Man committed suicide because a crow ...

Man committed suicide because a crow sat on his head

There are 63 comments on the Anorak story from Jul 22, 2013, titled Man committed suicide because a crow sat on his head. In it, Anorak reports that:

"I AM waiting for the post-mortem report, but even I think he took the extreme step due to the crow incident.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Anorak.

“Happiness comes through giving”

Level 7

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#43 Jul 23, 2013
Deer Whisperer wrote:
<quoted text>
Crow Vadis?
Counting Crows ... a big fan of this debut album:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_and_Every...
"Round Here","Mr. Jones","Rain King","A Murder of One"
Ah, the Minneapolis Crows. Or Sheryl Crow? Counting Crows? Stone the Crows? Their all worth raven about, but Leona Anderson is the Old Crow, with or without the bourbon.
be honest

Prestonsburg, KY

#44 Jul 23, 2013
Hoosier Hillbilly wrote:
It’s natural to take notice of the fact that the crow has been regarded throughout history in a mysterious and sometimes ominous way. Perhaps more than any other animal, save the bat or the black cat, the crow and raven have been generally depicted in dark situations in both literature and film. Who doesn’t visualize a raven when they think of macabre writings of Edgar Allan Poe and his preoccupation with omens of death? And who can forget the playground scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds”? And just about every movie with a creepy graveyard or haunted mansion, the eerie calling of crows can be heard in the background. Lets face it, they never got the good press of the eagle, the duck or even the lowly pigeon. Maybe they just had a bad publicist!
Yes, crows have been historically associated with death in a very personal way. Add to that the crow’s innate intelligence, and it’s natural that we should have elevated the common crow to a mythological level above and beyond that of a normal bird. So here are some examples of superstitions and folklore that have lasted the test of time. Silly and out of date? Probably. But then maybe you haven’t walked through a dark graveyard lately.
•Crows have been used for the purpose of divination since the time of ancient Rome.
•Finding a dead crow on the road is good luck.
•Crows in a church yard are bad luck.
•A single crow over a house meant bad news, and often foretold a death within. "A crow on the thatch, soon death lifts the latch."
•It was unlucky in Wales to have a crow cross your path. However, if two crows crossed your path, the luck was reversed. "Two crows I see, good luck to me" .
•In New England, however, to see two crows flying together from the left was bad luck.
•When crows were quiet during their midsummer's molt, some European peasants believed that it was because they were preparing to go to the Devil to pay tribute with their black feathers.
•Often, two crows would be released together during a wedding celebration. If the two flew away together, the couple could look forward to a long life together. If the pair separated, the couple might expect to be soon parted.
•In Somerset (West Country of England) locals used to carry an onion with them for protection from magpies or crows.
•The French had a saying that evil priests became crows, and bad nuns became magpies.
•The Greeks said "Go to the Crows" the same way we would say "Go to Hell."
•The Romans used the expression "To pierce a Crow's eye" in relation to something that was almost impossible to do.
•An Irish expression, "You'll follow the Crows for it" meant that a person would miss something after it was gone.
•The expression, "I have a bone to pick with you" used to be " I have a crow to pick with you".
Wow this is impressive.

“Happiness comes through giving”

