The Recovery Place Drug Rehab and Alc...

The Recovery Place Drug Rehab and Alcohol Treatment Center Has...

There are 40 comments on the PRWeb story from May 13, 2011, titled The Recovery Place Drug Rehab and Alcohol Treatment Center Has.... In it, PRWeb reports that:

The Recovery Place Drug Rehab and Alcohol Treatment Center Has Launched a New Website: ChristianDrugAbuse.com The Recovery Place is a drug rehab and alcohol treatment center that understands the complexities of alcohol and drug addiction and treats it as a disease that affects everyone differently.

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Kelli

Orlando, FL

#1 May 13, 2011
I have almost 6 months clean today and I have only God and The Recovery Place to thank for that. I spent almost 4 months on the christian trac @ The Recovery Place and my life has forever been changed. Upon returning home and continuing my follow up care I was in a search to find a church and group of recovering addicts living life clean and happy,my experience at the Recovery Place was so uplifting and life changing that I left there loving myself and knowing I deserved recovery and happiness and the only way I was going to get that was to remember one thing and that is this, "anything I put in front of my recovery I will lose" therefore I have to keep God and my recovery first and live one day at a time.To many those are just words after my stay at the recovery place they mean something to me now. The christian program and Charlotte the primary clinician truly have impacted me and I thank God for that.
JJFLORIDA

AOL

#2 May 14, 2011
Kelli wrote:
I have almost 6 months clean today and I have only God and The Recovery Place to thank for that. I spent almost 4 months on the christian trac @ The Recovery Place and my life has forever been changed. Upon returning home and continuing my follow up care I was in a search to find a church and group of recovering addicts living life clean and happy,my experience at the Recovery Place was so uplifting and life changing that I left there loving myself and knowing I deserved recovery and happiness and the only way I was going to get that was to remember one thing and that is this, "anything I put in front of my recovery I will lose" therefore I have to keep God and my recovery first and live one day at a time.To many those are just words after my stay at the recovery place they mean something to me now. The christian program and Charlotte the primary clinician truly have impacted me and I thank God for that.
Well You Did Good ,, Keep Up The Good Work, And Spred The Word About The Recovery Place
I'm Happy For You
Sheik Yerbouti

Warrington, PA

#3 May 14, 2011
Hopefully the courts are not sentencing defendants to this fundietard cult! Usually so called 'christian' drug rehabs provide no science of medical based services. Take your cult 'rehab' elsewhere!

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#4 May 16, 2011
The Sheik is absolutely right. 6 months in, you're in the honeymoon phase of life in the cult...and I don't mean to bring you down, but you need to be realistic about some things, such as the long term success rate. Have you researched this? Empower yourself and don't rely on the 12-step misinformation.
dpw

United States

#5 May 17, 2011
I am exploring The Recovery Place for my son who is an addict .... Is this facility a cult? What is the name of the religous group?

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#6 May 17, 2011
dpw wrote:
I am exploring The Recovery Place for my son who is an addict .... Is this facility a cult? What is the name of the religous group?
While considering any program for your son, be leary of cults. The most common cult associated with treatment facilities is Alcoholics Anonymous. It suprises many to hear it referred to as a cult, but it most certainly is. AA has about a 5% success rate, the same as spontaneous remission (those that simply quit) and a higher rate of suicide, hospitalizations and re-arrests. It is also a haven for sexual predators and dogmatic control freaks. The cult teaches people that they are powerless and insane, and must surrender to the cult and it's concept of God completely to escape death. Scientology also has a recovery program called Narcanon and it's own treatment centers, and they are also a dangerous cult though not as prolific in the "recovery" business.

I don't know about this facility specifically, but based upon the first poster's comments, it is almost certainly 12 Step (AA) based. They will charge anywhere from $7,000 to $40,000 for nothing more than indoctrination into their religion.

