Who is the US arming in Syria? Presid...

Who is the US arming in Syria? President Assad rubs his hands at news of rebel split

There are 153 comments on the The Independent story from Jul 12, 2013, titled Who is the US arming in Syria? President Assad rubs his hands at news of rebel split. In it, The Independent reports that:

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George

Red Deer, Canada

#64 Jul 22, 2013
Syrian wrote:
<quoted text> They have no rules beyond their borders!
These are the people you are blindly supporting:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-2...

rtloder

Since: Nov 12

Sydney, Australia

#65 Jul 22, 2013
George wrote:
<quoted text>
These are the people you are blindly supporting:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-2...

That could be true we don't know that yet.
Problem is when there are foreign militias who still wrongly believe the western perceptions carries any weight in Syria , then they are likely to commit carnage on behalf of SAA.
False fag ,after all its not their relations.
Still heaps more humane than Depleted Uranium and the spasticicity that the Jew left behind in Fallujah, and now Basra getting a mention.
Promise of many more to come.
And funny thing is USJew hung their friend to promote their enemy .
Tell us how that works out.??????
Let me try.
Bastards are mad.
Syrian

Waterford, CT

#66 Jul 23, 2013
Comm wrote:
<quoted text>
I think Morsi's credibility as a democratic president was lost when he attempted to control unlimited power.
Anyways, what do you think Egyptian should have done then?
Waited for another election, like people do in all other "Democracies"!
mxlplx

United States

#67 Jul 23, 2013
Syrian wrote:
<quoted text> Waited for another election, like people do in all other "Democracies"!
Egypt is a work in progress. It's not even Democracy V1.0 yet. It's still in beta and working out the bugs. Patience.

IMO: Right or wrong, too many Egyptians thought of Mursi as a trojan, trying to hijack the operating system.
Syrian

Waterford, CT

#68 Jul 23, 2013
mxlplx wrote:
<quoted text>
Egypt is a work in progress. It's not even Democracy V1.0 yet. It's still in beta and working out the bugs. Patience.
IMO: Right or wrong, too many Egyptians thought of Mursi as a trojan, trying to hijack the operating system.
And I'm sure they will probably be unhappy with whoever is next, so will they oust him as well?
mxlplx

United States

#69 Jul 23, 2013
Syrian wrote:
<quoted text> And I'm sure they will probably be unhappy with whoever is next, so will they oust him as well?
Constitution needs revamping, to allocate seats based on some representational quota formula plus amendments to limit executive powers.
It's not by accident that a balance of powers has kept our system intact, more or less.

That's my take, just based on observation from afar.
mxlplx

United States

#70 Jul 23, 2013
From what I understand, the original constitution was forged under the compromising pressures of time, revolution and chaos. Haste makes waste, always has. Nothing wrong to my mind about making a second go of it. To be honest, most historical turning points have been decided by lady luck or the proverbial flip of a coin anyway. Not exactly an optimal approach to progress.
mxlplx

United States

#71 Jul 23, 2013
What suggests to me that this is not some run of the mill military coup is the backing of a significant number of Egyptian and Middle Eastern academics. These are folks that typically consider military coups as anathema.

Time will tell, I guess.
mxlplx

United States

#72 Jul 23, 2013
Last word on the subject:

We ourselves have a method of removing a leader from office: impeachment.

I consider this case a very rudimentary form of impeachment.

<end of rant>
mxlplx

United States

#73 Jul 23, 2013
That's why I consider the West's approach to Syria misguided and self-defeating. Call me a cock-eyed optimist, something like Tom Friedman standing on his head, but if the West's goal is to see representational democracies take root in the middle east, then backing a disjointed Syrian opposition on frail legs and infiltrated by totally undemocratic extremist forces is not a smart way to go. Instead, you push for revision within the existing governments. I think that chance maybe already be lost in Syria but imagine, if you will, a functional democracy taking root in Egypt and then affecting 2014 elections in Syria. Iran already has a democratic structure, albeit often at odds with or (mis)guided by its religious rulers. Iran is also a work in progress. Human nature dictates that when countries see their neighbors sailing the winds of change, they tend to want to catch the wind themselves. Unfortunately, such a scenario is in direct conflict with the the radical Islamic movements vying with it for dominance.

Who knows? We could be in for a Middle Eastern version of Europe's Thirty Years War of the 1600's.
Really

Sweden

#74 Jul 26, 2013
Syrian wrote:
<quoted text> Waited for another election, like people do in all other "Democracies"!
So, you mean even if Government is acting like a dictator, shoving some unfair laws and not doing anything to maintain economic stability, people should just accept it and wait for another election?
Really?
Democracy is not all about election. It is for the people and by the people.
And what Muslim Brotherhood was doing in Egypt wasn't for the people. It was for their Islamists belief which they wanted to shove down people's throat. And just because they won election doesn't mean they had right to do so.
orion