Level 7

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#45 Jul 23, 2013
Hoosier Hillbilly wrote:
It’s natural to take notice of the fact that the crow has been regarded throughout history in a mysterious and sometimes ominous way. Perhaps more than any other animal, save the bat or the black cat, the crow and raven have been generally depicted in dark situations in both literature and film. Who doesn’t visualize a raven when they think of macabre writings of Edgar Allan Poe and his preoccupation with omens of death? And who can forget the playground scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds”? And just about every movie with a creepy graveyard or haunted mansion, the eerie calling of crows can be heard in the background. Lets face it, they never got the good press of the eagle, the duck or even the lowly pigeon. Maybe they just had a bad publicist!
Yes, crows have been historically associated with death in a very personal way. Add to that the crow’s innate intelligence, and it’s natural that we should have elevated the common crow to a mythological level above and beyond that of a normal bird. So here are some examples of superstitions and folklore that have lasted the test of time. Silly and out of date? Probably. But then maybe you haven’t walked through a dark graveyard lately.
•Crows have been used for the purpose of divination since the time of ancient Rome.
•Finding a dead crow on the road is good luck.
•Crows in a church yard are bad luck.
•A single crow over a house meant bad news, and often foretold a death within. "A crow on the thatch, soon death lifts the latch."
•It was unlucky in Wales to have a crow cross your path. However, if two crows crossed your path, the luck was reversed. "Two crows I see, good luck to me" .
•In New England, however, to see two crows flying together from the left was bad luck.
•When crows were quiet during their midsummer's molt, some European peasants believed that it was because they were preparing to go to the Devil to pay tribute with their black feathers.
•Often, two crows would be released together during a wedding celebration. If the two flew away together, the couple could look forward to a long life together. If the pair separated, the couple might expect to be soon parted.
•In Somerset (West Country of England) locals used to carry an onion with them for protection from magpies or crows.
•The French had a saying that evil priests became crows, and bad nuns became magpies.
•The Greeks said "Go to the Crows" the same way we would say "Go to Hell."
•The Romans used the expression "To pierce a Crow's eye" in relation to something that was almost impossible to do.
•An Irish expression, "You'll follow the Crows for it" meant that a person would miss something after it was gone.
•The expression, "I have a bone to pick with you" used to be " I have a crow to pick with you".
Good stuff. If I disagreed, I'd have to eat crow.
Rambeaux

Allentown, PA

#46 Jul 23, 2013
Whew! For a moment I thought it might have been Johnny Depp in his portrayal of Tonto. Good thing I read the story.

Level 9

Since: Nov 10

Powellton WV

#47 Jul 23, 2013
Deer Whisperer wrote:
<quoted text>
And add wolves and snakes to the critters that folklore and myths put a burden on, in a big way.
I remember a farmer checking crop seed germination would say "he's playin' crow".
And you know, crows are very intelligent birds. It's been shown that they can remember a face for at least two years ... stalkers they might be! Maybe that ability is the basis for some the sayings listed ?!
http://docuwiki.net/index.php... (PBS)#Informationtitle=A_Murde r_of_Crows_(PBS)#Information
The wolves no doubt.
All of the "big bad wolf" stories were out there
to make these animals 'evil' and make it OK to kill
them to the point of extinction.

And sparrows.
We were always told sparrows were the harbingers of death.

“Happiness comes through giving”

Level 7

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#48 Jul 23, 2013
arctic wrote:
<quoted text>
The wolves no doubt.
All of the "big bad wolf" stories were out there
to make these animals 'evil' and make it OK to kill
them to the point of extinction.
And sparrows.
We were always told sparrows were the harbingers of death.
Sparrows resting from their midday flight
Upon my windowsill alight,
Quake and tremble in their fright,
That they'll be taken in the night.

Level 9

Since: Nov 10

Powellton WV

#49 Jul 23, 2013
Lawrence Wolf wrote:
<quoted text>
Sparrows resting from their midday flight
Upon my windowsill alight,
Quake and tremble in their fright,
That they'll be taken in the night.
Howling high on a mountain top,
Sending shivers up my spine,
Stands a lonely sentinel,
Calling to others of his kind.

The last of a vanishing breed.
His crime--the need to eat.
His mate has a liter waiting,
For dad to bring home some meat.

The ranchers say he's a threat,
To the little ones in their herd.
But to hunt him to extinction
is meaningless and absurd.

“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#50 Jul 23, 2013
Some people think ravens are bad omens, but this is taking that too far.

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#51 Jul 24, 2013
JM_Brazil wrote:
Crows sit?
According to Tonto they do...

http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_y...

“Don't harsh my mellow, man!”

Level 8

Since: Aug 08

Great State of Oklahoma!

#53 Jul 24, 2013
-_Yernogood- wrote:
You know if I killed myself every time a crow sat on my hand...
Hey you!! Long time, no see!

“I care more about my character”

Level 7

Since: Jun 11

...... then my reputation

#55 Jul 24, 2013
-_Yernogood- wrote:
<quoted text>
Hey there little Hippichick.
Yep it has been a real long time. How goes things?
And a new shiny account, lol.

Welcome back neighbor. Go and reek havoc!

Level 8

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#57 Jul 24, 2013
Is that how old women get crows feet in the corners of their eyes?

Level 9

Since: Nov 10

Powellton WV

#58 Jul 24, 2013
Naughtyrobot wrote:
Is that how old women get crows feet in the corners of their eyes?
Who are you calling 'old'?

