Tennessee brings back electric chair

Tennessee brings back electric chair

There are 142 comments on the The Kansas City Star story from May 23, 2014, titled Tennessee brings back electric chair. In it, The Kansas City Star reports that:

Dignitaries, downtown residents and business executives gathered Thursday just south of Main Street and Truman Road for the official groundbreaking of the downtown streetcar starter route.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Kansas City Star.

Question

Arlington, TX

#23 May 23, 2014
How many innocent people must be put to death before the death penalty is abolished?

“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#24 May 23, 2014
Nitrogen (or helium) in a modified oven bag is an exit method. The reason nitrogen is used is because it is so similar to ordinary air, but without oxygen, and is used to flush out carbon dioxide. It is the CO2 that makes you feel like you are suffocating. There are special nerves in certain large vessels which detect CO2 levels and give you a sense of panic. CO2 is heavier than nitrogen and nitrogen can flush it out of the makeshift mask. Helium could be used, but it is more likely to produce a headache.

“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#25 May 23, 2014
Question wrote:
How many innocent people must be put to death before the death penalty is abolished?
Either way, innocent people will die. Plus one problem is the not-so-innocent die too. For instance, someone does an armed robbery, and someone else shoots innocent people. Of course, the law may still considered the killing as inevitably resulting from the actions of the accomplice. Or, they convict the getaway driver or other low-involvement offender because all their buddies rolled on them in court.

Then there is malicious prosecution and junk science. Snitches are always a problem. I don't mean lawful informants, but people given favors or coerced for testimony. For the right fee or enough immunity, most would say almost anything. And sometimes a person is wrongfully convicted because a snitch on another matter did the crime. For instance, a guy told me about someone stealing his checkbook and he got convicted for it instead. The one who really did it was owed a favor by a prosecutor who cooked the evidence to keep the heat off of his "friend."

“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#26 May 23, 2014
xxxooxxx wrote:
<quoted text>
not sayin' that that some atrocities dont deserve the electric chair....
They deserve instead what the 8th Amendment says is unconstitutional, but we have no right to give that, since we are supposed to be more civilized than that.

Even the Code of Hammurabi provided limits on what could be done. Those were just the maximums. Nobody was bound to actually do any of them, but the Code was there to protect bystanders, family members, and to also protect the guilty from excessive revenge (ie., if they blind you in one eye, you can't take two). It wasn't without its flaws, but it was an early attempt at ethics.

A few years back, a woman in the middle east was blinded by somebody she said no to, and initially, she was going to have him blinded too. The law allowed for that, though most considered it a symbolic mention and not something literal. The human rights people condemned this. The government would blind him in a much more humane way in that they would just put drops in his eyes, not sling a whole bottle of acid at him like he did to her. But at the last minute, she changed her mind and said that letting him sweat it out was enough for her. If I am not crossing up stories (and confusing with the woman attacked by 3 neighbors in India), she did commit suicide after that.
Christians In Name Only

Philadelphia, PA

#27 May 23, 2014
Spotted Girl wrote:
<quoted text>
Either way, innocent people will die.
No, PG, having the government not execute innocent people will reduce the number of innocent people who die.

You're twisted.
Parden Pard

Catasauqua, PA

#28 May 23, 2014
What a waste of good electricity,,,A hollow point .22 to the back of the head and done ,,shesssh,,(might be messy,but effective),,(30 cents)
roy

Owensboro, KY

#29 May 23, 2014
green mile execution scene

“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#30 May 23, 2014
Christians In Name Only wrote:
<quoted text>
No, PG, having the government not execute innocent people will reduce the number of innocent people who die.
You're twisted.
I'm SG.

If you execute less people, then you have more criminals who could escape. So lets try to look at the whole picture and try to discuss the logic or lack thereof rather than be nasty with each other. I love your puns and all.

“New & Improved..”

Level 8

Since: Oct 07

Formerly From Kenya

#31 May 23, 2014
Spotted Girl wrote:
<quoted text>
They deserve instead what the 8th Amendment says is unconstitutional, but we have no right to give that, since we are supposed to be more civilized than that.
Even the Code of Hammurabi provided limits on what could be done. Those were just the maximums. Nobody was bound to actually do any of them, but the Code was there to protect bystanders, family members, and to also protect the guilty from excessive revenge (ie., if they blind you in one eye, you can't take two). It wasn't without its flaws, but it was an early attempt at ethics.
A few years back, a woman in the middle east was blinded by somebody she said no to, and initially, she was going to have him blinded too. The law allowed for that, though most considered it a symbolic mention and not something literal. The human rights people condemned this. The government would blind him in a much more humane way in that they would just put drops in his eyes, not sling a whole bottle of acid at him like he did to her. But at the last minute, she changed her mind and said that letting him sweat it out was enough for her. If I am not crossing up stories (and confusing with the woman attacked by 3 neighbors in India), she did commit suicide after that.
You are spot on..this is that case.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13868...

I don't know about suicide though..

Since: May 14

Location hidden

#32 May 23, 2014
morbid ; (

“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#33 May 23, 2014
The person I was posting to ("Question") mentioned abolishing the death penalty. If you have it, you kill the worst of the criminals to make absolutely sure they never do it again and to send a message to society. If you don't have it, sure, you will save a few innocent people directly, but could also cause MORE innocent people to by at the hands of bad people. Just as mistakes cause the DP to kill the wrong people, mistakes can also lead to a no-parole lifer being released due to a clerical error. So what is the conclusion? Whether the state kills innocent people or murderers do, innocent people will die regardless.

Now, like everyone here, I don't want innocent people to get killed, but I believe ececution should remain as an option for the truly heinous. Lets not throw the baby out with the bathwater. So lets keep the DP and find better ways to eliminate error.

