Rio Grande minnow's plight could affect others

Dec 26, 2012 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: KOB-TV New Mexico

Water managers are scrambling to find a way to maintain wild populations of the Rio Grande silvery minnow after the annual fall census failed to locate any of the small fish for the first time in 20 years.

Comments
21 - 38 of 38 Comments Last updated Dec 29, 2012
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

“Kees Mee, I's Ireesh”

Since: Jun 09

Ol' Juarez

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#21
Dec 26, 2012
 
Bluntly Spoken wrote:
<quoted text>
Naw, never been a fan of turkey, duck years ago but to fatty now so either chicken or prime rib.....
Fish if real and not farmed fish which really has no true ocean flavor.
I like turkey, chicken and some red meat, but no sea food of any kind.
Gottfried

Albuquerque, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#22
Dec 26, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

Despite the best efforts of the Environmental Grandees, the Silvery Minnow appears to be soon meeting its demise.

It will well reside as one defunct critter in the lower pantheon of animal extinctions, well below the Wooly Mammoth, the Dodo Bird, and the Passenger Pigeon.

Perhaps we will be able to re-establish all of them with their DNA.

The clever creatures, however, seem to resist annihilation.

The Snakes and debilitating debauchers of humanity thrive even unto this very hour.

Witness the communist democrat party as an example.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#23
Dec 27, 2012
 

Judged:

2

1

1

Lobo Viejo wrote:
I find it incredible just how ingorant many people are on the issue of extinctions and loss of biodiversity.
Its not the Silvery minnow that's the problem, its the lengths and other causes/effects that occur due to saving it that are. Less water available for farming or drinking as an example. At what point should we draw the line?

Yes, by their very existence, creatures have a place in nature, but extinction has too. Natures way of moving on and weeding out the no longer necessary species. Again, we need to balance our efforts IMO to that extent.

“26.2”

Since: Feb 08

Santa Fe, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#24
Dec 27, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

CornDogz wrote:
<quoted text>
Its not the Silvery minnow that's the problem, its the lengths and other causes/effects that occur due to saving it that are. Less water available for farming or drinking as an example. At what point should we draw the line?
Yes, by their very existence, creatures have a place in nature, but extinction has too. Natures way of moving on and weeding out the no longer necessary species. Again, we need to balance our efforts IMO to that extent.
You are absolutely correct about balance. But mankind has disturbed the natural balance to a degree that is not yet fully realized. Everyone needs to put aside the political rhetoric, look at our children and GK's, and ask ourselves what kind of world we are going to leave for them? It's not a decision of whether we give up food and drinking water to save the silvery minnow, although the anti-environmental zealots portray it that way. It's about using less-wasteful irrigation technology, giving up some of our lawns and golf courses, and finding more uses for treated sewage.

“26.2”

Since: Feb 08

Santa Fe, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#25
Dec 27, 2012
 

Judged:

2

2

2

Gottfried wrote:
Despite the best efforts of the Environmental Grandees, the Silvery Minnow appears to be soon meeting its demise.
It will well reside as one defunct critter in the lower pantheon of animal extinctions, well below the Wooly Mammoth, the Dodo Bird, and the Passenger Pigeon.
Perhaps we will be able to re-establish all of them with their DNA.
The clever creatures, however, seem to resist annihilation.
The Snakes and debilitating debauchers of humanity thrive even unto this very hour.
Witness the communist democrat party as an example.
Vorgon poetry at it's absolute worst.

“26.2”

Since: Feb 08

Santa Fe, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#26
Dec 27, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

That should be Vogon poetry. My apologies to the Vorgon world.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#27
Dec 27, 2012
 
Lobo Viejo wrote:
<quoted text>
You are absolutely correct about balance. But mankind has disturbed the natural balance to a degree that is not yet fully realized. Everyone needs to put aside the political rhetoric, look at our children and GK's, and ask ourselves what kind of world we are going to leave for them? It's not a decision of whether we give up food and drinking water to save the silvery minnow, although the anti-environmental zealots portray it that way. It's about using less-wasteful irrigation technology, giving up some of our lawns and golf courses, and finding more uses for treated sewage.
Fully agreed - I've no problems with trying to save things when it makes sense to do so w/o destroying other necessities. Annoy mother nature and you'll know it, then the tit-for-tat begins. Don't need that!!

I'm still really curious about this supposed HUGE water aquifer in the southern part of NM, the one touted years ago as having some 150+ years worth of water in it. Then all of a sudden like a fart in the wind, nothing more has ever been mentioned about it.
More

Santa Fe, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#28
Dec 27, 2012
 

Judged:

2

2

2

CornDogz wrote:
<quoted text>
Its not the Silvery minnow that's the problem, its the lengths and other causes/effects that occur due to saving it that are. Less water available for farming or drinking as an example. At what point should we draw the line?
Yes, by their very existence, creatures have a place in nature, but extinction has too. Natures way of moving on and weeding out the no longer necessary species. Again, we need to balance our efforts IMO to that extent.
We do go to some lengths to preserve what is left of this species but the most effective long-term measures are those that focus letting the river be a river and provide habitat that works for a full range of plant and animal life wherever that is possible. It is hard to put a dollar value on that.

