Evolution vs. Creation

Full story: Best of New Orleans

High school senior Zack Kopplin is leading the fight to repeal the Louisiana Science Education Act of 2008.
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69,381 - 69,400 of 112,918 Comments Last updated 1 hr ago

“Leave That Thing Alone!”

Since: Nov 07

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#73735
Feb 4, 2013
 
The Dude wrote:
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Not a point I've argued against. In fact I've pointed that out numerous times when calling fundies out on their mistakes.
Evolution is not atheism. Science is not atheism. Not even science fundies disagree with for religious reasons.
The theological beef is theirs, not mine.
"Theological beef"? It's probably 95% of fat and gristle and only tastes good if you r-e-a-l-l-y believe!

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#73736
Feb 4, 2013
 
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>in fact, another English scientist came up with the same theory working independently in China. when the facts there for all to see, the conclusion is inevitable...

facts and science are fun!
You've been gone for awhile. Welcome back.

Since: Mar 11

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#73737
Feb 4, 2013
 
Langoliers wrote:
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You've been gone for awhile. Welcome back.
Thanx...still pretty much the same ol same ol on this page, huh?

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

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#73738
Feb 4, 2013
 

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TerryL wrote:
<quoted text>"Theological beef"? It's probably 95% of fat and gristle and only tastes good if you r-e-a-l-l-y believe!
Actually, theology is an amazing science.

studying how people will try to rationalize what they know to be a lie is fascinating. even when they can be shown openly that they were lied to, they will try for years to try and twist the lie to support their cult's beliefs....

it's way better than watching rats runa maze, and they can almost feed themslelves....

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#73739
Feb 4, 2013
 

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Chimney1 wrote:
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His answer was clear. We would not expect another animal to evolve into humans all over again. The particulars of environment and the mutations that happened to occur at the times they did will not be precisely replicated again. All creatures evolve, but there is no goal directed at producing us. Even if advanced intelligent life on earth evolves again, it would almost certainly be some different sort of intelligent creature.
This is a deformed explanation. Why are they no longer changing to human forms?

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

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#73740
Feb 4, 2013
 
Charles Idemi wrote:
<quoted text>This is a deformed explanation. Why are they no longer changing to human forms?
Why are WHO not changing into human forms? other proto-humans? your question shows you don't even understand the way evolution works....

there have been several hominid species. you actually have the DNA of Neandertals, another species, in you.

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#73741
Feb 4, 2013
 
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>Thanx...still pretty much the same ol same ol on this page, huh?
Yup.

You remember the sheepdog and coyote cartoons with the time clock?

“I Am No One Else”

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#73742
Feb 4, 2013
 

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Charles Idemi wrote:
<quoted text>This is a deformed explanation. Why are they no longer changing to human forms?
For one, because the term "human" already applies to a specific species.

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#73743
Feb 4, 2013
 

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Aerobatty wrote:
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Have you ever heard of google?
Don't worry.
It only hurts for a lifetime.
Ofcourse. And many other sites including Wikipedia and others.
Show me your evidence.

Since: Mar 11

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#73744
Feb 4, 2013
 

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Langoliers wrote:
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Yup.
You remember the sheepdog and coyote cartoons with the time clock?
"Mornin' Fred."

'Mornin' Ralph"

favorite of mine....

You are correct, the religious believers are continually failing in hairbrained attempts to prove thier beliefs...they are much like the wolf/coyote in that cartoon.

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#73745
Feb 4, 2013
 

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woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>"Mornin' Fred."

'Mornin' Ralph"

favorite of mine....

You are correct, the religious believers are continually failing in hairbrained attempts to prove thier beliefs...they are much like the wolf/coyote in that cartoon.
Yup.

Morning Woodtick. Lol
Wonderingme

Longwood, FL

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#73746
Feb 4, 2013
 

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Langoliers wrote:
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OMG. My missing car!
What 24 year old can afford a 2008 Lambo! Non profit? I think not!!!

Since: Mar 11

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#73747
Feb 4, 2013
 

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Wonderingme wrote:
<quoted text>What 24 year old can afford a 2008 Lambo! Non profit? I think not!!!
My mom thinks I drink too much beer. i like to go to the pub and have a few pints and she added up the total cost of that. "If you had put all that money in a decent investment, you'd have been able to buy a Lamborghini by now." she scolded me...

