DA Alex Hunter deceived the public.

Posted in the JonBenet Ramsey Forum

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Since: Feb 12

Honolulu, HI

#1 Jan 31, 2013
I am not sure what can be done about this lying coward, but here it is:
http://www.nowpublic.com/world/jonbenet-ramse...

There should be an avenue of justice for this. Hunter did not do the job he was sworn in to do. He used deceptive words to make it look like the GJ voted NOT to indict.

We, the public, should be demanding his hide.
CC
candy

East Lansing, MI

#2 Jan 31, 2013
He's at least 77, with his second bout of cancer. He had two families, his younger family, he had two children with his present wife Margie, a doctor, one of whom was a son one year older than JonBenet, who Alex was very closed to named John Hunter-Hawke. He accidently OD's just weeks from his 21st birthday a few years ago. He stole some of his Dad's oxycontin, crushed the oxycontin, which you are not supposed to do, which drug abusers do do, because you get all the effects of the time released pain drug at once. He had 2 40 ounce beers at a party with 2 friends, the oxycontin he snorted, and some pot, and he died sometime in the night.

When I first came on this case, it was specifically because the grand jury did not indict, and I wanted to find out why on the internet. The media I had followed the case in, the mainstream media, Larry King, Geraldo, Time, Newsweek, People and the tabloids all didn't tell me why. So I came looking for answers after the grand jury. I met Masked Man right away, and he told me about Cybersleuths, and the other forums. Cybersleuths had the best archives that were all about Hunter, and the time of the grand jury, so I learned a tremendous amount about that time. Also, the owner, Skydog, lived in Boulder, as did Masked Man, Mame and other posters. Bottom line, Hunter had not tried a case since 1986 when the Ramsey case came along, he had lost that case, and had delegated authority in that office to Bill Wise for most things, and Pete Hofstrom for the violent felony offenders. Boulder had and has a historically low crime rate, and his plea bargains didn't make anyone unhappy enough not to vote for him. He had a terrible track record with homicides, and first threw the Sid Wells case, and then the one, as Super Dave said, he couldn't sweep under the carpet because it was too big, the JonBenet Ramsey case. It's awful to hear what he did, devastating, but everyone knew he could not have tried what would be a case as big as OJ in theis country. They had to bring in a grand jury specialist just to handle the grand jury, Mike Kane. So it's just a tragedy that a weak DA like him was there when this and the Sid Wells case before it happened.
candy

East Lansing, MI

#3 Jan 31, 2013
On the day the grand jury didn't indict, that day of October 13, 1999, I will never forget that beautiful day as Charlie described, the crisp, sunny fall day was the same weather here in Michigan. I read the forums in devastation that night, looking for answers, and everyone on our RDI side blamed Hunter, EVERYONE, no one else, NOT Mike Kane who ran the grand jury. As you can imagine, Hunter was a hero to the IDI's and they took his "no indictments" to mean there was no case against the Ramseys. To hear the truth of what he did, that they DID indict is just SO HURTFUL.

Since: Feb 12

Honolulu, HI

#5 Feb 1, 2013
Hi Candy,
Regardless of his age and his health, he owes the public an explanation for not doing the job he swore to do in his oath of taking office.

Hunter should be prosecuted for deceiving the public regardless of his, or anyone else's opinions, for not honoring the votes of the GJ.
CC
candy wrote:
He's at least 77, with his second bout of cancer. He had two families, his younger family, he had two children with his present wife Margie, a doctor, one of whom was a son one year older than JonBenet, who Alex was very closed to named John Hunter-Hawke. He accidently OD's just weeks from his 21st birthday a few years ago. He stole some of his Dad's oxycontin, crushed the oxycontin, which you are not supposed to do, which drug abusers do do, because you get all the effects of the time released pain drug at once. He had 2 40 ounce beers at a party with 2 friends, the oxycontin he snorted, and some pot, and he died sometime in the night.
When I first came on this case, it was specifically because the grand jury did not indict, and I wanted to find out why on the internet. The media I had followed the case in, the mainstream media, Larry King, Geraldo, Time, Newsweek, People and the tabloids all didn't tell me why. So I came looking for answers after the grand jury. I met Masked Man right away, and he told me about Cybersleuths, and the other forums. Cybersleuths had the best archives that were all about Hunter, and the time of the grand jury, so I learned a tremendous amount about that time. Also, the owner, Skydog, lived in Boulder, as did Masked Man, Mame and other posters. Bottom line, Hunter had not tried a case since 1986 when the Ramsey case came along, he had lost that case, and had delegated authority in that office to Bill Wise for most things, and Pete Hofstrom for the violent felony offenders. Boulder had and has a historically low crime rate, and his plea bargains didn't make anyone unhappy enough not to vote for him. He had a terrible track record with homicides, and first threw the Sid Wells case, and then the one, as Super Dave said, he couldn't sweep under the carpet because it was too big, the JonBenet Ramsey case. It's awful to hear what he did, devastating, but everyone knew he could not have tried what would be a case as big as OJ in theis country. They had to bring in a grand jury specialist just to handle the grand jury, Mike Kane. So it's just a tragedy that a weak DA like him was there when this and the Sid Wells case before it happened.

