Utility workers pelted with eggs fixing downed wires in Connecticut

There are 38 comments on the Examiner.com story from Nov 2, 2012, titled Utility workers pelted with eggs fixing downed wires in Connecticut. In it, Examiner.com reports that:

Utility workers were pelted with eggs and other objects as they tried to fix the power lines that were damaged during Hurricane Sandy in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

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Sheik Yerbouti

Warrington, PA

#1 Nov 3, 2012
If these ungrateful sub human savages don't want power restored let them live in the dark without food or water! The power company should put this neighborhood last on their list!
Midwestern Hillbilly

Brownstown, IL

#2 Nov 3, 2012
The ingrates could end up with longer than anticipated power outages if civility is not maintained.

From our neck of the woods, Ameren/CIPS out of St. Louis, if I recall correctly sent out FOUR HUNDRED LINEMEN in loaded utility trucks, chugging and trudging East when Sandy was still out to sea. Even a smallish REA (Rural Electrical Association Co-Op that serves people in the hinterland) scrounged together 20 workers to start truckin' East to help bring electrical order from chaos.

This joining together of forces from far and wide from many, many states across the nation, clearly shows the care and compassion people from unaffected states had for what they knew was going to hit New York and New Jersey. The linemen/women were prepared to face 18 hour days and do without creature comforts themselves, as they were on loan to some of the (it seems) unpopular big city utilities.

I read about the angry people harassing the utility workers, and predicted to the spouse "foreign" troops from unaffected states may be hauling-fanny home earlier than predicted.

New Yorkers may be used to rudity and uncivil behavior and being pelted with eggs. Utility workers from across the nation won't be. AND their bosses sitting back in smaller cities, with skeleton crews to keep their own power companies in order, may start hearing horror stories and tell their crews, "Saddle up, boys, and head on home. You're not being paid for combat duty."

There are freelance businesses, like Hinkle-McCoy, and no doubt many, who do NOTHING but travel to assist power companies in dire straits from tragedies. They might stay around - sorta like...mercenaries. There's a lineman school down in Tennessee, I believe, that trains people to populate brigades to help the locals get lights back on.

Offering to bash the teeth out of a gift horse ain't a-gonna get you where you want to go.

And BTW, yeah, it IS frustrating to see a neighbor with power, while across the street you have none. That is NOT showing favoritism. The grids are laid out in segments. So one grid segment can be up and another real close-by is not.
Embarrassed in Bpt

Trumbull, CT

#3 Nov 4, 2012
The Conn Post ran a front page story on these idiots and nowhere in the article did they condemn such nasty and agressive behavior. They made excuses for these morons saying they were frustrated with no electricity. Well guess what? EVERYONE IS FRUSTRATED but they don't behave this way. They should have broadcast the area where this took place so we could all avoid going anywhere near there. And then they wonder why Bridgeport has such a bad reputation. Duh.
CTM

Sandy Hook, CT

#4 Nov 4, 2012
Yes, it's not to smart to kill the hero that is coming to save you. But can you get just how bad the corruption problem in this state is? The workers represent the utility that is robbing us through the "legal" set-ups of Blumenthal and McKinney. Those two deserve more than eggs thrown at them. Who's next, the cable guy?
carpetbaggers

Bryn Mawr, PA

#5 Nov 4, 2012
How can these Conneticut morons think the actual on the ground in the field utility worker be making the calls on what gets fixed or not.

Most utilities have a priority list including emergency essential services, hospitals etc. Then they usually go to areas with the most problems or where one or two major fixes might restore ALOT more customers than one side of a block.

If you don't like your utility service you go to your state utility regulators, state legislatures and even federal regulators & representatives. You can even organize boycotts, stock sell offs, letter writing campaigns to corporate executives or have your municipality change providers. Also stop issuing or granting rights of ways and easements on private property-make them pay to do business on your property.

Other than heat or medical requirements if you can't survive a few days without electric shame on you.

One last thing, make sure you contact them to get a credit for days out of service. If every single customer did that after every single outage storm or not these companies would be much more responsive.

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#6 Nov 4, 2012
The cops should had been protecting these hard working people and arrest the thugs and bullies.
Midwestern Hillbilly

Brownstown, IL

#7 Nov 4, 2012
Indeed, Carpetbagger, the linemen are "boots on the ground" fixing things, comparable to grunts on the ground back in Viet Nam, as the Military Brass made decisions from The (Safe) Rear.