"Ma, do you drink beer?" i asked.

"Certainly not." she replied.

"Where the f*ck is your Lamborghini?"...

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#73748
Feb 4, 2013
 

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Wikipedia:

There are generally considered to be three outstanding problems with the Big Bang theory: the horizon problem, the flatness problem, and the magnetic monopole problem.

Horizon problem
The horizon problem results from the premise that information cannot travel faster than light. In a Universe of finite age, this sets a limit—the particle horizon—on the separation of any two regions of space that are in causal contact. The observed isotropy of the CMB is problematic in this regard: if the Universe had been dominated by radiation or matter at all times up to the epoch of last scattering, the particle horizon at that time would correspond to about 2 degrees on the sky. There would then be no mechanism to cause wider regions to have the same temperature.

A resolution to this apparent inconsistency is offered by inflationary theory in which a homogeneous and isotropic scalar energy field dominates the Universe at some very early period. During inflation, the Universe undergoes exponential expansion, and the particle horizon expands much more rapidly than previously assumed. The observed isotropy of the CMB then follows from the fact that this larger region was in causal contact before the beginning of inflation.

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle predicts that during the inflationary phase there would be quantum thermal fluctuations, which would be magnified to cosmic scale. These fluctuations serve as the seeds of all current structure in the Universe. Inflation predicts that the primordial fluctuations are nearly scale invariant and Gaussian, which has been accurately confirmed by measurements of the CMB. If inflation occurred, exponential expansion would push large regions of space well beyond our observable horizon.

Flatness problem
The overall geometry of the Universe is determined by whether the Omega cosmological parameter is less than, equal to or greater than 1. Shown from top to bottom are a closed Universe with positive curvature, a hyperbolic Universe with negative curvature and aflat Universe with zero curvature.
The flatness problem is an observational problem associated with a Friedmann–Lemaître–Robert son–Walker metric. The Universe may have positive, negative, or zero spatial curvature depending on its total energy density. Curvature is negative if its density is less than the critical density, positive if greater, and zero at the critical density, in which case space is said to beflat. The problem is that any small departure from the critical density grows with time, and yet the Universe today remains very close to flat. Given that a natural timescale for departure from flatness might be the Planck time, 10^43 seconds the fact that the Universe has reached neither a heat death nor a Big Crunch after billions of years requires some explanation. For instance, even at the relatively late age of a few minutes (the time of nucleosynthesis), the Universe density must have been within one part in 10^14 of its critical value, or it would not exist as it does today.

A resolution to this problem is offered by inflationary theory. During the inflationary period, spacetime expanded to such an extent that its curvature would have been smoothed out. Thus, it is theorized that inflation drove the Universe to a very nearly spatially flat state, with almost exactly the critical density.

Magnetic monopoles
The magnetic monopole objection was raised in the late 1970s. Grand unification theories predicted topological defects in space that would manifest as magnetic monopoles. These objects would be produced efficiently in the hot early Universe, resulting in a density much higher than is consistent with observations, given that searches have never found any monopoles. This problem is also resolved by cosmic inflation, which removes all point defects from the observable Universe in the same way that it drives the geometry to flatness.

“what we think we become”

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#73749
Feb 4, 2013
 

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01Justsayin wrote:
Crap! The Avatar was one of the few people in here I actually enjoy talking to. Oh well. Back to trash talking the atheists.
lol. they would like that.

“what we think we become”

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#73750
Feb 4, 2013
 

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MikeF wrote:
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How do you come to the conclusion that someone who doesn't see things your way finds everything vile and evil?
They know who they are. Don't need to pinpoint anyone.
ztormbringer

United States

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#73751
Feb 4, 2013
 
Kong_ wrote:
A bit off-topic, but something's fishy with this:

"Lamborghini crash kills Kissimmee woman, Winter Haven man.

Tiffany Beene was treasurer of a Christian non-profit."

(Yes...Tiffany owned the Lamborghini)

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/bre...