If you want to talk about balance just remember the lengths we have gone to for over 100 years and annualy to build and maintain our water storage, diversion and delivery system on this river and prevent flooding of structures in the floodplain. None of this would survive a cost benefit analysis with so much of the water consumed and polluted to produce a low value animal feed.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#30
Dec 27, 2012
 

Judged:

2

1

1

More wrote:
<quoted text>
We do go to some lengths to preserve what is left of this species but the most effective long-term measures are those that focus letting the river be a river and provide habitat that works for a full range of plant and animal life wherever that is possible. It is hard to put a dollar value on that.
If you want to talk about balance just remember the lengths we have gone to for over 100 years and annualy to build and maintain our water storage, diversion and delivery system on this river and prevent flooding of structures in the floodplain. None of this would survive a cost benefit analysis with so much of the water consumed and polluted to produce a low value animal feed.
Im not looking at the direct monetary impact but rather the indirect impact, be it monetary or otherwise. Sure, there is room for give in areas I'm sure, however the zealots could care less how it all will impact humans, just as long as the species in preserved in its native habitat - regardless of who suffers.

“26.2”

Since: Feb 08

Santa Fe, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31
Dec 27, 2012
 
CornDogz wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm still really curious about this supposed HUGE water aquifer in the southern part of NM, the one touted years ago as having some 150+ years worth of water in it. Then all of a sudden like a fart in the wind, nothing more has ever been mentioned about it.
I don't remember hearing about this proverbial aquifer. But, from what you have described, it sounds like the news media got their hands on some hydrologic info and hyped it up out of proportion.

“26.2”

Since: Feb 08

Santa Fe, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#32
Dec 27, 2012
 

Judged:

1

More wrote:
<quoted text>
We do go to some lengths to preserve what is left of this species but the most effective long-term measures are those that focus letting the river be a river and provide habitat that works for a full range of plant and animal life wherever that is possible. It is hard to put a dollar value on that.
If you want to talk about balance just remember the lengths we have gone to for over 100 years and annualy to build and maintain our water storage, diversion and delivery system on this river and prevent flooding of structures in the floodplain. None of this would survive a cost benefit analysis with so much of the water consumed and polluted to produce a low value animal feed.
Low value animal feed? Have you bought a bale of hay recently? The price of alfalfa, in particular, has skyrocketed.
Well

Santa Fe, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#33
Dec 27, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Lobo Viejo wrote:
<quoted text>
Low value animal feed? Have you bought a bale of hay recently? The price of alfalfa, in particular, has skyrocketed.
200-300 a ton delivered. If water from the Rio used to produce it wasn't basically free, nobody would be doing it.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#34
Dec 28, 2012
 
Lobo Viejo wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't remember hearing about this proverbial aquifer. But, from what you have described, it sounds like the news media got their hands on some hydrologic info and hyped it up out of proportion.
Nahhh, not the media - they wouldn't spin thing w/o proper credible knowledge forst<VVVVVBG>!! I wouldn't be at all surprised were that the case. It was somewhere around 10 or so years back, then nada after that. Supposedly around Ruidoso in very general terms but I distinctly remember reading that it was huge, covered much of the southern central part of NM and its life was estimated to be at least of 150 years worth of water for NM. IIRC there was a comment re removal of all the alkali from it. Seems like it was a Journal, or maybe the Trib article back then.

“26.2”

Since: Feb 08

Santa Fe, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#35
Dec 28, 2012
 
CornDogz wrote:
<quoted text>
Nahhh, not the media - they wouldn't spin thing w/o proper credible knowledge forst<VVVVVBG>!! I wouldn't be at all surprised were that the case. It was somewhere around 10 or so years back, then nada after that. Supposedly around Ruidoso in very general terms but I distinctly remember reading that it was huge, covered much of the southern central part of NM and its life was estimated to be at least of 150 years worth of water for NM. IIRC there was a comment re removal of all the alkali from it. Seems like it was a Journal, or maybe the Trib article back then.
I would have remembered a story like this if I had seen it. Maybe I was travelling when it came out. But this mega-aquifer definitely sounds like somebody's hydrological wet dream.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#36
Dec 28, 2012
 
Lobo Viejo wrote:
<quoted text>
I would have remembered a story like this if I had seen it. Maybe I was travelling when it came out. But this mega-aquifer definitely sounds like somebody's hydrological wet dream.
Perhaps some mega-developer, stranger things have occurred.
Observer

Albuquerque, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#37
Dec 28, 2012
 
Lobo Viejo wrote:
I find it incredible just how ingorant many people are on the issue of extinctions and loss of biodiversity.
First of all none of us have the right to play God and condem a species to extinction from our doing. Being the sophisiticated tool-making primates that we are, we should take better care of the planet and the plants and critters that God created.
Second, and more importantly, extinctions disrupt the food chain and order of nature, and open the door for invasive species and other consequences. The bee colony collapse disorder and the Schmalenberg virus appear to be related, at least in part, to invasive species.
At the basic level, it's pretty simple. The silvery minnow eats something, and something eats it. Take the minnow out, and the surviving species adapt, and the things that they eat and that eat them adapt up and down the chain. But there can be other unanticipated consequences.
So many things with our ecosystems are inter-related and it has proven impossible thus far to predict the consequences of our foolish actions until the problems smack us in the face. And all the political disinformation and denial just make things worse. The political BS will end when we have a honey-bee type of problem caused by climate change.
What is really troubling is what's going on in our oceans with overfishing, warming, loss of coral reef habitats, etc.
Fortunately, at least for now, the decisions about the silvery minnow and other endangered species are being made by people who can put aside the selfish, greedy, and narrow-mided ignorance that is so common to mankind.
Interesting to see you reference God in a non-derogatory way.

“26.2”

Since: Feb 08

Santa Fe, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#38
Dec 28, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Observer wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting to see you reference God in a non-derogatory way.
I don't have a problem with the various Gods of various religions. My problem is with religious fanatics who seek to impose their beliefs on everyone else, or who kill people in the name of their God.
Concha Pena

Albuquerque, NM

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#39
Dec 29, 2012
 
Where have all the MINNOWS gone, far, far away. When will they ever go? Human transportation's RULES.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

First Prev
of 2
Next Last
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

•••
•••