Johannesburg, South Africa

#75 Jul 26, 2013
rtloder wrote:
<quoted text>
That could be true we don't know that yet.
Problem is when there are foreign militias who still wrongly believe the western perceptions carries any weight in Syria , then they are likely to commit carnage on behalf of SAA.
False fag ,after all its not their relations.
Still heaps more humane than Depleted Uranium and the spasticicity that the Jew left behind in Fallujah, and now Basra getting a mention.
Promise of many more to come.
And funny thing is USJew hung their friend to promote their enemy .
Tell us how that works out.??????
Let me try.
Bastards are mad.
False flags operations are common. Remember how Beria's NKVD squad dressed in SS uniforms burnt and slaughtered millions of Russian behind German lines in WW II under Stalin Torchman order. All Stalin's police chiefs were Jews ...
orion

Johannesburg, South Africa

#76 Jul 26, 2013
Really wrote:
<quoted text>
So, you mean even if Government is acting like a dictator, shoving some unfair laws and not doing anything to maintain economic stability, people should just accept it and wait for another election?
Really?
Democracy is not all about election. It is for the people and by the people.
And what Muslim Brotherhood was doing in Egypt wasn't for the people. It was for their Islamists belief which they wanted to shove down people's throat. And just because they won election doesn't mean they had right to do so.
You must be joking...! Democracy is for the people , by the people... Where do you come from? Democracy is simply the right to choose between different horses which belong to the same stable. When the Swiss people in a refefendum voted overwhelmingly against the invasion of their country by 10 of thousands aliens, the Swiss President just out of the Bildeburger Conference stated: "The people cannot be trusted with Democracy". Only the rotten elite can...For the masses, democracy is just an illusion.
orion

Johannesburg, South Africa

#77 Jul 26, 2013
mxlplx wrote:
That's why I consider the West's approach to Syria misguided and self-defeating. Call me a cock-eyed optimist, something like Tom Friedman standing on his head, but if the West's goal is to see representational democracies take root in the middle east, then backing a disjointed Syrian opposition on frail legs and infiltrated by totally undemocratic extremist forces is not a smart way to go. Instead, you push for revision within the existing governments. I think that chance maybe already be lost in Syria but imagine, if you will, a functional democracy taking root in Egypt and then affecting 2014 elections in Syria. Iran already has a democratic structure, albeit often at odds with or (mis)guided by its religious rulers. Iran is also a work in progress. Human nature dictates that when countries see their neighbors sailing the winds of change, they tend to want to catch the wind themselves. Unfortunately, such a scenario is in direct conflict with the the radical Islamic movements vying with it for dominance.
Who knows? We could be in for a Middle Eastern version of Europe's Thirty Years War of the 1600's.
Good point!
orion

Johannesburg, South Africa

#78 Jul 26, 2013
mxlplx wrote:
Last word on the subject:
We ourselves have a method of removing a leader from office: impeachment.
I consider this case a very rudimentary form of impeachment.
<end of rant>
Yeah! Where is Lewinsky?
orion

Johannesburg, South Africa

#79 Jul 26, 2013
Syrian wrote:
<quoted text> And I'm sure they will probably be unhappy with whoever is next, so will they oust him as well?
The problem with Egypt is simply the story of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: The false prophets, famine, pestilence and war.With a population breeding like rabbits presently 84 million on a small band along the river, it is just a question of time before the state collapses. Then Nature will take its course.
orion

Johannesburg, South Africa

#80 Jul 26, 2013
George wrote:
<quoted text>
These are the people you are blindly supporting:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-2...
Well George, nice to see that you are with us. You must be the last of the four stooges...Oh Well! At least you haven't changed!
Comment

Kathmandu, Nepal

#81 Jul 26, 2013
Syrian wrote:
<quoted text> And I'm sure they will probably be unhappy with whoever is next, so will they oust him as well?
I don't think Egyptian are revolting for fun.
They want positive change, both economically and socially.
It is up to the government, who promise them all that, during the election, that have to fulfill it.
Like they have been saying, they didn't remove one dictator to replace with another dictator.

And I think it is same in all countries. In most countries, parliament or opposition are strong enough to ask for resignation of head of state if they fail.
But in Egypt, they weren't strong enough. So, people had to come to street again. And still, Morsi didn't resign. Instead, he told his supporters to be ready for sacrifice. That is not a sign of a democratic ruler or a good leader.
rio

Bromley, UK

#82 Jul 26, 2013
There is a difference between being elected democratically, and acting as a democratic leader.

Without knowing it, the Egyptians had elected an incompetent dictator in Morsi; he was more interested in advancing the cause of Islam than in solving his country's problems.

Morsi betrayed his people and his country.
The Muslim Brotherhood isn't the solution but the problem.
made up moniker

Wealdstone, UK

#83 Jul 26, 2013
rio wrote:
There is a difference between being elected democratically, and acting as a democratic leader.
Without knowing it, the Egyptians had elected an incompetent dictator in Morsi; he was more interested in advancing the cause of Islam than in solving his country's problems.
Morsi betrayed his people and his country.
The Muslim Brotherhood isn't the solution but the problem.
I agree. I too hope Egypt installs a 'government for the people'.

Then they can get back to much more important things, like hacking their daughters genitalia off.

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