Man sleeps for 10 hours unaware of kn...

Man sleeps for 10 hours unaware of knife stuck in his back

There are 52 comments on the WFTV Orlando story from Dec 10, 2013, titled Man sleeps for 10 hours unaware of knife stuck in his back. In it, WFTV Orlando reports that:

A New Jersey man is apparently is a very sound sleeper, or has a very high tolerance for pain.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WFTV Orlando.

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“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#42 Dec 11, 2013
Grace Nerissa wrote:
<quoted text>
From what you wrote, it seems it's all cloak & *dagger* stuff:)
Not sure of a cloak, but certainly about daggers.

So many call their friends backstabbers, but few literally are. That was probably Caesar who coined that term, or at least someone referencing Julius Caesar. "And you too, Brutus?" His wife had a bad dream about him going out, and he should have listened to her. Everyone wanted to kill him, and a good number of people there did.

“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#43 Dec 11, 2013
Aussie Tez wrote:
Poor Bloke , by the way" Republican or Democrat ?
I imagine the attacker was a Democrat because they like to "stick it to the man." And he is likely a Democrat too, since more of them openly admit to being penetrated by other men.
60s chic

Bethlehem, PA

#44 Dec 11, 2013
Spotted Girl wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, the surgery on Joni was back in the late 60s or early 70s. I guess he removed part of the hip joints or around there so they wouldn't protrude. That would likely mean she could never walk again, but she was already paralyzed, and the goal of the surgery was to improve quality of life. She would be unable to feel discomfort there or flip over to give part of her body a break from the pressure, so that meant she could get bed sores in certain place. The surgeon removed part of the bones to distribute the pressure more evenly when lying on them.
Speaking of surgery, there was an episode of The Swan. You might not care for cosmetic surgery and competitions on the basis, but sometimes, the surgeries provide a practical benefit or help doctors find a serious problem. This one woman participated after having lost her husband to cancer. She didn't like her nose or her teeth. She didn't like one hump on her nose, and there was something that seemed to appear over time that she didn't care for either. She the surgeon makes the first incision to get in to smooth out the bone, when he found tissue in there that didn't seem right or like it belonged. He did the responsible thing - he took a sample for biopsy, closed up and aborted surgery. She was disappointed at this minor setback. Then they told her the news. That thing growing on the side of her nose was basal cell carcinoma. It isn't an aggressive cancer, but they still would want to get it all. Now because of this, the surgeon had to take more tissue than would have created the optimal cosmetic result, but he apparently got all of it out and did the best he could on the rest. She didn't win the competition part, but she walked away with a better appearance, less weight, less inner demons, and a healthier view of herself.
As for the guy with the knife in the back, it is possible like you said that nerves got cut. Immediately after the initial pain of such a trauma, the area would be very numb for the first few days. The other phenomena that doctors talk about come later, as healing begins, and the brain tries to make sense of the missing inputs. So that part of the brain may grow new neurons to try to compensate, but in doing so, the patient may feel things that are not there or have involuntary twitching in the affected area.
Very interesting, SG, and thank you. It's good to know that woman had some relief in her remaining years. I have read about so many heartbreaking stories of people with anomalies, defects, diseases and injuries. "The Elephant Man" is one such story. Of course in those days, nothing much could be done for a person with this disease, except to make him/her as comfortable as possible. With so many ailments and diseases, it's a wonder that man has survived as long as he has.
60s chic

Bethlehem, PA

#45 Dec 11, 2013
Hmmm...with all this discussion about back stabbing and knives; I'm still wondering who the real Jack the Ripper could have been. From butcher to surgeon, they still don't know the true identity of the Ripper. Although "Jack the Ripper" is frightening enough, the scariest story is one that happened 25 years ago in my town. A 16 year old newspaper delivery girl was out on her route one cold dark early morning and was abducted, raped and murdered. Her body was later found in a nearby wooded area covered with leaves. She had been stabbed over 30 times. It was the most horrific and tragic story in 50 years. It was the city's first serial killer and they had finally captured him after he had murdered 2 other women. His lawyer is trying to get his sentence reduced which was at first the death penalty, then it was reduced to life without parole. I pray they don't let this psycho out on some technicality. That would be an injustice to the victims and a danger to society. Serial killers can't be cured. I hope and pray this man is never released. Enough about knives for me.