Apparently there's good money in Christian non-profits.
There is, the mafia and drug cartels recognized this about 20-25 years ago and jumped on the gravy train. Dig deep enough into non-profit structures and you'll run across their spore. From no-bid purchasing for building materials , to funny bookkeeping it's all there if anyone want's to look. Often the excuse given when caught is they were doing "good" with "dirty" money. Um, that's money laundering.

“what we think we become”

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#73752
Feb 4, 2013
 

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The Dude wrote:
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That's nice. Now explain how that helps in predicting the positions of astronomical phenomena.
Why don't you ask a Scientist who might have the answers.

After sleeping through a hundred million centuries we have finally opened our eyes on a sumptuous planet, sparkling with color, bountiful with life. Within decades we must close our eyes again. Isnt it a noble, an enlightened way of spending our brief time in the sun, to work at understanding the universe and how we have come to wake up in it? This is how I answer when I am askedas I am surprisingly oftenwhy I bother to get up in the mornings.

-Richard Dawkins

There are experts out there who know the answers but they don't know that it's only here and now. There will be no other time, not in the next lifetimes, it's now and never. To requote Einstein, "God doesn't play nice."

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Taizhou, China

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#73753
Feb 4, 2013
 

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Other respondents have spoken about the scientific signs of evolution.
I would like to speak about the psychological signs:

&#9632; When we stroke a dog or a cat, our inner brains tell us that we are inspecting a juvenile for lice. Likewise, when we stroke another human being, our inner brains tell us the same thing. Of course, we lost most of our fur long ago, but our inner brains don't know that.

&#9632; Hometown loyalty is an example. My mother grew up in Woodville, Mississippi, hometown of composer William Grant Still. My father grew up in New Albany, Mississippi, hometown of writer William Faulkner. I grew up in Anderson, Indiana, hometown of Carl Erskine, pitcher for the Dodgers.

You may say, "So what? Those are other people's accomplishments, not yours." But my inner brain tells me that we are still living in villages which declare war on each other. So I want the population of each village to be as stong as possible.

&#9632; Reaction to screen images is another example. Why do you feel afraid when a monster appears in a movie? That monster can't hurt you any more than this message on the screen can. But your inner brain tells you to react with fear to anything that looks like a wild animal.

&#9632; Hostility toward people of differing opinion is still another example. Case in point: look at how much hatred there is right here in this thread. We attack each other because our inner brains tell us that we are confronting enemies and predators.

&#9632; You want to know why people, especially men and boys, play fight so much?
And you want to know why friends tease each other?
And why do we express affection by lightly punching each other.

It's because they are rehearsing in case of an actual attack by enemies or predators.
Of course, physical fitness will be of little help to us if an enemy nation drops a bomb on us. Also, modern civilization has eliminated the danger of predators.
But our inner brains don't know that.

&#9632; R. D. Guthrie, in his book Body Hot Spots, explains smiling as a form of teasing. According to Guthrie, you smile at another person in order to show your sharp fangs, which your inner brain thinks you still have. Since you believe that you can bite the other person to death, but choose not to, the other person can interpret this as a friendship signal.

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Since: Mar 12

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#73754
Feb 5, 2013
 

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Cybele wrote:
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Here's more:
"The entirety of atheism is contained in this response. Atheism is not a philosophy; it is not even a view of the world; it is simply a refusal to deny the obvious. Unfortunately, we live in a world in which the obvious is overlooked as a matter of principle. The obvious must be observed and re-observed and argued for. This is a thankless job. It carries with it an aura of petulance and insensitivity. It is, moreover, a job that the atheist does not want."
READ THE LAST LINE. Apparently, he is willing to admit that an atheist does not and would not want to have an explanation for God. By stating something like "deny the obvious" he's acknowledging that perhaps the concept of a God is what many thinks is the 'obvious' and that he evidently states that it should be 'observed' and 're-observed.'
I read his book The End of Faith. And most of his criticisms are against Islam religion. And people say he's a closet Buddhist. Go figure.
Looks to me like you have completely misunderstood Sam Harris. His use of the double negative did not help.

He is saying that to him at least, it is obvious there is no God.

And Buddhism does not require any belief in God or gods either, BTW.

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