, Brinsdon is a “true-blooded American,” Mersino added.
Mersino said it was especially troubling to watch video of students in the class standing up, extending their arms straight out, palms down and reciting the pledge of a foreign country.
“It’s disturbing – it truly was troubling,” she said.
I read it, but I don't think you did.

"The recitation of the Mexican pledge and the singing of the Mexican national anthem was part of a 2011 Spanish class assignment at Achieve Early College High School. The teacher, Reyna Santos, required all her students to participate in the lesson."

It was an course assignment - one with which she failed at completing. As always, you're reaching again - incorrectly, I might add.

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#27 Mar 5, 2013
Masterscout wrote:
<quoted text>
Hey U-na-li milwaukee69... she didn't refuse to speak Spanish... she refused to say the Mexican oath and salute the Mexican flag... what part of "She even said that she would say the American pledge in Spanish, but that was not acceptable.” Don’t you understand. Chah-lah-kee with your posts, you will need it.
Have you ever taken an advanced foriegn language class?

Advanced foriegn language classes dig more into not only the language of a country, but its culture as well. Here, I'll do the homework for you folks, just so you know what kind of course this actually is:

http://voices.yahoo.com/how-prepare-college-l...

Here's a typical syllabus for a college-level Spanish course:

http://academics.northland.edu/spanish/spanis...

Cornell University has an excellent foriegn language department:

http://www.cornellcollege.edu/spanish/curricu...

“ASPIRE 2 INSPIRE B4 U EXPIRE”

Level 8

Since: Jul 08

USA

#28 Mar 5, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
I read it, but I don't think you did.
"The recitation of the Mexican pledge and the singing of the Mexican national anthem was part of a 2011 Spanish class assignment at Achieve Early College High School. The teacher, Reyna Santos, required all her students to participate in the lesson."
It was an course assignment - one with which she failed at completing. As always, you're reaching again - incorrectly, I might add.
You "GUESS" I'm reaching again, or do you know I am. If the school district has a policy that allows a student to not recite the American pledge of allegiance, then it would stand to reason, that to force a student to recite a foreign pledge of allegiance would also be against the school district policy. The school district blinked on this one and she put them on notice.

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#29 Mar 5, 2013
REDNECK HIPPIE wrote:
<quoted text>
You "GUESS" I'm reaching again, or do you know I am. If the school district has a policy that allows a student to not recite the American pledge of allegiance, then it would stand to reason, that to force a student to recite a foreign pledge of allegiance would also be against the school district policy. The school district blinked on this one and she put them on notice.
This has nothing to do with the school district. It is a voluntary class that she enrolled in. She was not forced to do anything - it is an elective class in an exclusive school for advanced and pre-college students.

The assignment, which was completed by the rest of her class, was part of the curriculum for the class - it had nothing at all to do with the fact that she was American.

She never studied for this assignment and decided that she would take the only other route besides earning a failing grade.

And...the title of the article is mis-leading as well - the entire class was American, not just her.

I can see that you've never taken an advanced foriegn language class before - which is ok, I can understand your shortcomings.

“I was a Grim Reaper”

Level 8

Since: Apr 07

But now I take antidepressants

#30 Mar 5, 2013
Pledging allegiance to Mexico would be treason.... http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/treaso...
trea·son
[tree-zuhn] Show IPA
noun

2.
a violation of allegiance to one's sovereign or to one's state......

“Geaux Tigers!”

Level 9

Since: Jun 12

Down on the bayou

#31 Mar 5, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Have you ever taken a pre- or collegiate level course? If you have, then you will realize that you are at the mercy of the professor that designs the agenda and curriculum for the course. College-level courses are not very forgiving - including pre-college courses. I am not defending anyone's actions here, but after spending the better part of nearly a decade in college, I will tell you that college and pre-college course curriculum is very specific. I've had to use audit status on plenty of courses that my rendition of the term paper and the professor's were not even close. If you take a French course, you are required to recite the "La Marseillaise" - in French. If you take Russian, you will normally be required to recite the State Anthem of the Russian Federation - in Russian. This case is not about what she felt was her right of free speech (since everyone else in the class recited the assignment), but rather her decision or ability to not complete the course's required assignments. Read the article again - the assignment was not for her to recite anything in Spanish but the Mexico anthem, which she could not (re: would not).
I'd fail her if I were the teacher/professor.
Took college level Spanish about 3 or 4 semesters ago. We were not required at any point to recite a Spanish-speaking country's pledge.

No where in the article did it say that she could not recited the Mexico anthem.

“Geaux Tigers!”

Level 9

Since: Jun 12

Down on the bayou

#32 Mar 5, 2013
Damn! There's those Engrish typos again.

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#33 Mar 5, 2013
65007noogard wrote:
<quoted text>
Took college level Spanish about 3 or 4 semesters ago. We were not required at any point to recite a Spanish-speaking country's pledge.
No where in the article did it say that she could not recited the Mexico anthem.
But realisticlly, why would she not recite it? I don't buy into the whole "freedom of speech" bit - look up this school online - they only have approximately 280 students, all gifted. It's an exclusive school - not the type that you or I would attend. Like I said, you not only learn a country's language, but culture as well - I wonder if she used her "American" name or her Mexican-given name in the class? I also wonder why, since one of her parents was indeed Mexican, why she was even taking a college-prep Spanish course in the first place.

I said I guessed that she didn't do the assignment - I never said it was fact.

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#34 Mar 5, 2013
REDNECK HIPPIE wrote:
<quoted text>
You "GUESS" I'm reaching again, or do you know I am. If the school district has a policy that allows a student to not recite the American pledge of allegiance, then it would stand to reason, that to force a student to recite a foreign pledge of allegiance would also be against the school district policy. The school district blinked on this one and she put them on notice.
And if the shoe were on the other foot and she was told she had to recite the US Pledge of Allegiance in Spanish - guess what?