Since: Aug 08

Ashburn, VA

#46 Dec 11, 2013
... shoulder blade ...
West Coast Boss

Salinas, CA

#47 Dec 11, 2013
Snap , don't you hate when that happens?

“Hippie Single DAD, vet, Honest”

Level 6

Since: Apr 11

Steamboat Sprgs Colorado

#48 Dec 11, 2013
Spotted Girl wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, the surgery on Joni was back in the late 60s or early 70s. I guess he removed part of the hip joints or around there so they wouldn't protrude. That would likely mean she could never walk again, but she was already paralyzed, and the goal of the surgery was to improve quality of life. She would be unable to feel discomfort there or flip over to give part of her body a break from the pressure, so that meant she could get bed sores in certain place. The surgeon removed part of the bones to distribute the pressure more evenly when lying on them.
Speaking of surgery, there was an episode of The Swan. You might not care for cosmetic surgery and competitions on the basis, but sometimes, the surgeries provide a practical benefit or help doctors find a serious problem. This one woman participated after having lost her husband to cancer. She didn't like her nose or her teeth. She didn't like one hump on her nose, and there was something that seemed to appear over time that she didn't care for either. She the surgeon makes the first incision to get in to smooth out the bone, when he found tissue in there that didn't seem right or like it belonged. He did the responsible thing - he took a sample for biopsy, closed up and aborted surgery. She was disappointed at this minor setback. Then they told her the news. That thing growing on the side of her nose was basal cell carcinoma. It isn't an aggressive cancer, but they still would want to get it all. Now because of this, the surgeon had to take more tissue than would have created the optimal cosmetic result, but he apparently got all of it out and did the best he could on the rest. She didn't win the competition part, but she walked away with a better appearance, less weight, less inner demons, and a healthier view of herself.
As for the guy with the knife in the back, it is possible like you said that nerves got cut. Immediately after the initial pain of such a trauma, the area would be very numb for the first few days. The other phenomena that doctors talk about come later, as healing begins, and the brain tries to make sense of the missing inputs. So that part of the brain may grow new neurons to try to compensate, but in doing so, the patient may feel things that are not there or have involuntary twitching in the affected area.
Interesting talk from both of you! MANY neurological problems can effect those nerves or neurons as both of you seem to understand. Yes a very complex ,yet small world with them & as she pointed out one that is constantly "self healing" or adapting & in short stubborn & surviving.

I have always had a very high thresh hold for pain,not just in a tuff guy way ,but in more I see now(hindsight :)) a stupid way.
I now know a lot more about my body,mind,self & see it as a link that has always been with me.
I go through a serious nerve change fairly regularly & have for the past 20 yrs. more in the last 5 than before though.
With a condition known as "Todd's paralysis"
There are many explanations of it,but really not much is known
In short it means the nerves controlling certain functions are left useless,much like a stroke patient, BUT the nerves correct themselves or become active again, & all function comes back.
I lol it off a lot but it is serious. I don't even always report it now either. it leaves me almost completely immune to most topical pain though. Rick
http://www.healthline.com/galecontent/todds-p...

