Volcanic eruptions in India, not meteorite, killed dinosaurs

There are 20 comments on the Newkerala.com story from Dec 9, 2012, titled Volcanic eruptions in India, not meteorite, killed dinosaurs. In it, Newkerala.com reports that:

Volcanic activity from the Deccan Traps in India, not a meteorite impact, may have killed the dinosaurs, according to a new study.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Newkerala.com.

litesong

Lynnwood, WA

#83 Jan 6, 2013
Rexby wrote:
......pin your head!!!
Ya have ta pin its butt, if you really want to kill it.
Rexby

Honolulu, HI

#84 Jan 6, 2013
litesong wrote:
<quoted text>
Ya have ta pin its butt, if you really want to kill it.
Pin the butt!!!
litesong

Lynnwood, WA

#85 Jan 6, 2013
litesong wrote:
Ya have ta pin its('phud feces face') butt, if you really want to kill it.
//////////
Rexby wrote:
Pin the butt!!!
//////////
litesong wrote:
Yeah, that's where 'phud feces face' keeps its small, minimally functioning brain. Just pin it good. If you miss the brain, it'll keep fluttering for a while.
Rexby

Honolulu, HI

#86 Jan 6, 2013
litesong wrote:
litesong wrote:
Ya have ta pin its('phud feces face') butt, if you really want to kill it.
//////////
Rexby wrote:
Pin the butt!!!
//////////
litesong wrote:
Yeah, that's where 'phud feces face' keeps its small, minimally functioning brain. Just pin it good. If you miss the brain, it'll keep fluttering for a while.
Pin his fat butt!!!
PHD

Overton, TX

#87 Jan 7, 2013
pinheadlitesout wrote:
litesong wrote:
Ya have ta pin my('pinheadlitesout') butt, if you really want to kill it.
//////////
Rexby wrote:
Pin the butt!!!
//////////
pinheadlitesout wrote:
Yeah, that's where I 'pinheadlitesout' keeps its small, minimally functioning brain. Just pin it good. If you miss the brain, it'll keep fluttering for a while.
There you have it "pinheadlitesout at best.
PHD

Overton, TX

#88 Jan 7, 2013
Rexby wrote:
<quoted text> Pin his fat butt!!!
That would be its butt buddies jog spacedoutblues."pinheadli tesout" and spacedoutblues like it roasty toasty.
Zero Percent Wrong

Doha, Qatar

#89 Jan 7, 2013
litesong wrote:
Ya have ta pin its('phud feces face') butt, if you really want to kill it.
[QUOTE who="Rexby"]
Pin the butt!!!
[QUOTE who="litesong"]
Yeah, that's where 'phud feces face' keeps its small, minimally functioning brain. Just pin it good. If you miss the brain, it'll keep fluttering for a while.
Why can't you quote like this, seriously?
PHD

Overton, TX

#90 Jan 7, 2013
Zero Percent Wrong wrote:
<quoted text>Why can't you quote like this, seriously?
Well "pinheadlitesout" can't quote anything do to its peanut brain. The "pinheadlitesout" has nothing but fiction and zero fact. If you buck the “pinheadlitesout" it will find some no brain response. If you post long enough then the "pinheadlitesout butt buddy spacedoutblues will soon join it with its useless babble. Good luck.

“Geologist [I'm Climate Change]”

Since: Mar 07

formerly Nuneaton

#91 Jan 7, 2013
Balaur wrote:
<quoted text>
The dominant of fern spores does suggest something killed off all plants, frogs no matter how big are affected by cold climate because that doesn't change the fact that they're cold blooded.
Ferns dominated the immediate aftermath for 2 reasons.

reason 1.
Ferns propagate by spores and are the largest spore based colonisers in most areas. The immediate aftermath of the event would have produced wide areas of denuded land and relatively bare soil with also as a result of the cooling from hot to warm climate mode#3 during the dust phase, an extensive rainfall, enabling ample water droplets to enable sporophyte (the big ferny bit), growth from the initial prothallus without it drying out.

Reason 2.
Ferns are typically forest understorey or epiphyte species and are generally shade resistant. During the "dust in orbit" stage, with the sun just emergent and heavy shading on land, the forest floor shade resistant species would have flourished without incurring a sunburn.
This same effect may be one of the reasons for the dominance of a small species of marine foramanifera in the paper based on the start of the forum thread, likely adapted to deepwater shade resistant plankton (the 1st to flourish in the marine environment)...

Many of the initial plant species survivors of the immediate impact that emerged from seed or suckers from old growth rootstocks may not have survived the heavy shade during the dust in orbit stage. This may have been the cause of extinction for example of the desert adapted cycadeoids, which appeared to have an ability to withstand extended periods of drought dormancy.

Other plant species of the post impact stage may have been shade resistant but lost their insect pollinatiors during the 6 months or so of darkness, and the time taken to re grow to flowering size.

Frogs.

Frogs are adapted to numerous habitats, most of which are moist for at least some part of a year. They definitely do NOT need to be warm, frogs are found in tundra habitat for example. During the latest K climate mode#3 they would largely have been found in areas around the arctic & antarctic circle where the temperate ring rainbelt happened to be @ the time. A 2nd set of species with partial drought adapt would have inhabited the equator, and some desert adapts would have filled the areas immediately near the equator, riverine tropics and immediately tropic side of the temperate rainbelt.
Frogs are predators of detritivores and would not have starved out during the aftermath (bugs a plenty). The equatorial survivors that avoided direct blast would have been rained on rather more often and slightly cooler. The temperate and upper tropic adapys would also have been rained on. As the oceanic heatsink would have dominated the temperatures it would likely have never reached freezing point anywhere except the immediate polar high pressure cells in midwinter in the first few aftermath years. The comment of frogs & the time on water levels underfoot in the rainbelt would have been "Knee deep". Some may have drowned but none would have dried out.