Yep -$100 says this fruitcake would've said, "Nope - ain't gonna' do it."

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#35 Mar 5, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Have you ever taken an advanced foriegn language class?
Advanced foriegn language classes dig more into not only the language of a country, but its culture as well. Here, I'll do the homework for you folks, just so you know what kind of course this actually is:
http://voices.yahoo.com/how-prepare-college-l...
Here's a typical syllabus for a college-level Spanish course:
http://academics.northland.edu/spanish/spanis...
Cornell University has an excellent foriegn language department:
http://www.cornellcollege.edu/spanish/curricu...
O-si-yo milwaukee69,¿qué pasa contigo mi amigo?

Publique un enlace a un típico programa para un curso de Español de nivel universitario y en ninguna parte en el plan de estudios existe mención alguna de hacer un estudiante americano recitar el juramento de fidelidad mexicana o rendir homenaje a la bandera mexicana como un miembro pequeño buenos modales de la "juventud hitleriana, Liga de la juventud alemana del trabajador" durante la guerra-mundo-dos.

Después de retirar el español referenciado enlace y no apoyó su opinión, ignora a los demás.

Sin embargo, tiene un buen día delirante de todos modos…

Do-na-da'-go-hv i

BTW, Your question: Have you ever taken an advanced foriegn language class? My English teacher always said 'English' was my foriegn language. Para mí que es griego LOL

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#36 Mar 5, 2013
Masterscout wrote:
<quoted text>
O-si-yo milwaukee69,¿qué pasa contigo mi amigo?
Publique un enlace a un típico programa para un curso de Español de nivel universitario y en ninguna parte en el plan de estudios existe mención alguna de hacer un estudiante americano recitar el juramento de fidelidad mexicana o rendir homenaje a la bandera mexicana como un miembro pequeño buenos modales de la "juventud hitleriana, Liga de la juventud alemana del trabajador" durante la guerra-mundo-dos.
Después de retirar el español referenciado enlace y no apoyó su opinión, ignora a los demás.
Sin embargo, tiene un buen día delirante de todos modos…
Do-na-da'-go-hv i
BTW, Your question: Have you ever taken an advanced foriegn language class? My English teacher always said 'English' was my foriegn language. Para mí que es griego LOL
Você assume tomei Espanhol - não assumir nada.

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#38 Mar 5, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
But realisticlly, why would she not recite it? I don't buy into the whole "freedom of speech" bit - look up this school online - they only have approximately 280 students, all gifted. It's an exclusive school - not the type that you or I would attend. Like I said, you not only learn a country's language, but culture as well - I wonder if she used her "American" name or her Mexican-given name in the class? I also wonder why, since one of her parents was indeed Mexican, why she was even taking a college-prep Spanish course in the first place.
I said I guessed that she didn't do the assignment - I never said it was fact.
Your hedging your bets now Milwaukee... Right here you stated "I said I guessed that she didn't do the assignment - I never said it was fact" while in post #29 you emphatically and unequivocally stated "She never studied for this assignment and decided that she would take the only other route besides earning a failing grade" there never was an ‘I guess’ in your tone.

As for her taking a college-prep Spanish course in the first place… it is quite possible that it was a required course for a degree whether or not she spoke it fluently from childhood or not.

As for all the other students following blindly where the catedrático led… look up the word ‘Lemming’ in the Urban Dictionary.

Like most college instructors this women expected each and every member of her class to follow an unthinking course towards the liberal leaning mass destruction of patriotism.

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#39 Mar 5, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Você assume tomei Espanhol - não assumir nada.
Então, desculpe-me por assumir. Não havia nenhuma indicação que você falava português Milwaukee.

Ele está me fazendo pensar, portanto, eu sou.

Sim? ;-)
phaines

Big Bear Lake, CA

#40 Mar 5, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Você assume tomei Espanhol - não assumir nada.
I can speak spanish on here to , useing a translator...like everyone else...lol

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#41 Mar 5, 2013
Masterscout wrote:
<quoted text>
Your hedging your bets now Milwaukee... Right here you stated "I said I guessed that she didn't do the assignment - I never said it was fact" while in post #29 you emphatically and unequivocally stated "She never studied for this assignment and decided that she would take the only other route besides earning a failing grade" there never was an ‘I guess’ in your tone.
As for her taking a college-prep Spanish course in the first place… it is quite possible that it was a required course for a degree whether or not she spoke it fluently from childhood or not.
As for all the other students following blindly where the catedrático led… look up the word ‘Lemming’ in the Urban Dictionary.
Like most college instructors this women expected each and every member of her class to follow an unthinking course towards the liberal leaning mass destruction of patriotism.
Learning how to listen to and follow directions is the key to any learning experience. Also, this isn't a college, it is a gifted school and she was taking a college-prep course. I wonder what the course curriculum would've read had everybody just done what they want and go willy-nilly in any direction.

Foriegn language courses are not art classes - they do not cater to the freelancer. There is only one way to speak a given language - aside from slang. Learning how to not only speak the language, but to understand what it means in that country of origin is key. Advanced language classes are not for the business major - they are designed for the writer, translator or person who must make a living translating spoken and written word.

College prep classes are very specific in what they teach and their content. Did they go over the top? Meah...maybe, but again - the student is the student, not the teacher. The teacher controls the horizontal and the vertical. I once had a college linear algebra professor that insisted we address him as Bud. He was one of the best professors I ever had - and I aced the course - all because it was on his terms, not mine.

College isn't for everyone - sometimes, depending on the course curriculum - it can be fun. On the other hand, do one tiny thing out of the ordinary any other time and you'll end up back in the same seat next semester.

Perhaps this girl isn't college material afterall.

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