“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#49 Dec 11, 2013
60s chic wrote:
<quoted text>
Very interesting, SG, and thank you. It's good to know that woman had some relief in her remaining years. I have read about so many heartbreaking stories of people with anomalies, defects, diseases and injuries. "The Elephant Man" is one such story. Of course in those days, nothing much could be done for a person with this disease, except to make him/her as comfortable as possible. With so many ailments and diseases, it's a wonder that man has survived as long as he has.
You are welcome. Yes, I remember that story. It was based on a true story. At first, the doctor wanted to exploit his condition, and his wife talked some sense into him. Over time, the doctor did begin to respect him as a human. And Mr. Merrick only had one wish, and that was to be able to sleep normally like a little child and not have to prop his head in some weird position. He finally decided to try that, knowing full well what would happen to him next. The official COD was "accidental asphyxiation."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Merrick

And as for the real life Doctor Treves who was portrayed in the book, he had both success and setbacks in his life. He was the authority on treating appendicitis in his day. And there was a cruel, ironic twist to that. At least in the end of the book, this part is listed. While he was abroad treating one child's appendicitis, his own daughter was dying of it back home. Today, that would not have happened. Nearly any surgeon can treat appendicitis these days, and if that were not the case, inventions such as jets and cell phones would have bought more treatment time. But in Wikipedia, there is no mention of him losing a child to appendicitis, but it does suggest that he died of it. Either way, a cruel twist of fate.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Frederick_T...

You are right, in terms of neurofibromatosis, palliative care is all you can really provide. It is a dominant gene that causes this, so if you have it, there is usually a 50% chance that any offspring can get it (assuming they have a healthy copy of the gene, if not, then 100% odds).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurofibromatos...

Since: Aug 08

Ashburn, VA

#50 Dec 12, 2013
... former member of the o'jays turns self in after a lifetime of lookin over his shoulder ...
.'
The Man

Medford, NY

#51 Dec 12, 2013
He slept for more than 10 hours?
I wish I could sleep that long, period.
After about 7 hours my back FEELS like it's been stabbed, so I get out of bed all tired and stuff.

Oh well.

“The Spotted Girl News Network”

Level 8

Since: Apr 09

Spotted World

#52 Dec 12, 2013
wichita-rick wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting talk from both of you! MANY neurological problems can effect those nerves or neurons as both of you seem to understand. Yes a very complex ,yet small world with them & as she pointed out one that is constantly "self healing" or adapting & in short stubborn & surviving.
I have always had a very high thresh hold for pain,not just in a tuff guy way ,but in more I see now(hindsight :)) a stupid way.
I now know a lot more about my body,mind,self & see it as a link that has always been with me.
I go through a serious nerve change fairly regularly & have for the past 20 yrs. more in the last 5 than before though.
With a condition known as "Todd's paralysis"
There are many explanations of it,but really not much is known
In short it means the nerves controlling certain functions are left useless,much like a stroke patient, BUT the nerves correct themselves or become active again, & all function comes back.
I lol it off a lot but it is serious. I don't even always report it now either. it leaves me almost completely immune to most topical pain though. Rick
http://www.healthline.com/galecontent/todds-p...
Do you have seizures? According to Wikipedia, Todd's Paralysis (or Paresis) comes from seizures.

“Hippie Single DAD, vet, Honest”

Level 6

Since: Apr 11

Steamboat Sprgs Colorado

#53 Dec 12, 2013
Spotted Girl wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you have seizures? According to Wikipedia, Todd's Paralysis (or Paresis) comes from seizures.
Yes I do & like many other neuro problems most of the simpler definitions are a kind of blanket statement so everything ,even the unknown is covered.
Very little research is done though & even that "condition" isn't known ,even by the people who have it. I talk to others ,pretty regularly with similar conditions & we all seem to offer something slightly different than the others & with so much being the same,but different,it actually makes it quite fascinating.
On topic,the receptors that control pain are fairly easy to find, BUT when doing surgery it is such a small area,the chances for a mistake are increased in no's similar to the lottery is how my neurologist refers to it.
Yes with the seizures I have there is also no clear line as to when this may happen or how long the recovery is,the times that the general info. refer to are VERY vague & almost nothing will say it can last longer than 48 hrs., that is not 100% accurate & if the person has more seizures while in postictal stage(recovery) it may prolong & even change it again.
Meaning one day all feeling is gone from left side, then after another seizure it can ,& in my case often does switch sides ,either leaving totally or even leaving both sides,right & left partially numb & almost incapable of feeling anything.Rick

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