Have a nice day: Ag

“Geologist [I'm Climate Change]”

Since: Mar 07

formerly Nuneaton

#92 Jan 7, 2013
Spino guy wrote:
And isn't there also a video that proves one asteroid hit earth, that there was massive fires and a deep freeze to kill the dinosaurs.What really happened to the dinosaurs video, is a new video of what might happened to the dinosaurs.The one astroid hit earth video proves as much evidence of what really happened to the dinosaurs and that video came out before what really happened to the dinosaurs,so the more new evidence is what you believe.
Do you people realize how much i know about dinosaurs.
Remove the freze bit.

The ice ages were Pleistocene (about 2.2Ma to the present).

During the CO2 poor stages of the Jurassic & early K there may have been a winter frost under the climate mode#3 polar high pressure cell in wintertime and on the tops of VERY high mountains.
Climate mode#3 is ocean moderated and will generally completely ignore scattered continents, with very much the same weather per latitude anywhere on earth. This runs as follows per hemisphere...

Equatorial rainbelt (somewhat sparse)
E.Travelling monsoonal root & W.travelling tropical stormbelt.
Occasional monsoonal flow & recurving (E.Poleward) tropical storm belt.
Semi desert drought & monsoonal squall line flood belt (a wide area).
Warm temperate squall line and frontal belt.
Temperate rainbelt (very wet as in UK in December 2012).
Polar temperate rainbelt (cool wet drizzly & cold fronts).
polar high pressure cell (cool, often dark, summer drizzle).

The only effect of cooling would be a shift of latitude of each belt toward the equator, and expansion of the polar high pressure cell to fill the gap. The effect of the then ongoing Deccan traps CO" output would be the fact that the mode was running VERY hot and the polar high pressure cell was likely only visible in wintertime pre impact. Post impact it may have been wide enough to be dry (with a light frost in winter).

Have a nice day: Ag

ps.
Most of the recorded dinos were adapts to the wide semi desrt tropics region with occasional squall line floods along with the drought. This area of loose soil sparse well spaced out desert vegetation & flash floods led to most of the fossil burials found in the record, some of which were flood washout disasterpieces with several migratory species present in the washout debris of normal dino time.
The feathered & also the migratory dinos would be the temperate rainbelt adapts, they would not preserve easily as the bones would have been munched, dissolved or grown on by large plants.
PHD

Overton, TX

#93 Jan 7, 2013
Nice but does anybody really really know?

“Geologist [I'm Climate Change]”

Since: Mar 07

formerly Nuneaton

#94 Jan 7, 2013
PHD wrote:
Nice but does anybody really really know?
Would need either a Tardis machine, or publication of a book by scientists covering all 3 disciplines (physics, chemistry, biology), and of course time; (relatively easy).

The would require readers with degrees in the same science disciplines to understand the results of the publications; (difficult).

Have a nice day: Ag

ps.

Also awaiting the results of the large mammal mass extinction studies that resulted from the major impacts in Chesapeake bay, and Popigai (siberia), during the mid tertiary.
For the record, the climate mode @ that time was also mode#3 but a bit cooler than the late K timespan as there were no ongiong basalt plateau eruptions. Currently the results are noticeable by their absence.
PHD

Overton, TX

#95 Jan 7, 2013
Adrian Godsafe MSc wrote:
<quoted text>
Would need either a Tardis machine, or publication of a book by scientists covering all 3 disciplines (physics, chemistry, biology), and of course time; (relatively easy).
The would require readers with degrees in the same science disciplines to understand the results of the publications; (difficult).
Have a nice day: Ag
ps.
Also awaiting the results of the large mammal mass extinction studies that resulted from the major impacts in Chesapeake bay, and Popigai (siberia), during the mid tertiary.
For the record, the climate mode @ that time was also mode#3 but a bit cooler than the late K timespan as there were no ongiong basalt plateau eruptions. Currently the results are noticeable by their absence.
That would require a scientist to make corrections to their errors to find more errors so they can discover that their corrections were in error covering all 3 disciplines. You have a better day!
SwagA5

United States

#96 Jan 7, 2013
Poor little rexby !
Bazza

UK

#97 Jan 7, 2013
Coprolite1 wrote:
<quoted text>
Global warming is a natural fluctuation of the climate that has gone from day one. Humans have some but little to do with it.
And Spino guy how do you know what I do?
Global warming has occurred many many times on this planet, it's the planets natural cycle - Nothing to do with humans lol
PHD

Overton, TX

#98 Jan 7, 2013
Global warming cooling climate change occurs daily on this planet. Depending on who receives the money dictates how warm cool climate will be for the day?
litesong

Lynnwood, WA

#99 Jan 7, 2013
phud feces face wrote:

.....litesong can't quote anything do(sic) to its peanut brain.
..... butt buddy.....
"phud feces face" loves to demean people while misspelling.
"phud feces face" continues to think anally, as the name he chose, suggests.
Nathan

Tokyo, Japan

#100 Jan 8, 2013
no way !!!
what nonsense !!!
PHD

Overton, TX

#101 Jan 8, 2013
pinheadlitesout wrote:
<quoted text>
I"pinheadlitesout" loves to demean people while misspelling.
I"pinheadliteout" continues to think with my anal ability, as the name I chose, suggests as well as my actions.
Yes we know you like to do that butt thing.I return your answers in kind.Maybe that eruption from your back side killed all those dinosaurs.
Rexby

Honolulu, HI

#102 Jan 8, 2013
Police! There goes that thief PHD again! Pin his fat butt!

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