Your son isn't likely to quit unless he is ready, the success rate is even lower for those that are forced. If he does genuinely wish to stop, I recommend that you look for SMART meetings in your area or look for books and online support such as Rational Recovery. Family and friends (that aren't addicted themselves) are a great support system too.
Kelli

Cocoa, FL

#7 May 18, 2011
Headhunter 300M wrote:
<quoted text>
While considering any program for your son, be leary of cults. The most common cult associated with treatment facilities is Alcoholics Anonymous. It suprises many to hear it referred to as a cult, but it most certainly is. AA has about a 5% success rate, the same as spontaneous remission (those that simply quit) and a higher rate of suicide, hospitalizations and re-arrests. It is also a haven for sexual predators and dogmatic control freaks. The cult teaches people that they are powerless and insane, and must surrender to the cult and it's concept of God completely to escape death. Scientology also has a recovery program called Narcanon and it's own treatment centers, and they are also a dangerous cult though not as prolific in the "recovery" business
I don't know about this facility specifically, but based upon the first poster's comments, it is almost certainly 12 Step (AA) based. They will charge anywhere from $7,000 to $40,000 for nothing more than indoctrination into their religion.
Your son isn't likely to quit unless he is ready, the success rate is even lower for those that are forced. If he does genuinely wish to stop, I recommend that you look for SMART meetings in your area or look for books and online support such as Rational Recovery. Family and friends (that aren't addicted themselves) are a great support system too.


I have just a few minutes but I am an addict in recovery and I just want you to know that if books and online help were all your son needed that would be a miracle. I can just say to you yes it is true unless he is ready you cant help him but if he is ready I will say that THE RECOVERY PLACE changed my life it is not a cult you can chose between christian and traditional trac and the staff cares they really do and if you are ready for help they are ready to help you but you have to be willing to help yourself and be ready to change.There is no cult but believe me a true addict knows this is going to be the hardest battle you eill ever fight and some one the fight and some dont and just for today I am a winning,recovery is possible if you are ready to recover and are willing to put a smuch in your recovery as you did your drug use.

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#8 May 19, 2011
I never said books and online support were all anyone needed, everybody is different. Talk to a medical doctor as well. Research the success rates of 12 step groups and the treatment centers that support them outside of their own propoganda. The results speak for themselves. AA is a cult. It involves worship of it's prophet (Bill Wilson), unquestioning obedience, teaches people that they are powerless and insane, and can't trust their own thinking...I can go on.

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#9 May 19, 2011

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#10 May 19, 2011
RIP Pleasure Beach

Fairfield, CT

#11 May 19, 2011
Headhunter 300M wrote:
I never said books and online support were all anyone needed, everybody is different. Talk to a medical doctor as well. Research the success rates of 12 step groups and the treatment centers that support them outside of their own propoganda. The results speak for themselves. AA is a cult. It involves worship of it's prophet (Bill Wilson), unquestioning obedience, teaches people that they are powerless and insane, and can't trust their own thinking...I can go on.
A cult forces people to be members, AA doesn't. A cult does not allow people to voluntarily leave, AA does. Find something with better than a 5% success rate for hopeless alcoholics and addicts and recommend that. You can't.

I rest my case.

And Bill Wilson is not considered a "prophet" in AA. Read a book.
TWEEKER

Moline, IL

#12 May 19, 2011
Just slow down,damn man save some for later you don't have to do it all in one day.lol

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#13 May 20, 2011
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
A cult forces people to be members, AA doesn't.
Wrong. First, most cults don't force people to be members, but they certainly pull a lot of bait-and-switch tactics to attract members, then instill fear of leaving the cult. Furthermore, most of AA's recruiting is forced through the court systems and treatment centers.
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text> A cult does not allow people to voluntarily leave, AA does.
Anybody can leave a cult at anytime, but cults are masterful in instilling fear of leaving. AA is no exception.

"Unless each A.A. member follows to the best of his ability our suggested Twelve Steps to recovery, he almost certainly signs his own death warrant."
-Bill Wilson, 12&12 p.174
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>Find something with better than a 5% success rate for hopeless alcoholics and addicts and recommend that. You can't.
I rest my case.
I have no obligation to do so. If someone was selling a phony, quack cure for cancer with a 0% success rate above spontaneous remission and increasing the suicide rate, would you feel obligated to present a working cure before critisizing it? Why?
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>And Bill Wilson is not considered a "prophet" in AA. Read a book.
Yes he is. To a hardcore AA member, anything Bill said is automatically true because he said it. The first 164 pages of the Big Book have not been changed or updated since the first edition was published in 1939. They are considered sacred text. I have personally witnessed MANY AA members state their belief that Bill Wilson was guided by God much the same way that so many would believe the Bible was divinely inspired. Maybe you should read a few books yourself.
RIP Pleasure Beach