“I care more about my character”

Level 7

Since: Jun 11

...... then my reputation

#59 Jul 24, 2013
arctic wrote:
<quoted text>
Who are you calling 'old'?
You can smack him for that, it's in the rule book.

Level 8

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#60 Jul 25, 2013
Beautiful Black Molly wrote:
<quoted text>
You can smack him for that, it's in the rule book.
What kind of smack? Sometimes it is difficult to tell a woman's age, but I have found that getting up close, you can tell by the lines around her eyes. Its not a turn off though...just truth in advertising issues. One lovely cougar tried to sell me 29 but was really 39, I mean we still sealed the deal, but why lie?

“Up with which, I will not put”

Since: Jul 08

Sao Paulo

#61 Jul 25, 2013
-_Yernogood- wrote:
You know if I killed myself every time a crow sat on my hand...
Dude - long time!

Reduced sentence for good behavior?

Level 6

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

#62 Jul 25, 2013
PFfff wrote:
one less idiot in the world...
What are you doing here then. You should have gone ages ago by your standards.

“Up with which, I will not put”

Since: Jul 08

Sao Paulo

#64 Jul 25, 2013
-_Yernogood- wrote:
<quoted text>Exactly. How goes the free world?
Lol, according to Edward Snowden, not so free. Good to have you back!
animalempath

Brooklyn, NY

#66 Jul 25, 2013
Excellent posts/info.Thank you
Hoosier Hillbilly wrote:
It’s natural to take notice of the fact that the crow has been regarded throughout history in a mysterious and sometimes ominous way. Perhaps more than any other animal, save the bat or the black cat, the crow and raven have been generally depicted in dark situations in both literature and film. Who doesn’t visualize a raven when they think of macabre writings of Edgar Allan Poe and his preoccupation with omens of death? And who can forget the playground scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds”? And just about every movie with a creepy graveyard or haunted mansion, the eerie calling of crows can be heard in the background. Lets face it, they never got the good press of the eagle, the duck or even the lowly pigeon. Maybe they just had a bad publicist!
Yes, crows have been historically associated with death in a very personal way. Add to that the crow’s innate intelligence, and it’s natural that we should have elevated the common crow to a mythological level above and beyond that of a normal bird. So here are some examples of superstitions and folklore that have lasted the test of time. Silly and out of date? Probably. But then maybe you haven’t walked through a dark graveyard lately.
•Crows have been used for the purpose of divination since the time of ancient Rome.
•Finding a dead crow on the road is good luck.
•Crows in a church yard are bad luck.
•A single crow over a house meant bad news, and often foretold a death within. "A crow on the thatch, soon death lifts the latch."
•It was unlucky in Wales to have a crow cross your path. However, if two crows crossed your path, the luck was reversed. "Two crows I see, good luck to me" .
•In New England, however, to see two crows flying together from the left was bad luck.
•When crows were quiet during their midsummer's molt, some European peasants believed that it was because they were preparing to go to the Devil to pay tribute with their black feathers.
•Often, two crows would be released together during a wedding celebration. If the two flew away together, the couple could look forward to a long life together. If the pair separated, the couple might expect to be soon parted.
•In Somerset (West Country of England) locals used to carry an onion with them for protection from magpies or crows.
•The French had a saying that evil priests became crows, and bad nuns became magpies.
•The Greeks said "Go to the Crows" the same way we would say "Go to Hell."
•The Romans used the expression "To pierce a Crow's eye" in relation to something that was almost impossible to do.
•An Irish expression, "You'll follow the Crows for it" meant that a person would miss something after it was gone.
•The expression, "I have a bone to pick with you" used to be " I have a crow to pick with you".

“Up with which, I will not put”

Since: Jul 08

Sao Paulo

#67 Jul 25, 2013
-_Yernogood- wrote:
<quoted text>Good ol' Eddy Snowden. What the hell was he thinking? I mean I've been dropping secrets for years but damn, you have to do it cloaked.
Right?
I want to admire the guy for what he did, but he had a good job, in Hawaii no less, pretty good salary, potentially solid future, and he goes and not only shoots himself in the foot, but makes himself an unemployable, most-wanted shit-list entry, who will need to be looking over his sholder from here on. Can't say that's so admireable. Hope he gets a good book deal.

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