'The War Is Not Over'

'The War Is Not Over'

There are 276658 comments on the Los Angeles Times story from Sep 12, 2006, titled 'The War Is Not Over'. In it, Los Angeles Times reports that:

WASHINGTON - President Bush led the nation on Monday in marking the fifth anniversary of the Sept.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Los Angeles Times.

henry

Ilmenau, Germany

#288114 May 30, 2013
Andy wrote:
<quoted text>yes, we need more religion. Down with Communism.
At least: we Need more peace. What we get: is nuclear accidents and gaus!
Andy

Ardsley, NY

#288115 May 30, 2013
spocko wrote:
<quoted text>
Reaganomics is total disaster look at the Swiss rejecting supply-side-voodoo-economics, they have less than 3 percent unemployment and their public school systems obviously works educating the young for a thriving economy! I actually liked Reagan as a politician but he f-d up big time! It is beyond me or any reasonable person to understand why GOPers, to this day, insist that supply side economics works -- it has not and it never will!
Swiss economy is a closed economy. They deal in illegal monies of the world. Even the Mafia can live comfortably in the US during a recession. What would happen to the Swiss economy if millions of North Africans would move in illegally? Go ask Spain and France.

Duh! If you had an enormous supply of beef, the price of steaks and hamburgers would go down. If there was a glut of oil the price would go down.
Andy

Ardsley, NY

#288116 May 30, 2013
henry wrote:
<quoted text>
At least: we Need more peace. What we get: is nuclear accidents and gaus!
we need more peaceful religions. Better trained nuclear scientist.
Andy

Ardsley, NY

#288117 May 30, 2013
Down with Communism and Big Socialism
Andy

Ardsley, NY

#288118 May 30, 2013
Down with California and new socialistic run rail system
Andy

Ardsley, NY

#288119 May 30, 2013
California railroad is like the road to nowhere.
Andy

Ardsley, NY

#288120 May 30, 2013
Socialistic run railroads are too expensive for the masses to ride
John_Schuylkill County_Pa

Sunbury, PA

#288121 May 30, 2013
Andy wrote:
California railroad is like the road to nowhere.
They would like to blame George Bush. Bush would have enough common sense that you go center city to center city
John_Schuylkill County_Pa

Sunbury, PA

#288122 May 30, 2013
Andy wrote:
California railroad is like the road to nowhere.
Could have fixed a lot of bridges for the billions
henry

Germany

#288123 May 30, 2013
ABs wrote:
But when a U.S. citizen goes abroad to wage war against America -- and is actively plotting to kill U.S. citizens; and when neither the United States, nor our partners are in a position to capture him before he carries out a plot -- his citizenship should no more serve as a shield than a sniper shooting down on an innocent crowd should be protected from a swat team
That's who Anwar Awlaki was -- he was continuously trying to kill people. He helped oversee the 2010 plot to detonate explosive devices on two U.S. bound cargo planes. He was involved in planning to blow up an airliner in 2009. When Farouk Abdulmutallab -- the Christmas Day bomber -- went to Yemen in 2009, Awlaki hosted him, approved his suicide operation, and helped him tape a martyrdom video to be shown after the attack. His last instructions were to blow up the airplane when it was over American soil. I would have detained and prosecuted Awlaki if we captured him before he carried out a plot. But we couldn't. And as President, I would have been derelict in my duty had I not authorized the strike that took out Awlaki.
Of course, the targeting of any Americans raises constitutional issues that are not present in other strikes -- which is why my Administration submitted information about Awlaki to the Department of Justice months before Awlaki was killed, and briefed the Congress before this strike as well. But the high threshold that we have set for taking lethal action applies to all potential terrorist targets, regardless of whether or not they are American citizens. This threshold respects the inherent dignity of every human life. Alongside the decision to put our men and women in uniform in harm's way, the decision to use force against individuals or groups -- even against a sworn enemy of the United States -- is the hardest thing I do as president. But these decisions must be made, given my responsibility to protect the American people.
Going forward, I have asked my administration to review proposals to extend oversight of lethal actions outside of warzones that go beyond our reporting to Congress. Each option has virtues in theory, but poses difficulties in practice. For example, the establishment of a special court to evaluate and authorize lethal action has the benefit of bringing a third branch of government into the process, but raises serious constitutional issues about presidential and judicial authority. Another idea that's been suggested -- the establishment of an independent oversight board in the executive branch -- avoids those problems, but may introduce a layer of bureaucracy into national-security decision-making, without inspiring additional public confidence in the process. Despite these challenges, I look forward to actively engaging Congress to explore these -- and other -- options for increased oversight.
I believe, however, that the use of force must be seen as part of a larger discussion about a comprehensive counter-terrorism strategy. Because for all the focus on the use of force, force alone cannot make us safe. We cannot use force everywhere that a radical ideology takes root; and in the absence of a strategy that reduces the well-spring of extremism, a perpetual war -- through drones or Special Forces or troop deployments -- will prove self-defeating, and alter our country in troubling ways.
So the next element of our strategy involves addressing the underlying grievances and conflicts that feed extremism, from North Africa to South Asia. As we've learned this past decade, this is a vast and complex undertaking. We must be humble in our expectation that we can quickly resolve deep rooted problems like poverty and sectarian hatred. Moreover, no two countries are alike, and some will undergo chaotic change before things get better. But our security and values demand that we make the effort.
This means patiently...
Capitalism means steady war. In the nuclear Age the danger of deferring the Extinction is short!
henry