I will say one thing, even if I seem to contradict myself, and that is that there are not too many in law enforcement that I would trust with this. They seem to be red-blooded, often men who feel insecure or powerless and who now have all this authority. We see the immaturity of Topix, and the Sheriff's office in many cities has all of the same mindset. So while I don't oppose the DP, I would oppose many of the law enforcement people I know of having anything to do with those sorts of cases. They get their egos hurt and want to set up people or destroy evidence.

I know one person who claims that happened to them. Luckily that was not a capital case. But they had to deal with doctored evidence. Like how does a 4-hour interview suddenly shrink into a 1-hour interview that says things that you never said? That is one reason you should never say "yes," or "I did" while in the interview room. If they ask you if you want water, say, "I would like that," not "Yes please." And if they try to turn to small talk and ask something about an accomplishment, don't say, "I did it." You don't want to say anything that could be spliced elsewhere in the conversation.

One problem is that a lot of "error" is intentional or at the least, a reckless disregard. Intentional error is false witnesses (paid informants), framing, evidence tampering and cover-up. Reckless disregard could be bad representation (eg., lawyer disorganized and sleepy), bad jurors (half asleep, failing to take notes, biased), contaminated evidence, clerical errors, etc. And then things in the middle like exculpatory "missing" evidence.
roy

Owensboro, KY

#34 May 23, 2014
I guess if you kill somebody the only fitting punishment is death. Not talking about self defense there are laws that cover self defense.

On the other hand, a lot of people on death row have been exonerated on dna evidence. A lot. Capital punishment also seems to only applies to poor folk and minorities. A millionaire who murders somebody in cold blood for money never gets the death penalty. So I guess if the state can't do it right, don't do it.
roy

Owensboro, KY

#35 May 23, 2014
Green Mile's Botched Execution

http://www.bing.com/videos/search...
roy

Owensboro, KY

#36 May 23, 2014
After 75 years, last public hanging haunts city

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/08/12/after-75...
Rap Citi

United States

#37 May 23, 2014
Parden Pard wrote:
What a waste of good electricity,,,A hollow point .22 to the back of the head and done ,,shesssh,,(might be messy,but effective),,(30 cents)
Please tell me where I can buy .22 hollow points for 30 cents per round.
Christians In Name Only

Philadelphia, PA

#38 May 23, 2014
Spotted Girl wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm SG.
If you execute less people, then you have more criminals who could escape. So lets try to look at the whole picture and try to discuss the logic or lack thereof rather than be nasty with each other. I love your puns and all.
1. Same diff.

2. We don't have people on death row escaping. Not even people serving life. These are freak occurrences. Even when they do happen they do not necessarily or often result in the escapee killing more people.(Now, when it does happen it's an outrage.)

I happen to think along with the Innocence Project that not only are a lot of people convicted wrongly of various crimes, but that quite a substantial number of innocent people have wrongly wound up on death row or have been wrongly executed.

Eliminating the death penalty in recognition of human fallibility in bureaucracies doesn't create more murders in any numbers. But even if it did the notion of our very powerful government officially executing innocent parties is more offensive in the long term than some rogue, lawless fugitive murdering someone. It's about disparities of power...in addition to the statistical aspects of the numbers of deaths.

Of course I understand the right wing is not concerned about this most awesome, irretractable instance of government power - to execute.
Christians In Name Only

Philadelphia, PA

#39 May 23, 2014
Rap Citi wrote:
<quoted text>
Please tell me where I can buy .22 hollow points for 30 cents per round.
The Chinese import ones, but be advised they contain dangerous amounts of lead....
Christians In Name Only

Philadelphia, PA

#40 May 23, 2014
Spotted Girl wrote:
<quoted text>
I love your puns and all.
BTW, you are _really_ gonna be criticized for _that_ opinion.
Independent

United States

#41 May 23, 2014
roy wrote:
On the other hand, a lot of people on death row have been exonerated on dna evidence. A lot.
According to the Innocence Project website,

"• There have been 316 post-conviction DNA exonerations in the United States.

• 18 of the 316 people exonerated through DNA served time on death row."

18 is hardly " a lot"
Christians In Name Only

Philadelphia, PA

#42 May 23, 2014
Independent wrote:
<quoted text>
According to the Innocence Project website,
"• There have been 316 post-conviction DNA exonerations in the United States.
• 18 of the 316 people exonerated through DNA served time on death row."
18 is hardly " a lot"
As you would know if you were not so attached to dissembling, the Innocence Project (and other similar groups) have only been able to analyze a small percentage of death penalty convictions. This is due to money and other resources, who will allow them to test, the fact that DNA is relatively recent and thus unavailable for the vast majority of death penalty cases.

What we're finding is a high _percentage_ of errors in convictions of all kinds, including with the death penalty cases you allude to.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Weird Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
2015: "Make a Story/ 6 Words Only: (Apr '15) 2 min beatlesinthebog 6,924
Word Association. (Nov '10) 4 min This is Sweet 19,207
News Students seeking sugar daddies for tuition, ren... 4 min White guilt 7
One Word (Jan '09) 5 min Mega Monster 16,283
Answer a question with a question (Apr '15) 6 min beatlesinthebog 2,627
Last Post Wins! (Aug '08) 8 min beatlesinthebog 145,410
Word Association (Mar '10) 15 min Mega Monster 20,398
What song are you listening to right now? (Apr '08) 1 hr CJ Rocker 192,797
El's Kitchen (Feb '09) 1 hr By The Seashore 56,822
News Man arrested after 'putting his PENIS on superm... 2 hr Rev Cash Dollar 24
Crystal_Clears Kitchen (Refurbished) 3 hr sounds average to me 7,200
True False Game (Jun '11) 7 hr andet1987 12,397
More from around the web