Evolution vs. Creation

Full story: Best of New Orleans

High school senior Zack Kopplin is leading the fight to repeal the Louisiana Science Education Act of 2008.

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“Darwin was right..of course.”

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#78040
Mar 1, 2013
 

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Cybele wrote:
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Real Science can provide the same amount of logic in its language with real evidence. So thank you, I don't need your delusional Darwinian theory.
Sorry my lady....tis you who are delusional.

““You must not lose faith ”

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#78041
Mar 1, 2013
 
TerryL wrote:
<quoted text>It's where the lemon tree grows
Ah and they are so dense that they touch each other at the mere whiff of air, and so that woodtick does not know he's having the frontroomon the south.

Are the buggers self pollinating or do you have to cut a little piece of and replant it...oi presto more forest in the frontroom!

It's like bulbs in pots...equally clueless about lemontrees.

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

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#78042
Mar 1, 2013
 

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Subduction Zone wrote:
<quoted text>
Not "Murphy", you misspelled it. I was talking about Muphry's Law:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muphry 's_law
My favorite Murphy's law...
Even the smallest hole will quickly drain even the largest container; unless it was put there for drainage, in which case it will clog.

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Everett, WA

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#78043
Mar 1, 2013
 

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MAAT wrote:
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Murphy? Talk about the Peter principle.
Now i want an exact layout of woodticks room...whot...frontroom...on the south?
There are two strong reasons for his front room window to be facing south. First he is living in northern Minnesota, he is going to need sunlight for his tree and that almost demands a south facing window. Second he is on the north shore of Lake Superior and for that odds are that he would have a south facing window to see the lake, unless he is on some sort of inlet or bay.

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Everett, WA

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#78044
Mar 1, 2013
 
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>One of our local photographers took pictures of it and sent them into a 'small cabins' site. can't remember which one. single slant roof to let the winter sun in / summer sun out. yes, south front room.
one lemon tree. no bees. no crabs. no intelligent designer.(outside of my brilliant home design...)
And I was late in my reply since I am listening to YouTube (Atheist Experience clip) and I was very slow in my typing.

““You must not lose faith ”

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#78045
Mar 1, 2013
 
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>One of our local photographers took pictures of it and sent them into a 'small cabins' site. can't remember which one. single slant roof to let the winter sun in / summer sun out. yes, south front room.
one lemon tree. no bees. no crabs. no intelligent designer.(outside of my brilliant home design...)
One gigantic wasp that ones a year pollinates the frontroom!
fu.k:)))

Normally i look things up, but lemons must be simply put male+female on one tree. South bigger flower growth, hence bigger lemons. Easier process.

And what if the frontroom was of the north? Would everybody here then alsohave an AHA erlebnis? Or would there be groaning and moaning?

“what we think we become”

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#78046
Mar 1, 2013
 
thewordofme wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry my lady....tis you who are delusional.
honey bee, you are the one!

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

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#78047
Mar 1, 2013
 

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MAAT wrote:
<quoted text>
Ah and they are so dense that they touch each other at the mere whiff of air, and so that woodtick does not know he's having the frontroomon the south.
Are the buggers self pollinating or do you have to cut a little piece of and replant it...oi presto more forest in the frontroom!
It's like bulbs in pots...equally clueless about lemontrees.
yes, when we purchased the tree we were told it is self pollinating so we do not need more than one tree or any artificial pollination techniques.

one does need a vacuum for when all the petals and sepals fall off!

““You must not lose faith ”

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#78048
Mar 1, 2013
 
Subduction Zone wrote:
<quoted text>
There are two strong reasons for his front room window to be facing south. First he is living in northern Minnesota, he is going to need sunlight for his tree and that almost demands a south facing window. Second he is on the north shore of Lake Superior and for that odds are that he would have a south facing window to see the lake, unless he is on some sort of inlet or bay.
You sure your eyelids are unfrozen yet. lol

So it's the FLUD!

Now i am going to look it up. At least now i know where to find the frontroom. Handy if i need some lemons.