Germany

#288124 May 30, 2013
ABs wrote:
But when a U.S. citizen goes abroad to wage war against America -- and is actively plotting to kill U.S. citizens; and when neither the United States, nor our partners are in a position to capture him before he carries out a plot -- his citizenship should no more serve as a shield than a sniper shooting down on an innocent crowd should be protected from a swat team
That's who Anwar Awlaki was -- he was continuously trying to kill people. He helped oversee the 2010 plot to detonate explosive devices on two U.S. bound cargo planes. He was involved in planning to blow up an airliner in 2009. When Farouk Abdulmutallab -- the Christmas Day bomber -- went to Yemen in 2009, Awlaki hosted him, approved his suicide operation, and helped him tape a martyrdom video to be shown after the attack. His last instructions were to blow up the airplane when it was over American soil. I would have detained and prosecuted Awlaki if we captured him before he carried out a plot. But we couldn't. And as President, I would have been derelict in my duty had I not authorized the strike that took out Awlaki.
Of course, the targeting of any Americans raises constitutional issues that are not present in other strikes -- which is why my Administration submitted information about Awlaki to the Department of Justice months before Awlaki was killed, and briefed the Congress before this strike as well. But the high threshold that we have set for taking lethal action applies to all potential terrorist targets, regardless of whether or not they are American citizens. This threshold respects the inherent dignity of every human life. Alongside the decision to put our men and women in uniform in harm's way, the decision to use force against individuals or groups -- even against a sworn enemy of the United States -- is the hardest thing I do as president. But these decisions must be made, given my responsibility to protect the American people.
Going forward, I have asked my administration to review proposals to extend oversight of lethal actions outside of warzones that go beyond our reporting to Congress. Each option has virtues in theory, but poses difficulties in practice. For example, the establishment of a special court to evaluate and authorize lethal action has the benefit of bringing a third branch of government into the process, but raises serious constitutional issues about presidential and judicial authority. Another idea that's been suggested -- the establishment of an independent oversight board in the executive branch -- avoids those problems, but may introduce a layer of bureaucracy into national-security decision-making, without inspiring additional public confidence in the process. Despite these challenges, I look forward to actively engaging Congress to explore these -- and other -- options for increased oversight.
I believe, however, that the use of force must be seen as part of a larger discussion about a comprehensive counter-terrorism strategy. Because for all the focus on the use of force, force alone cannot make us safe. We cannot use force everywhere that a radical ideology takes root; and in the absence of a strategy that reduces the well-spring of extremism, a perpetual war -- through drones or Special Forces or troop deployments -- will prove self-defeating, and alter our country in troubling ways.
So the next element of our strategy involves addressing the underlying grievances and conflicts that feed extremism, from North Africa to South Asia. As we've learned this past decade, this is a vast and complex undertaking. We must be humble in our expectation that we can quickly resolve deep rooted problems like poverty and sectarian hatred. Moreover, no two countries are alike, and some will undergo chaotic change before things get better. But our security and values demand that we make the effort.
This means patiently...
These Sermons are absolutely senseless. The reality is quite different!
henry

