Number Of US Farms Declines, Farmers ...

Number Of US Farms Declines, Farmers Getting Older

There are 9 comments on the CBS Local story from Feb 20, 2014, titled Number Of US Farms Declines, Farmers Getting Older. In it, CBS Local reports that:

The number of U.S. farms is declining even as the value of their crops and livestock has increased over the past five years, a government census of American agriculture released Thursday says.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at CBS Local.

Whatsapp duck

Da Nang, Vietnam

#1 Feb 21, 2014
whats John Deers age???;-000

“Headed toward the cliff”

Since: Nov 07

Tawas City, Michigan

#2 Feb 21, 2014
Big agribusiness is taking over family farms and replacing them with factory farms.

And you morons wonder why there are constant recalls for contaminated meat & eggs & produce.

Thankfully my hens are laying now, so I'll never have to buy another crappy factory farmed egg.

“Voters elect Big Bird”

Since: Jan 07

Dump American Eagle

#3 Feb 21, 2014
WeTheSheeple wrote:
Big agribusiness is taking over family farms and replacing them with factory farms.
And you morons wonder why there are constant recalls for contaminated meat & eggs & produce.
Thankfully my hens are laying now, so I'll never have to buy another crappy factory farmed egg.
Were they young poults that finally matured,or did they stop laying as winter came in? If the later you might try using a lamp in the coop. Chicken laying cycles are regulated by length of day. As days shorten in the fall they can stop laying for the winter. Put a lamp in the coop to increrase the amount of "daylight" they see and they should lay year round.

“Headed toward the cliff”

Since: Nov 07

Tawas City, Michigan

#4 Feb 21, 2014
okimar wrote:
<quoted text>Were they young poults that finally matured,or did they stop laying as winter came in? If the later you might try using a lamp in the coop. Chicken laying cycles are regulated by length of day. As days shorten in the fall they can stop laying for the winter. Put a lamp in the coop to increrase the amount of "daylight" they see and they should lay year round.
They were young pullets that started laying late last fall.

I don't use a light in the coop due to the risk of fire. I've seen too many coops burn to the ground.

“Voters elect Big Bird”

Since: Jan 07

Dump American Eagle

#5 Feb 21, 2014
WeTheSheeple wrote:
<quoted text>
They were young pullets that started laying late last fall.
I don't use a light in the coop due to the risk of fire. I've seen too many coops burn to the ground.
You don';t leave the light on constantly. Use it as a kinda sunlight "suppliment". Have it on a switch you can turn on/of. Turn it on say,around 0500am and when the sun rises turn it off. Or if you are a late riser (or work days) you might turn it on in the late afternoon until say late evening-8:00pm. AQs long as they recieve 12-1r4 hours of light they should continue to lay.

We used to raise birds for eggs/4H with our you ngest. My wife and I both are farm raised and have our own now. We've done chickens,rabbits and calves. I really like to find a few piglets to raise/fatten for this coming year. But pig farmers are in short supply these days. Used to be,almost every farm had a few pigs. But gov't regs and the increase in factory farms have almost killed that segment of the ":family" farm off. I am looking at goats/meat sheep. There is a coming market for them in the Islamic community on their Holy days when a sacdrifice is needed. Not to mention I'll be enjoying lamb/mutton at MY leisure rather than if/when the local store carries it. Not to mention the cost.

Good luck with the nbirds... What breed are they,BTW? We have done Bantam Duckwings. Gold and Silver asw well as Aracona and Buff Orphingtons(my favorites).

“Headed toward the cliff”