Fairfield, CT

#14 May 20, 2011
Headhunter 300M wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong. First, most cults don't force people to be members, but they certainly pull a lot of bait-and-switch tactics to attract members, then instill fear of leaving the cult. Furthermore, most of AA's recruiting is forced through the court systems and treatment centers.
<quoted text>
Anybody can leave a cult at anytime, but cults are masterful in instilling fear of leaving. AA is no exception.
"Unless each A.A. member follows to the best of his ability our suggested Twelve Steps to recovery, he almost certainly signs his own death warrant."
-Bill Wilson, 12&12 p.174
<quoted text>
I have no obligation to do so. If someone was selling a phony, quack cure for cancer with a 0% success rate above spontaneous remission and increasing the suicide rate, would you feel obligated to present a working cure before critisizing it? Why?
<quoted text>
Yes he is. To a hardcore AA member, anything Bill said is automatically true because he said it. The first 164 pages of the Big Book have not been changed or updated since the first edition was published in 1939. They are considered sacred text. I have personally witnessed MANY AA members state their belief that Bill Wilson was guided by God much the same way that so many would believe the Bible was divinely inspired. Maybe you should read a few books yourself.
Have you ever spent significant time in AA? You are sorely misinformed. AA members actually pick out all sorts of faults with Bill W.(ie: he cheated on his wife, he was arrogant, he could not have come up with the ideas for AA on his own, he borrowed much of the program from the Oxford Group etc., etc.)

No one feels pressure to stay in AA. People form relationships in AA much like you would in a church so yes, they feel responsibility to those relationships. As you yourself said, many people leave AA to choose another type of recovery or go back to drinking.

AA isn't out there seeking people out. AA is not affiliated with any sect, denominition, politic or organization. It does not endorse nor oppose any causes. It is a program of attraction rather than promotion.

AA does not gain anything financially or otherwise from treatment centers or the justice system. These facilities CHOOSE to use the 12 step model because obviously they see it as the most helpful way for people to get sober.

Side Note ...

These are people's LIVES you are talking about here. By telling this woman above me that it is a cult and she should avoid it for her child you could be putting someone's LIFE at risk. Let someone choose for themselves. If they think it is a cult and make the decision not to go than that is your opinion. Addiction is a LIFE or DEATH matter, not some forum to vent your resentment.

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#15 May 20, 2011
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
Have you ever spent significant time in AA?
Yes. I was indoctrinated into the 12-step religion at the age of 10 and basically involved into my late thirties. My story is here:
http://www.topix.com/forum/health/alcoholism/...
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
You are sorely misinformed.
So you claim, prove it.
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
AA members actually pick out all sorts of faults with Bill W.(ie: he cheated on his wife, he was arrogant, he could not have come up with the ideas for AA on his own, he borrowed much of the program from the Oxford Group etc., etc.)
All of those things are true. Do they not bother you? Do they not raise huge red flags? Bill Wilson was a scumbag.
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
No one feels pressure to stay in AA.
You've got to be joking. AA members regularly declare that without AA they would die in a gutter, or if you prefer, would be faced with "jails, institutions and death". You are really full of minimization and denial.
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
People form relationships in AA much like you would in a church so yes, they feel responsibility to those relationships. As you yourself said, many people leave AA to choose another type of recovery or go back to drinking.
Many of those people are worse off for getting involved. AA offers a lot of self-fulfilling prophecy, and causes many to drink to bigger excess when they do resume drinking.
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
AA isn't out there seeking people out. AA is not affiliated with any sect, denominition, politic or organization. It does not endorse nor oppose any causes. It is a program of attraction rather than promotion.
Bullsh*t. That line just allows AA's central office to disown any responsibility when the more dogmatic groups full of sexual predators are exposed. The courts force AA on people daily, and those that seek treatment are almost always shoved into to AA for a lofty fee paid for by themselves or the insurance companies. Furthermore, the treatment centers and court-forced outpatient programs are largely staffed by 12 steppers who have no other qualification than some time in the cult.
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
AA does not gain anything financially or otherwise from treatment centers or the justice system.
It gains members. Street AA is free but even the basket donations go largely toward paying some very lofty salaries in New York's central office.
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
These facilities CHOOSE to use the 12 step model because obviously they see it as the most helpful way for people to get sober.
They may "see it" as such but isn't true. The evidence states otherwise.
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
Side Note ...
These are people's LIVES you are talking about here. By telling this woman above me that it is a cult and she should avoid it for her child you could be putting someone's LIFE at risk.
The evidence shows AA does not help people and puts them at higher risks in multiple capacities. I would be more likely to save her life.
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
Let someone choose for themselves. If they think it is a cult and make the decision not to go than that is your opinion. Addiction is a LIFE or DEATH matter, not some forum to vent your resentment.
I agree, it is a life and death matter and all of the misinformation out there is harming people. Sounds like you're the one venting resentments...of hearing the truth. I will never stop telling the truth about Alcoholic's Anonymous.
RIP Pleasure Beach