““You must not lose faith ”

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#78049
Mar 1, 2013
 
First unload an abstract:

Abstract
Identification of lineage-specific innovations in genomic control elements is critical for understanding transcriptional regulatory networks and phenotypic heterogeneity. We analyzed, from an evolutionary perspective, the binding regions of seven mammalian transcription factors (ESR1, TP53, MYC, RELA, POU5F1, SOX2, and CTCF) identified on a genome-wide scale by different chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches and found that only a minority of sites appear to be conserved at the sequence level. Instead, we uncovered a pervasive association with genomic repeats by showing that a large fraction of the bona fide binding sites for five of the seven transcription factors (ESR1, TP53, POU5F1, SOX2, and CTCF) are embedded in distinctive families of transposable elements. Using the age of the repeats, we established that these repeat-associated binding sites (RABS) have been associated with significant regulatory expansions throughout the mammalian phylogeny. We validated the functional significance of these RABS by showing that they are over-represented in proximity of regulated genes and that the binding motifs within these repeats have undergone evolutionary selection. Our results demonstrate that transcriptional regulatory networks are highly dynamic in eukaryotic genomes and that transposable elements play an important role in expanding the repertoire of binding sites.

Although cross-species conservation has been successfully used to identify functional regulatory sequences in genomes (Thomas et al. 2003; Boffelli et al. 2004; Wang et al. 2006), there is growing evidence that changes in cis-regulatory elements are important in determining key phenotypic differences, as shown in yeast (Ihmels et al. 2005), pufferfish (Tumpel et al. 2006), Drosophila (Gompel et al. 2005; Marcellini and Simpson 2006), and human (Rockman et al. 2005). Moreover, a number of studies have shown that evolutionary turnover of regulatory elements is a common feature of eukaryotic genomes with examples in yeast (Tanay et al. 2005; Borneman et al. 2007; Tuch et al. 2008), Drosophila (Moses et al. 2006), zebrafish (McGaughey et al. 2008), and mammals (Dermitzakis and Clark 2002; Birney et al. 2007; Chabot et al. 2007; Odom et al. 2007; Jegga et al. 2008).

---
He's got a network of transposons in the frontroom!

““You must not lose faith ”

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#78050
Mar 1, 2013
 
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>yes, when we purchased the tree we were told it is self pollinating so we do not need more than one tree or any artificial pollination techniques.
one does need a vacuum for when all the petals and sepals fall off!
Ow, the suspense was killing me!
I even flamed you...wait...

“what we think we become”

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#78051
Mar 1, 2013
 

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MAAT wrote:
<quoted text>
One gigantic wasp that ones a year pollinates the frontroom!
fu.k:)))
Normally i look things up, but lemons must be simply put male+female on one tree. South bigger flower growth, hence bigger lemons. Easier process.
And what if the frontroom was of the north? Would everybody here then alsohave an AHA erlebnis? Or would there be groaning and moaning?
he's manually pollinating his lemon tree or he's got lots of insects in his room. lol

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

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#78052
Mar 1, 2013
 

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TerryL wrote:
<quoted text>It's where the lemon tree grows
lemon tree, very pretty, and the lemon flower is sweet. but the fruit of the lemon, is so very hard to eat!

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

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#78053
Mar 1, 2013
 
Subduction Zone wrote:
<quoted text>
There are two strong reasons for his front room window to be facing south. First he is living in northern Minnesota, he is going to need sunlight for his tree and that almost demands a south facing window. Second he is on the north shore of Lake Superior and for that odds are that he would have a south facing window to see the lake, unless he is on some sort of inlet or bay.
Alas, i am inland form the great lake a few miles so no view of Superior, but i do have a nice view of a waterfall on a trout stream. if i climb the mountain behind us, i can see both Lake superior to the south and canda to the north!

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Everett, WA

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#78054
Mar 1, 2013
 
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>Alas, i am inland form the great lake a few miles so no view of Superior, but i do have a nice view of a waterfall on a trout stream. if i climb the mountain behind us, i can see both Lake superior to the south and canda to the north!
It still sounds like paradise. I used to live in Minneapolis and grew up on a farm thirty miles south of there. I still miss four real seasons instead of the two seasons there are where I am now.

But we do have real mountains here. There are spots in this state where I can see 10,781 ft Mt. Baker to the north and 14,411 ft Mt. Rainier to the south. As the crow flies that is 100 miles to the south and 50 miles to the north. Locally I am half an hour from a mountain that is 5,000 feet high. If you wanted to you could golf in the morning and ski in the afternoon some days. Too bad that I don't golf.