“May you all come home”

Since: Mar 07

safely Bless you all

#6 Feb 1, 2013
Bakatari wrote:
Hi Candy,
Regardless of his age and his health, he owes the public an explanation for not doing the job he swore to do in his oath of taking office.
Hunter should be prosecuted for deceiving the public regardless of his, or anyone else's opinions, for not honoring the votes of the GJ.
CC
<quoted text>
Excellent post CC and I totally agree. He is a PUBLIC servant and as such, took an oath of office to which he MUST adhere

It will be interesting to see if there is any fallout from this as there should be. Here is a chance for Garnett to show what he is made out of. We are told he is an excellent DA, honest, etc. and that remains to be seen and this incident and revelation will be the perfect opportunity for him to prove himself to those who elected him as well as the rest of the people who follow this case.
Heloise

UK

#7 Feb 1, 2013
Capricorn wrote:
<quoted text>
Excellent post CC and I totally agree. He is a PUBLIC servant and as such, took an oath of office to which he MUST adhere
It will be interesting to see if there is any fallout from this as there should be. Here is a chance for Garnett to show what he is made out of. We are told he is an excellent DA, honest, etc. and that remains to be seen and this incident and revelation will be the perfect opportunity for him to prove himself to those who elected him as well as the rest of the people who follow this case.
I agree, Cappy. I keep thinking back to that TV appearance where he was sitting smirking and just stopping short of ridiculing ST. He behaved like that knowing that ST had been right when he said that Hunter had perpetrated a fraud on the American public (and interested non-Americans :D )

Since: Feb 12

Honolulu, HI

#8 Feb 1, 2013
Heloise wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree, Cappy. I keep thinking back to that TV appearance where he was sitting smirking and just stopping short of ridiculing ST. He behaved like that knowing that ST had been right when he said that Hunter had perpetrated a fraud on the American public (and interested non-Americans :D )
Hi Heloise and Capricorn. On Hunter, and his oath in taking the office of the DA, I guess today, oaths are basically meaningless.

I am not a religious person, but all of the official oaths I took in my life, was before God. Although I am not religious, an oath before Got must mean more than just a promise. The oaths I mostly remember, are the one I took upon my enlistment in the US Army, and my Vows I made when my wife and I married 4+ decades ago.

I guess we all, and especially Alex Hunter, should look at the oath he took so many times while taking the office of DA.
CC

“May you all come home”

Since: Mar 07

safely Bless you all

#9 Feb 1, 2013
Bakatari wrote:
<quoted text>
Hi Heloise and Capricorn. On Hunter, and his oath in taking the office of the DA, I guess today, oaths are basically meaningless.
I am not a religious person, but all of the official oaths I took in my life, was before God. Although I am not religious, an oath before Got must mean more than just a promise. The oaths I mostly remember, are the one I took upon my enlistment in the US Army, and my Vows I made when my wife and I married 4+ decades ago.
I guess we all, and especially Alex Hunter, should look at the oath he took so many times while taking the office of DA.
CC
What a lovely sentiment CC

An oath is an oath and in the case of the DA and public servants who take them, the oath is not something to use flexibly.