Fairfield, CT

#16 May 20, 2011
Headhunter 300M wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes. I was indoctrinated into the 12-step religion at the age of 10 and basically involved into my late thirties. My story is here:
http://www.topix.com/forum/health/alcoholism/...
<quoted text>
So you claim, prove it.
<quoted text>
All of those things are true. Do they not bother you? Do they not raise huge red flags? Bill Wilson was a scumbag.
<quoted text>
You've got to be joking. AA members regularly declare that without AA they would die in a gutter, or if you prefer, would be faced with "jails, institutions and death". You are really full of minimization and denial.
<quoted text>
Many of those people are worse off for getting involved. AA offers a lot of self-fulfilling prophecy, and causes many to drink to bigger excess when they do resume drinking.
<quoted text>
Bullsh*t. That line just allows AA's central office to disown any responsibility when the more dogmatic groups full of sexual predators are exposed. The courts force AA on people daily, and those that seek treatment are almost always shoved into to AA for a lofty fee paid for by themselves or the insurance companies. Furthermore, the treatment centers and court-forced outpatient programs are largely staffed by 12 steppers who have no other qualification than some time in the cult.
<quoted text>
It gains members. Street AA is free but even the basket donations go largely toward paying some very lofty salaries in New York's central office.
<quoted text>
They may "see it" as such but isn't true. The evidence states otherwise.
<quoted text>
The evidence shows AA does not help people and puts them at higher risks in multiple capacities. I would be more likely to save her life.
<quoted text>
I agree, it is a life and death matter and all of the misinformation out there is harming people. Sounds like you're the one venting resentments...of hearing the truth. I will never stop telling the truth about Alcoholic's Anonymous.
You believe whatever you would like.
You sound slightly paranoid.
Arguing here is clearly futile.

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#17 May 20, 2011
RIP Pleasure Beach wrote:
<quoted text>
You believe whatever you would like.
You sound slightly paranoid.
Arguing here is clearly futile.
I believe that which is backed by evidence. Claiming that AA works is not. Neither is the claim that I'm potentially harming people by telling the truth about it.
I am not paranoid. Arguing is futile if you don't plan to back up any of your claims and ignore my responses. If you can prove anything I say as incorrect, please do. Have a great day.
Kelli

Cocoa, FL

#18 May 20, 2011
Headhunter 300M wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes. I was indoctrinated into the 12-step religion at the age of 10 and basically involved into my late thirties. My story is here:
http://www.topix.com/forum/health/alcoholism/...
<quoted text>
So you claim, prove it.
<quoted text>
All of those things are true. Do they not bother you? Do they not raise huge red flags? Bill Wilson was a scumbag.
<quoted text>
You've got to be joking. AA members regularly declare that without AA they would die in a gutter, or if you prefer, would be faced with "jails, institutions and death". You are really full of minimization and denial.
<quoted text>
Many of those people are worse off for getting involved. AA offers a lot of self-fulfilling prophecy, and causes many to drink to bigger excess when they do resume drinking.
<quoted text>
Bullsh*t. That line just allows AA's central office to disown any responsibility when the more dogmatic groups full of sexual predators are exposed. The courts force AA on people daily, and those that seek treatment are almost always shoved into to AA for a lofty fee paid for by themselves or the insurance companies. Furthermore, the treatment centers and court-forced outpatient programs are largely staffed by 12 steppers who have no other qualification than some time in the cult.
<quoted text>
It gains members. Street AA is free but even the basket donations go largely toward paying some very lofty salaries in New York's central office.
<quoted text>
They may "see it" as such but isn't true. The evidence states otherwise.
<quoted text>
The evidence shows AA does not help people and puts them at higher risks in multiple capacities. I would be more likely to save her life.
<quoted text>
I agree, it is a life and death matter and all of the misinformation out there is harming people. Sounds like you're the one venting resentments...of hearing the truth. I will never stop telling the truth about Alcoholic's Anonymous.
I read your life story ,and it honestly sounds to me like you were raised in a cult,I think you are scared emotionally because you were raised in a confusing home enviroment. I dont want that to sound insulting But from what you said your parents had addiction issues and as we know with an addict it is all or nothing and sounds like your parents really took it a little to far. I have three children and I have been upfront and honest with what has been going on in my life but would I ever drag them to a meeting,hell no. My recovery is up to me and I need my families support and I have that but it is up to me to do it and yes for me the only way that has worked is keeping that close network of people I call friends not members of a cult close to me. and all that means is going to a few meetings a week if I chose and probably going out after wards with people I call my friends and actually enjoying life sober. I am sorry your parents seemed to have robed you of some part of your childhood by pushing AA on you because the reality is AA safes lives but it is for adults with some seriouse issues not a child or even a teenager unless of course that teenager needs it. Dont take these comments the wrong way I think if you admit it you are probably a little upset inside for having AA pushed on you, I cant even imagine having meetings in my home for my children to hear all of our horrible stories or asking my child to stuff envelopes with AA literatue on it. I know you re reading this and are mad but that says something in itself. Good luck and I pray you find God for your wife and children.
RIP Pleasure Beach

