Hidden New York: fake Brooklyn browns...

Hidden New York: fake Brooklyn brownstone

Posted in the Weird Forum

Anonymous

Sharon Springs, NY

#1 Feb 3, 2014
If you take a stroll through Brooklyn Heights, be sure to pause in front of 58 Joralemon Street, near Willow Place. It appears to be a normal brownstone, but after a more careful look at the three-story building, you’ll notice blacked-out windows. It’s actually an emergency subway exit and ventilator, situated along the 4 and 5 train tunnels. Peer through the cracks of the front door, and you’ll see what looks like a subway platform. A similar substation exists behind the walls of 108 East 19th Street, near Irving Place; it can be found behind a large set of garage doors.
I didn't know about the Irving place one, but the brooklyn heights one I did. I think they have one that looks like a Victorian house, in London, England.
Level 5

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#2 Feb 3, 2014
I love Brownstone's!
Islander

United States

#3 Feb 3, 2014
I never got the whole Brownstone thing.They look nice but the idea of buying a house that shares a wall with another persons house always seemed ridiculous to me. Especially considering the large price tag they hold. Who owns the wall? Not to mention if one catches on fire yours is in danger too. Compounded with the fact of shared infestations. Just can't grasp the allure of such a faulty layout. No separation of your house from the ones next to yours. Not to mention no yard.
Anonymous

Sharon Springs, NY

#4 Feb 3, 2014
Islander wrote:
I never got the whole Brownstone thing.They look nice but the idea of buying a house that shares a wall with another persons house always seemed ridiculous to me. Especially considering the large price tag they hold. Who owns the wall? Not to mention if one catches on fire yours is in danger too. Compounded with the fact of shared infestations. Just can't grasp the allure of such a faulty layout. No separation of your house from the ones next to yours. Not to mention no yard.
I've seen brownstones with yards. Yes, they might be expensive in the neighborhood they are built in, but if its in a really awful neighborhood, they are cheap. I'm sure it's more location than the fact that the house is a brownstone.
Anonymous

Sharon Springs, NY

#5 Feb 3, 2014
Spirit67_ wrote:
I love Brownstone's!
I remember seeing this brownstone in Brooklyn, it has moss growing up the front façade, but I think it added a nice touch...like it gave the house a personality. It might be hard to take care of though, because eventually the moss would cover the windows, and you have to chop it off.
Left turn at Albuquerque

United States

#6 Feb 3, 2014
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text>
I've seen brownstones with yards. Yes, they might be expensive in the neighborhood they are built in, but if its in a really awful neighborhood, they are cheap. I'm sure it's more location than the fact that the house is a brownstone.
Yards huh, that sounds better, but are they just the postage stamps you can weed wack the whole lawn and is only big enough to sit next to your dog while he takes a dump? Anyways I can never wrap my head around owning a house that is connected to the houses next to them. Seems crazy to me. Really no different than living in a large apartment. Just me. Just like in my hometown some of the older houses in older areas are literally 2 feet close to each other. Never understood why someone would want to have their windows that close to another's. You got to walk on eggshells in your own home as to not disturb the neighbor. Bad enough when you rent but dong so in a home you paid a lot of money for and own? Just don't get the draw. Again, that's me.
Anonymous

Sharon Springs, NY

#8 Feb 3, 2014
Marysville Ohio wrote:
<quoted text>I think you are unclear of the concept of stone NOT being flammable.
But the inner walls that separate the two houses are usually made of wood, so a fire could spread through the row, instead of out one, onto the others. It just rages inside instead of out.
Islander

United States

#9 Feb 3, 2014
Marysville Ohio wrote:
<quoted text>I think you are unclear of the concept of stone NOT being flammable.
Silly person. Stone buildings still catch fire. The rafters and the guts and the roofs are still made out of flammable material. The fire can still spread. Fire also damages the mortar and can even spread through a stone wall as wood beams are often built into and through the stone wall. Especially on older buildings built with little or no fire safty in the building plan. A stone wall is not going to stop the spreed of fire. Go talk to building inspector, homebuilder, or fireman.
Islander

United States

#10 Feb 3, 2014
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text>
But the inner walls that separate the two houses are usually made of wood, so a fire could spread through the row, instead of out one, onto the others. It just rages inside instead of out.
So tell me. How is the repair of the shared wall handled? This is what I don't get. Who is responsible for it? If I do my part on my side to maintain it but the neighbor doesn't and mine suffers damage, how is that handled? Any idea about the specifics?
Anonymous

Sharon Springs, NY

#11 Feb 3, 2014
Islander wrote:
<quoted text>So tell me. How is the repair of the shared wall handled? This is what I don't get. Who is responsible for it? If I do my part on my side to maintain it but the neighbor doesn't and mine suffers damage, how is that handled? Any idea about the specifics?
I've never lived in a brownstone. I'm guessing whoever actually owns the side of the wall that is damaged repairs it. But if it is a rented brownstone, whatever side that suffers damage is repaired at the cost of the landowner.
Level 5

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#12 Feb 3, 2014
Anonymous wrote:
<quoted text>
I remember seeing this brownstone in Brooklyn, it has moss growing up the front façade, but I think it added a nice touch...like it gave the house a personality. It might be hard to take care of though, because eventually the moss would cover the windows, and you have to chop it off.
I don't think I would like the moss thing! Ivy, maybe!
Islander

United States

#13 Feb 3, 2014
Spirit67_ wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't think I would like the moss thing! Ivy, maybe!
The ivy looks nice but it causes problems. It encourages mold and insects for one. It also isn't good for the mortar.
Tsk Tsk

Jackson, MO

#14 Feb 3, 2014

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