Since: Nov 07

Tawas City, Michigan

#6 Feb 21, 2014
okimar wrote:
<quoted text>You don';t leave the light on constantly. Use it as a kinda sunlight "suppliment". Have it on a switch you can turn on/of. Turn it on say,around 0500am and when the sun rises turn it off. Or if you are a late riser (or work days) you might turn it on in the late afternoon until say late evening-8:00pm. AQs long as they recieve 12-1r4 hours of light they should continue to lay.
We used to raise birds for eggs/4H with our you ngest. My wife and I both are farm raised and have our own now. We've done chickens,rabbits and calves. I really like to find a few piglets to raise/fatten for this coming year. But pig farmers are in short supply these days. Used to be,almost every farm had a few pigs. But gov't regs and the increase in factory farms have almost killed that segment of the ":family" farm off. I am looking at goats/meat sheep. There is a coming market for them in the Islamic community on their Holy days when a sacdrifice is needed. Not to mention I'll be enjoying lamb/mutton at MY leisure rather than if/when the local store carries it. Not to mention the cost.
Good luck with the nbirds... What breed are they,BTW? We have done Bantam Duckwings. Gold and Silver asw well as Aracona and Buff Orphingtons(my favorites).
They seem to be laying fine without the supplemental light. I may be overly cautious, but any electricity in the coop is a fire hazard with all the dust & bedding etc. They seem to do fine even with the sub-zero winter we've been having, thought they do NOT like the snow. They won't venture far from the coop unless I clear a spot down to the ground.

I've got a Bhrama, Dominique, Welsummer, Barnavelder, New Hampshire, & an "Easter Egger". I get about 2 dozen eggs a week.

“Voters elect Big Bird”

Since: Jan 07

Dump American Eagle

#7 Feb 21, 2014
WeTheSheeple wrote:
<quoted text>
They seem to be laying fine without the supplemental light. I may be overly cautious, but any electricity in the coop is a fire hazard with all the dust & bedding etc. They seem to do fine even with the sub-zero winter we've been having, thought they do NOT like the snow. They won't venture far from the coop unless I clear a spot down to the ground.
I've got a Bhrama, Dominique, Welsummer, Barnavelder, New Hampshire, & an "Easter Egger". I get about 2 dozen eggs a week.
Your "Easter egg " chickens are Araconas,from South America. 99% of domestic fowl come from Asia and Europe. No one YET can determine where the Aracanas came from. Yet the Incas had them when the Spanish arrived....Go Figure...... Their eggs range from a coral to a pale blue/green. hence the name "Easter egg"chickens. The yolk is a richer source of protein,compared to other species. If you have a surplus of eggs you can command premium prices in an organic farmers' market. You have to be careful tho of where they roam,and what you feed them. Chickens are omnivorous(they will eat ANYTHING including each other,if injured/wounded). Any table scraps will be immediatly scratched tru and devoured.

Suggestion: Rather than "shelving" or a ledge for them to roost on consider a ladder type of roost system for them. The ledge or shlf nis good for n est boxes to lay i buit roosting is a horse of a different color. When cold,they will roost real close. A box doesnt allow this closeness for warmth sharing.

Again,good luck with the birds. I've raised them off/on for over 40 years.; They are fun and productive.

“Headed toward the cliff”

Since: Nov 07

Tawas City, Michigan

#8 Feb 21, 2014
okimar wrote:
<quoted text>Your "Easter egg " chickens are Araconas,from South America. 99% of domestic fowl come from Asia and Europe. No one YET can determine where the Aracanas came from. Yet the Incas had them when the Spanish arrived....Go Figure...... Their eggs range from a coral to a pale blue/green. hence the name "Easter egg"chickens. The yolk is a richer source of protein,compared to other species. If you have a surplus of eggs you can command premium prices in an organic farmers' market. You have to be careful tho of where they roam,and what you feed them. Chickens are omnivorous(they will eat ANYTHING including each other,if injured/wounded). Any table scraps will be immediatly scratched tru and devoured.
Suggestion: Rather than "shelving" or a ledge for them to roost on consider a ladder type of roost system for them. The ledge or shlf nis good for n est boxes to lay i buit roosting is a horse of a different color. When cold,they will roost real close. A box doesnt allow this closeness for warmth sharing.
Again,good luck with the birds. I've raised them off/on for over 40 years.; They are fun and productive.
I just use 2x2s for roosts and old milk crates for nesting boxes. I've got 3 identical nest boxes but they almost always use just the one box- I've even caught 2 hens crowded into the same box with a 3rd standing on the edge waiting to get in!

My Easter Egger has the full beard & muffs and lays pale green eggs. I know she's really just a "mutt", but she's one of my favorites.

Since: Apr 07

Location hidden

#9 Feb 22, 2014
Whatsapp duck wrote:
whats John Deers age???;-000
Not as much as Old MacDonald.

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