Fairfield, CT

#19 May 23, 2011
Headhunter 300M wrote:
<quoted text>
I believe that which is backed by evidence. Claiming that AA works is not. Neither is the claim that I'm potentially harming people by telling the truth about it.
I am not paranoid. Arguing is futile if you don't plan to back up any of your claims and ignore my responses. If you can prove anything I say as incorrect, please do. Have a great day.
Faith has no "evidence" written in stone either, but for many people it works.

Who honestly cares if there is a scientific theorem or a mathematical equation proving or disproving the success rate of people's beliefs?

There really is no way to measure the success rate of people in an anonymous program. AA itself has admitted that. But at the same time, people in AA do not worship Bill Wilson as a profit, that is just plain and simply WRONG.

Neither does AA fund any treatment centers. Again, just WRONG.

You are just WRONG about a lot of things. I would never force AA on you so don't force your opinion on others and call it fact.

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#20 May 23, 2011
Kelli wrote:
<quoted text>
I read your life story ,and it honestly sounds to me like you were raised in a cult,I think you are scared emotionally because you were raised in a confusing home enviroment. I dont want that to sound insulting But from what you said your parents had addiction issues and as we know with an addict it is all or nothing and sounds like your parents really took it a little to far.
Way too far.
Kelli wrote:
<quoted text>I have three children and I have been upfront and honest with what has been going on in my life but would I ever drag them to a meeting,hell no.
Glad to hear that.
Kelli wrote:
<quoted text>My recovery is up to me and I need my families support and I have that but it is up to me to do it and yes for me the only way that has worked is keeping that close network of people I call friends not members of a cult close to me. and all that means is going to a few meetings a week if I chose and probably going out after wards with people I call my friends and actually enjoying life sober.
I don't wish to demean that or take away from it, and I think that having a support system is great. If AA would stop there, it might actually help people in the long term.
Kelli wrote:
<quoted text>I am sorry your parents seemed to have robed you of some part of your childhood by pushing AA on you because the reality is AA safes lives
No, that is not reality. That is propoganda. With no success rate above spontaneous remission, there is no evidence that AA saves lives.
Kelli wrote:
<quoted text> but it is for adults with some seriouse issues not a child or even a teenager unless of course that teenager needs it.


Who's to decide if a teenager (or an adult) "needs" it? Too often it's the courts. I think without the coersive recruiting it would wither and die. As far as people voluntary attending, I really don't concern myself as long they aren't recruiting others by spreading misinformation and with the help of the legal system and medical community.
Kelli wrote:
<quoted text>Dont take these comments the wrong way I think if you admit it you are probably a little upset inside for having AA pushed on you, I cant even imagine having meetings in my home for my children to hear all of our horrible stories or asking my child to stuff envelopes with AA literatue on it. I know you re reading this and are mad but that says something in itself. Good luck and I pray you find God for your wife and children.
I am not mad at your remarks. I encourage discussion. You seem like a nice person.

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