It is MANDATORY to adhere to an oath when you are being PAID by those who gave you the privelege of taking it in the first place

Honesty is NOT optional
Heloise

UK

#10 Feb 2, 2013
Hi Bakatari and Cappy. I absolutely agree with both of you. When an oath is required and voluntarily taken, the individual is making a solemn promise to behave according to the edicts of his/her profession (or whatever).
I have wondered whether Hunter didn't actually think he was following his oath in this case? I think it was ST who said that Hunter and Hofstrom both thought that advancing society's interests was part of their duty. He felt that 'society's interests' was far too subjective an idea to guide a DA's office and that the law was all that Hunter should be following.

Since: Feb 12

Honolulu, HI

#11 Feb 2, 2013
Heloise wrote:
Hi Bakatari and Cappy. I absolutely agree with both of you. When an oath is required and voluntarily taken, the individual is making a solemn promise to behave according to the edicts of his/her profession (or whatever).
I have wondered whether Hunter didn't actually think he was following his oath in this case? I think it was ST who said that Hunter and Hofstrom both thought that advancing society's interests was part of their duty. He felt that 'society's interests' was far too subjective an idea to guide a DA's office and that the law was all that Hunter should be following.
Hi Heloise,
I don't think Hunter even thought about his oath when taking the action he did on the JB case, I think he was afraid of the mulch-million dollar war chest of the Ramsey's possible defense should this case go to trial, especially after the OJ Simpson verdict.
CC
candy

East Lansing, MI

#12 Oct 24, 2013
Of all the things I have read in the last few days, this is the most important to understanding the key players in the Hunter/Lacy DA's offices, and how they "threw" hard cases. Anyone reading this should know who everyone he is talking about is, IMO, to understand these DA's offices and how we came to the sorry mess where the Ramsey grand jury indictment is now only being opened 14 years later:

BPD_Fan 96p ∑ 8 hours ago
Hunter, Wise, Lacy, Nagel, Mallard, Hofstrom and Maguire are all responsible. The DA's office under Hunter/Lacy looked to get rid of cases, especially difficult cases. For example, Lacy's "chief trial deputy" had not gone to trial in over a decade when Stan Garnett took over. The place was a disgrace and everyone in the Lacy administration (including Judges Mallard and Langer) were part of the pathetic team. The Lacy team pushed the John Mark Carr theory, even though it was easily disproved.

http://www.dailycamera.com/news/ci_24369117/j...
Heloise

UK

#13 Oct 25, 2013
candy wrote:
Of all the things I have read in the last few days, this is the most important to understanding the key players in the Hunter/Lacy DA's offices, and how they "threw" hard cases. Anyone reading this should know who everyone he is talking about is, IMO, to understand these DA's offices and how we came to the sorry mess where the Ramsey grand jury indictment is now only being opened 14 years later:
BPD_Fan 96p ∑ 8 hours ago
Hunter, Wise, Lacy, Nagel, Mallard, Hofstrom and Maguire are all responsible. The DA's office under Hunter/Lacy looked to get rid of cases, especially difficult cases. For example, Lacy's "chief trial deputy" had not gone to trial in over a decade when Stan Garnett took over. The place was a disgrace and everyone in the Lacy administration (including Judges Mallard and Langer) were part of the pathetic team. The Lacy team pushed the John Mark Carr theory, even though it was easily disproved.
http://www.dailycamera.com/news/ci_24369117/j...
The bit about the chief trial deputy having avoided active court duty for ten years is staggering. Ten years? I wonder what exactly the citizenry of Boulder County paid him actually to do?

“WAX ON”

Since: Jul 10

WAX OFF

#14 Oct 25, 2013
It seems no one in Boulder was prosecuting anyone, it was all plea deals. I guess that kept it from being too messy.
Heloise wrote:
<quoted text>
The bit about the chief trial deputy having avoided active court duty for ten years is staggering. Ten years? I wonder what exactly the citizenry of Boulder County paid him actually to do?

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#15 Oct 25, 2013
Alex Hunter should be hung upside down from his balls in a 100 year old oak tree dressed like a beauty pageant princess.

His 'not' indiciting was passive, it didn't actively hurt anyone but there were things his office did during the course of the investigation that were aggressive in nature that were harmful. People that tried to help or volunteered with information had the tables turned on them and became the focus as suspects.

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#16 Oct 25, 2013
Any DA involved in witness intimidation should be prosecuted. It's so off course it's not within the realm of being given consideration.