Germany

#288125 May 30, 2013
ABs wrote:
<quoted text>
pretty sure...you and hank are going to hell...
Pope Francis' admission that atheists are capable of doing good has been followed by a Vatican statement clarifying that the church still believes atheists are going to hell. In a corrective statement that suggests people misunderstood the pontiff's remarks, a Vatican spokesman stresses that the church believes all salvation "comes from Christ, the Head, through the Church which is his body," meaning those who refuse to enter or remain in the church "cannot be saved," Salon reports.
The spokesman also makes it clear that church doctrine considers salvation off-limits to members of other religions and other branches of Christianity, although people who have never been exposed to Christianity might still have a shot. "Catholics do not adopt the attitude of religious relativism which regards all religions as on the whole equally justifiable," he writes. The pope's original comments, in which he said the "Lord has redeemed all of us," were welcomed by surprised atheist groups, the Christian Post reports.
Now you know...be afraid, be very afraid...thought you would enjoy this story
Going to hell may be good for the Bible Belt, but it is absolutely foolish for an educated man!
henry

Germany

#288126 May 30, 2013
ABs wrote:
<quoted text>
pretty sure...you and hank are going to hell...
Pope Francis' admission that atheists are capable of doing good has been followed by a Vatican statement clarifying that the church still believes atheists are going to hell. In a corrective statement that suggests people misunderstood the pontiff's remarks, a Vatican spokesman stresses that the church believes all salvation "comes from Christ, the Head, through the Church which is his body," meaning those who refuse to enter or remain in the church "cannot be saved," Salon reports.
The spokesman also makes it clear that church doctrine considers salvation off-limits to members of other religions and other branches of Christianity, although people who have never been exposed to Christianity might still have a shot. "Catholics do not adopt the attitude of religious relativism which regards all religions as on the whole equally justifiable," he writes. The pope's original comments, in which he said the "Lord has redeemed all of us," were welcomed by surprised atheist groups, the Christian Post reports.
Now you know...be afraid, be very afraid...thought you would enjoy this story
All it means to me: amused, very amused it is childish!
henry

Bischofferode, Germany

#288127 May 30, 2013
Pdamerica org wrote:
<quoted text>
Also, Much of the Earths Oceans are still mysteries and unexplored, and who knows what's at the center of the Earth.
GOD created the galaxies so go ask HIM where Heaven is, or better yet, read Revelation.
Never, never was any god. The socalled thousands of gods are just mYTHS NOTHING ELSE!
henry

Bischofferode, Germany

#288128 May 30, 2013
Andy wrote:
<quoted text>we need more peaceful religions. Better trained nuclear scientist.
All religions are crimes and stealing life time!
henry

Bischofferode, Germany

#288129 May 30, 2013
ABs wrote:
<quoted text>
pretty sure...you and hank are going to hell...
Pope Francis' admission that atheists are capable of doing good has been followed by a Vatican statement clarifying that the church still believes atheists are going to hell. In a corrective statement that suggests people misunderstood the pontiff's remarks, a Vatican spokesman stresses that the church believes all salvation "comes from Christ, the Head, through the Church which is his body," meaning those who refuse to enter or remain in the church "cannot be saved," Salon reports.
The spokesman also makes it clear that church doctrine considers salvation off-limits to members of other religions and other branches of Christianity, although people who have never been exposed to Christianity might still have a shot. "Catholics do not adopt the attitude of religious relativism which regards all religions as on the whole equally justifiable," he writes. The pope's original comments, in which he said the "Lord has redeemed all of us," were welcomed by surprised atheist groups, the Christian Post reports.
Now you know...be afraid, be very afraid...thought you would enjoy this story
Now I be amused, very amused!
henry

Bischofferode, Germany

#288130 May 30, 2013
Andy wrote:
<quoted text>you can stay in Germany. Let me know when the Ruskies cut your fuel off!
Why should they? They are not cracy like westerners!
ABs

Aiken, SC

#288131 May 30, 2013
Comrade MUQ...RUSSIAN MISSILES have arrived in Syria for Assad's use...your thoughts?
henry

Bischofferode, Germany

#288132 May 30, 2013
John_Schuylkill County_Pa wrote:
<quoted text>Capitalism built this great country. Socialism is killing it
This "great Country" has almost killed the native Indian Population, deforrested big parts of the Country, caused catastrophic Tornados, hundreds of AKWs which are a dangerous cause for the Population. All in the interests of a ruling billionairs Group an their superprofits.
henry

Bischofferode, Germany

#288133 May 30, 2013
Andy wrote:
<quoted text>we need more peaceful religions. Better trained nuclear scientist.
All we get is superprofits for a small bunch of billionairs and of course any number of devasteting wars.!

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