Out here in Flyover Country we have Smart Meters, computerised, so no one, not home-owner, nor paid company meter reader, has to wander around jotting down number readings.

The Smart Meter system allows utiity companies to fix many outages by flipping switches and tapping computer keys, to re-route power to homes by skirting areas that are the problem and sending power via a new routing (is my understanding) so they can restore service to as many people as possible, and send out a crew to get full restoration by repairing the problem area.

In the wake of Storm Sandy almost every are IS a "problem" area and damaged.

Your advice for dealing with utility services was spot on. Out here in Flyover Country there is a major utility, which REAs "feed" off. And there are some private utility companies, too, who buy power from the Big Guys but set up their own private distribution. We get regular cold calls on the telephone wanting us to switch. I'd think NY/NJ would have something comparable - maybe a well kept secret, hahahaha.

Knowing you can survive some days w/o electricity is character and confidence building. But the kicker IS that many have no SHELTER in which to do it - a really crummy game-changer making it way worse.

Dunno if there'll be any way to get credit for days w/o service. In our neck of the woods it is all metered - so if the meter isn't running since the power isn't shooting through and being used to run a household nor farm...our monthly billing automatically reflects that period of inactivity.

We were out for almost two weeks straight during that Winter Super Storm a few years ago. The wife got news of that coming our way: she did up every bit of laundry, she baked a double batch (16 loaves) of homemade bread, cooked up a storm, and prepared 24 hours ahead. We were able to give neighbors a loaf of bread and stick of margarine, gave a few neighbors firewood from our stack to use in their fireplaces to stay warm. And when the linemen drove in, she gave every guy in the worker truck a loaf of homemade bread and stick of margarine and told them to enjoy it back in their hotel room. They were thrilled. When the chips are down our Hood works together. Hopefully a silver lining in Storm Sandy is people will've made some new and lasting friends and garnered ideas so's they can batten down the hatches for the next time.

For none of us are charmed existences. And there will be crapola in our futures, IMO.
Embarrassed in Bpt

Trumbull, CT

#8 Nov 4, 2012
American Gentleman Samuel wrote:
The cops should had been protecting these hard working people and arrest the thugs and bullies.
There is no reason that the police should HAVE to protect utility workers doing their jobs. The general populace should not have to deal with those uncivilized among us. They should be prosecuted and jailed. What is this country coming to?

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#10 Nov 4, 2012
This story is about why the police should protect these hard working workers and take these thugs and bullies to jail.
Common Cents

Rochester, NY

#11 Nov 4, 2012
Were these egg throwers the same people who spit on returning Viet Nam Vets at the airports?
Citizen44

Bridgeport, CT

#12 Nov 4, 2012
Which neighborhood did this happen in? I didn't see that in the article.

Since: Jul 12

Location hidden

#13 Nov 4, 2012
Read it again and again, until you understand the story, Citizen.
carpetbaggers

Bryn Mawr, PA

#14 Nov 4, 2012
I will say onething on the utilities behalf and that is many customers with a tree on their property that is threatening aireal utility cables/wires complain, argue and/or contest FREE tree trimming by the utilities. Some communities or cities make you get a permit to cut down a tree.

In other words many that are complaining about the lack of power now are probably many of the same crowd that protests the little routine tree trimming and removal many utilities do.

This makes the utilities gun shy including a less thorough job of trimming meaning the same tree will be threatening the same line just a few years later.

Still no excuse for a painfully slow repair process or lack of communication.