Heloise

UK

#17 Oct 25, 2013
DrSeussMd wrote:
It seems no one in Boulder was prosecuting anyone, it was all plea deals. I guess that kept it from being too messy.
<quoted text>
Bizarre.

The scary thought is that, had Steve Thomas not been involved in the case, the DA's office's failings would probably have gone largely unnoticed and fewer people would have pursued justice from that angle. I don't imagine anything about this case could now make him happy but I hope he is taking comfort from the fact that his reservations about the DA's transparency have been publicly proven to be justified. It must be pleasing to know that, while he was excluded from the Grand Jury proceedings, the evidence he gathered must have been central to the indictment.

“WAX ON”

Since: Jul 10

WAX OFF

#18 Oct 25, 2013
I agree with you Heloise,

SThomas was seldom given the credit he deserved for the real reason he wrote his book. People just try and crucify him and demean him and make insinuations of how he gave up and how he settled and what a coward he was, and those are the people who miss the whole point of WHY he wrote his book. And also they are the people who feel they were shunned by him (no doubt for good reason as the years since have proven). SThomas was the biggest advocate for justice for JonBenet. It could not have been easy exposing Boulder for what it was, but he did it anyhow at great personal cost.
Heloise wrote:
<quoted text>
Bizarre.
The scary thought is that, had Steve Thomas not been involved in the case, the DA's office's failings would probably have gone largely unnoticed and fewer people would have pursued justice from that angle. I don't imagine anything about this case could now make him happy but I hope he is taking comfort from the fact that his reservations about the DA's transparency have been publicly proven to be justified. It must be pleasing to know that, while he was excluded from the Grand Jury proceedings, the evidence he gathered must have been central to the indictment.

Since: May 11

AOL

#19 Oct 25, 2013
DrSeussMd wrote:
I agree with you Heloise,
SThomas was seldom given the credit he deserved for the real reason he wrote his book. People just try and crucify him and demean him and make insinuations of how he gave up and how he settled and what a coward he was, and those are the people who miss the whole point of WHY he wrote his book. And also they are the people who feel they were shunned by him (no doubt for good reason as the years since have proven). SThomas was the biggest advocate for justice for JonBenet. It could not have been easy exposing Boulder for what it was, but he did it anyhow at great personal cost.
<quoted text>
I still can't believe this! Sticking the indictment in a safe until sol is up (and Lacy celebrated by writing her bogus letter of exoneration), is clearly the act of a DA hiding the truth. It's just like Beuf saying JB's med records were in HIS safe deposit box (instead of in the hands of investigators) and conveniently 'stolen'. Makes me sick..the whole lot of them.
Poor JonBenet. Not ONE person loved her:(

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#20 Oct 28, 2013
The clothing of Jessica Lundsford, Polly Klaas, and Danielle VanDam should be tested to show how common and expected unsourced specks of foreign, degraded, incomplete, touch DNA are. They are indigenous to the common materials and accessories of human life. It would in no way make their convicted murderers innocent. Itís a godsend those evil bastards do not have access to the money needed for such dna testing or a corrupt District attorney such as the Ramseys found with Mary Lacy to assist the prose$$.

Not only should the clothing of other victims be DNA tested to set standards - Mary Lacy and Alex Hunter should pay for it as restitution for their wrong doing.

“May you all come home”

Since: Mar 07

safely Bless you all

#21 Oct 28, 2013
realTopaz wrote:
<quoted text>
I still can't believe this! Sticking the indictment in a safe until sol is up (and Lacy celebrated by writing her bogus letter of exoneration), is clearly the act of a DA hiding the truth. It's just like Beuf saying JB's med records were in HIS safe deposit box (instead of in the hands of investigators) and conveniently 'stolen'. Makes me sick..the whole lot of them.
Poor JonBenet. Not ONE person loved her:(
You are so right. What Hunter did was Inexcusable and so very obvious in its corruption. Sadly, nothing was done about it then and people KNEW and nothing may come of it now

What is really UGLY is Lacy's love letter in the face of an indictment that was never enforced based on her desire to make her ill gotten gain of getting the DA position in the first place, her priority.

What is really even uglier is that in the face of the truth, there are still so many ready willing and able to apologize and protect those who prevent/ed justice for JBR

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