“Leave That Thing Alone!”

Since: Nov 07

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#78055
Mar 1, 2013
 

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woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>lemon tree, very pretty, and the lemon flower is sweet. but the fruit of the lemon, is so very hard to eat!
LOL! That song popped into my head the moment I saw 'lemon tree" in your original post!:D

““You must not lose faith ”

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#78056
Mar 1, 2013
 
Cybele wrote:
<quoted text>
he's manually pollinating his lemon tree or he's got lots of insects in his room. lol
Now i have to look it up and write in in english. lol

It'snot only the position of ERV's , nor the astronomical chance that about 14 are more orless at the same place, but that they have the same function in humans and monkey though the regulation is slightly different.

Lemons can wait a moment...education ongoing.

ABSTRACT

In this study we report main properties of Harbinger DNA transposons identified in protists, plants, insects,
worms, and vertebrates. This is the first superfamily of eukaryotic DNA transposons where all autonomous
transposons, even those that are hosted by species from different kingdoms, encode two proteins: a super-
family-specific transposase and a DNA-binding protein characterized by the presence of the conserved
SANT/myb/trihelix motif. The last motif is known to be important for the DNA binding by different tran-
scription regulators. Therefore, we suggest that this protein is necessary for coordinated expression of the
Harbinger transposase. Although mammalian genomes are free of recognizable remnants of Harbingers, we
identified a widely expressed HARBI1 gene encoding a 350-aa protein entirely derived from a Harbinger trans-
posase some 450500 million years ago. The HARBI1 proteins are conserved in humans, rats, mice, cows,
pigs, chickens, frogs, and various bony fish, as well as other extremely important proteins, including RAG1
and RAG2. Conserved motifs detected in the Harbinger transposases are also well preserved in the HARBI1
proteins. Therefore, the HARBI1 proteins are expected to be nucleases important for functioning of bony ver-
tebrates. We also found that the protein most similar to HARBI1 is encoded by an autonomous Harbinger
3_DR transposon that was transpositionally active in the zebrafish genome a few million years ago. Nonau-
tonomous transposons derived from Harbinger3_DR are characterized by a striking preference for a 17-bp
target site never seen previously in any other DNA transposon. Based on this observation, we suggest that the
hypothetical HARBI1 nucleases are also characterized by a strong DNA-target specificity.
---

““You must not lose faith ”

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#78057
Mar 1, 2013
 
And if we know function we can relate that to time gone by.

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

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#78058
Mar 1, 2013
 
Subduction Zone wrote:
<quoted text>
It still sounds like paradise. I used to live in Minneapolis and grew up on a farm thirty miles south of there. I still miss four real seasons instead of the two seasons there are where I am now.
But we do have real mountains here. There are spots in this state where I can see 10,781 ft Mt. Baker to the north and 14,411 ft Mt. Rainier to the south. As the crow flies that is 100 miles to the south and 50 miles to the north. Locally I am half an hour from a mountain that is 5,000 feet high. If you wanted to you could golf in the morning and ski in the afternoon some days. Too bad that I don't golf.
Ahhh...so you laughed when i said 'mountain'...

they technically are mountains, but my neice and her hubby are out in WA and when they visited and I called them mtns, they kind of laughed...

they recently moved to Forks, for the sole purpose, I believe, to harrass the Twihards...

““You must not lose faith ”

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#78059
Mar 1, 2013
 
In fact, self pollination (selfing) is the most extreme form of inbreeding, and its thus the most powerful tool to accomplish the goal of any form of inbreeding or line-breeding: homozygosity. Homozygosity is Greek for one and the same yoke and is the state of having two identical copies (alleles) of a given gene.

The reason breeders select for homozygosity is because having two identical copies of a specific gene means that the animal will be guaranteed to display the trait associated with that gene and is guaranteed to pass that allele along to its offspring. If that gene is dominant, it will again be guaranteed to be expressed in the offspring, if it is recessive, being homozygous in both parents will guarantee expression in the offspring.

Its selective breeding. Breeders call this quality prepotency.

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