unanswerable question??
First Prev
of 7
Next Last

“Whip it, whip it good”

Level 8

Since: Feb 13

Location hidden

#125 Jun 19, 2013
If love and faith are the answers to all the worlds woes....why is hate and ridicule used so much?

“....VETS”

Level 9

Since: Jan 08

WELCOME HOME

#126 Jun 19, 2013
MissStress wrote:
If love and faith are the answers to all the worlds woes....why is hate and ridicule used so much?
equal rights and the and ACLU

“My Bad! Just hold me. ”

Level 9

Since: Aug 07

Orion's Belt

#127 Jun 19, 2013
Why?

“come say hi,”

Since: May 13

UK

#128 Jun 19, 2013
MissStress wrote:
If love and faith are the answers to all the worlds woes....why is hate and ridicule used so much?
Why do men have nipples?

“....VETS”

Level 9

Since: Jan 08

WELCOME HOME

#129 Jun 19, 2013
to mark the spot for the [silly cone]
Level 4

Since: Feb 13

Location hidden

#130 Jun 28, 2013
What weighs more a snowflake or a raindrop?

“My Bad! Just hold me. ”

Level 9

Since: Aug 07

Orion's Belt

#131 Jun 28, 2013
__Quintessence__ wrote:
What weighs more a snowflake or a raindrop?
Would be the same. As a snowflake becomes a raindrop.

Oh yeah, my unanswerable question.

Where and or what is the missing link? Or is there one at all.

Level 6

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#132 Jun 29, 2013
DC tells it like it is wrote:
<quoted text>
Would be the same. As a snowflake becomes a raindrop.
Oh yeah, my unanswerable question.
Where and or what is the missing link? Or is there one at all.
Would be the same if it were the same but what if you split the street, snowfall on one side and rainfall on the other?

And as to the missing link, even evolutionists can't all agree even on something like orphan genes.

“My Bad! Just hold me. ”

Level 9

Since: Aug 07

Orion's Belt

#133 Jun 29, 2013
QuiteCrazy wrote:
<quoted text>
Would be the same if it were the same but what if you split the street, snowfall on one side and rainfall on the other?
And as to the missing link, even evolutionists can't all agree even on something like orphan genes.
Someone answered the question. I see my logic was off.
Check it out:

Why Are Snowflakes Quiet and Raindrops Loud?

While looking at the snow falling outside of my window, I started wondering why rain makes a sound when it lands but snow doesn't. Why do light objects land silently (or quietly) and heavy objects make a sound when they land?
It all has to do with energy. Snow and rain land in what is called an inelastic collision. In this type of inelastic collision, almost all of the kinetic energy (the energy of motion) is converted into something else: sound energy, heat, etc. A raindrop both weighs more and is moving faster than a snowflake. Although the mass and velocity of both rain and snow has wide variations, a "typical" snowflake weighs about 3 mg and is moving at about 2 m/sec. A "typical" raindrop weighs 30 mg and is moving at 6 m/sec and so has (KE=1/2 m v2)-- nearly a hundred times the energy of a typical snowflake. More energy to convert to sound means a louder sound. In detail, the impact causes the surface (roof, car, Earth) to vibrate more, which causes the surrounding air to vibrate more, which means a louder sound.

Eric Christian
(January 2010)

http://helios.gsfc.nasa.gov/qa_gp_ev.html

Level 6

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#134 Jul 1, 2013
DC tells it like it is wrote:
<quoted text>
Someone answered the question. I see my logic was off.
Check it out:
Why Are Snowflakes Quiet and Raindrops Loud?
While looking at the snow falling outside of my window, I started wondering why rain makes a sound when it lands but snow doesn't. Why do light objects land silently (or quietly) and heavy objects make a sound when they land?
It all has to do with energy. Snow and rain land in what is called an inelastic collision. In this type of inelastic collision, almost all of the kinetic energy (the energy of motion) is converted into something else: sound energy, heat, etc. A raindrop both weighs more and is moving faster than a snowflake. Although the mass and velocity of both rain and snow has wide variations, a "typical" snowflake weighs about 3 mg and is moving at about 2 m/sec. A "typical" raindrop weighs 30 mg and is moving at 6 m/sec and so has (KE=1/2 m v2)-- nearly a hundred times the energy of a typical snowflake. More energy to convert to sound means a louder sound. In detail, the impact causes the surface (roof, car, Earth) to vibrate more, which causes the surrounding air to vibrate more, which means a louder sound.
Eric Christian
(January 2010)
http://helios.gsfc.nasa.gov/qa_gp_ev.html
OO

SoO cOol!!
TY DC

“My Bad! Just hold me. ”

Level 9

Since: Aug 07

Orion's Belt

#135 Jul 1, 2013
QuiteCrazy wrote:
<quoted text>
OO
SoO cOol!!
TY DC
You're welcome. I thought the article pretty interesting.

Now we know.

Level 7

Since: Dec 12

Location hidden

#136 Jul 1, 2013
I thought these were unanswerable questions????

LOL :)
Level 4

Since: Feb 13

Location hidden

#137 Jul 11, 2013
How are rainbows formed??
Yes refraction, but then why only in that shape? Why aren't the everywhere??

I've seen two at twice so far, why not more and often??

“I know where you are,”

Level 8

Since: Jun 08

Right here under my thumb

#138 Jul 11, 2013
__Quintessence__ wrote:
How are rainbows formed??
Yes refraction, but then why only in that shape? Why aren't the everywhere??
I've seen two at twice so far, why not more and often??
Rainbows actually form circles, positioning their center on an imaginary line that lies between your head and the sun. Each color bends, based on it's wavelength, as it passes through droplets of water. The colors do not all bend the same amount, so they appear to form a color-banded arch. You can find more information here: http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2003-04...

As for the two-rainbow phenomenom:
When conditions are suitable, a double rainbow may be seen; a larger, paler, secondary rainbow with colors reversed (red inside) outside the primary arc is caused by two refractions and two reflections of the ray while it is inside a drop.
Level 4

Since: Feb 13

Location hidden

#139 Jul 13, 2013
milwaukee69 wrote:
<quoted text>
Rainbows actually form circles, positioning their center on an imaginary line that lies between your head and the sun. Each color bends, based on it's wavelength, as it passes through droplets of water. The colors do not all bend the same amount, so they appear to form a color-banded arch. You can find more information here: http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2003-04...
As for the two-rainbow phenomenom:
When conditions are suitable, a double rainbow may be seen; a larger, paler, secondary rainbow with colors reversed (red inside) outside the primary arc is caused by two refractions and two reflections of the ray while it is inside a drop.
TY Mil! Have a great day.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 7
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Weird Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
El's Kitchen (Feb '09) 2 min Grace Nerissa 56,767
***Keep a Word~Drop a Word*** (Jan '10) 17 min _FLATLINE-------- 82,111
keep a word drop a word (Sep '12) 41 min Bezeer 13,550
Keep a Word.....Drop a Word Game (Sep '13) 44 min Bezeer 11,510
Word Association 2 (Sep '13) 45 min Bezeer 17,999
Word Association (Mar '10) 1 hr wichita-rick 20,391
2words into 2new words (May '12) 1 hr KNIGHT DeVINE 2,178
What song are you listening to right now? (Apr '08) 1 hr wichita-rick 192,750
What Turns You Off (Jun '11) 3 hr Jack 7,418
Crystal_Clears Kitchen (Refurbished) 7 hr razz58 7,192
More from around the web