“'never'”

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#15 Nov 5, 2012
carpetbaggers wrote:
I will say onething on the utilities behalf and that is many customers with a tree on their property that is threatening aireal utility cables/wires complain, argue and/or contest FREE tree trimming by the utilities. Some communities or cities make you get a permit to cut down a tree.
In other words many that are complaining about the lack of power now are probably many of the same crowd that protests the little routine tree trimming and removal many utilities do.
This makes the utilities gun shy including a less thorough job of trimming meaning the same tree will be threatening the same line just a few years later.
Still no excuse for a painfully slow repair process or lack of communication.
What makes you think its painfully slow? Those poor guys are working double shifts on a system that is largely destroyed.
carpetbaggers

Bryn Mawr, PA

#16 Nov 5, 2012
Citizen44 wrote:
<quoted text>
What makes you think its painfully slow? Those poor guys are working double shifts on a system that is largely destroyed.
For the person waiting for power it's slow especially with inaccurate or no promise to repair by times. I was out of power 2 weeks after a hurricane with neighbors across the street restored in 3 days. ZERO, no contact with power company as to why or when, literally left in the dark. I'm not saying the on ground workers are loafing but the process wether it's the priorities of the customers to be repaired or the process/decision making involved in the actual repairs SEEMS slow.

With the volume of customers out that means there are main feeds and power generating stations in need of repair. Once they're fixed large volumes of customers should come back on. I don't see that happening in many areas. I understand once your into the actual neighborhoods on an individual grid,run,circut,node etc they're might be different sets of problems to be fixed.

I'm also wondering why these power companies can't run temporary power lines to parts of their plant knocked out. Wouldn't this allow the workers to repair unpowered lines safer and quicker? They have submarine cable for underground/underwater don't they? why not layout some cable on the ground parallel to the damaged poles and lines while they're working on it. Since those areas would coned off as a worksite and line with workers & trucks that would minimize the chance of vandalism,theft of accidents. Point being I just get the impression they are doing things the way they did 50 years ago.

We had ONE pole knocked out by a car in an accident. It took 5 line trucks and 2 vans of techs and equipment 14 hours to replace ONE pole. The good news except for a few power wasn't lost. But seven vehicles of techs and equipment and 14 hours to replace ONE pole?

“'never'”

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#17 Nov 5, 2012
The infrastructure is obviously heavily damaged, and it is not possible to give anything but a rough estimate. And thanks for your advice on how to fix the system (2nd paragraph) I'm sure you're the only one who thought of that.

If you lived in reality you'd understand. And your story about 7 trucks taking 14 hours to fix one pole is not credible.

“'never'”

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#18 Nov 5, 2012
Lets all have a big cry and hate-festival aimed at the utilities! That will make us feel better.
carpetbaggers

Bryn Mawr, PA

#19 Nov 5, 2012
Citizen44 wrote:
The infrastructure is obviously heavily damaged, and it is not possible to give anything but a rough estimate. And thanks for your advice on how to fix the system (2nd paragraph) I'm sure you're the only one who thought of that.
If you lived in reality you'd understand. And your story about 7 trucks taking 14 hours to fix one pole is not credible.
5 line trucks and 2 vans

-Phone Company augered the hole and placed the pole

-The power company transfered LOWER power cables from old damaged pole to new pole. 2 line/bucket trucks at the damaged pole and another on pole down playing with slack issues.

-Third party contractors placed the 'T' and moved the upper wires/cables on to the new T and insulators.

I've had the local power company out on other problems and they said they don't have true lineman anymore, they want to contract that out. They are also heavily unionized. So between the company-union contract and use of contractors by the power company this happens and happend before.

We had tornadoes here several years ago,not national news making but enough damage for out of state help. Out of town crews did entire blocks of pole replacements and repairs. The local company did not. In this case it forced larger neighborhoods to wait for power while smaller/different neighborhoods got their power restored last. So repairs are not necessarily prioritized logical or by size.

Point being depending company, unions and outsourcing things can take time which is what is happening in Connecticut and other places.
BPT

Bristol, CT

#20 Nov 5, 2012
here's something i observed while waiting for my power to be restored, yesterday at 7 pm.

a HUGE tree fell on madison ave in front of testo's resturant.
knocked down two poles blocked the entire street. that was fixed and up and running by wednesday 11/7.
is it because mario testa is the head of the demcratic party here in bridgeport?

what do YOU think?
clinton

Naugatuck, CT

#21 Nov 5, 2012
BPT wrote:
here's something i observed while waiting for my power to be restored, yesterday at 7 pm.
a HUGE tree fell on madison ave in front of testo's resturant.
knocked down two poles blocked the entire street. that was fixed and up and running by wednesday 11/7.
is it because mario testa is the head of the demcratic party here in bridgeport?
what do YOU think?
female staffer whose sole function was sexual.

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