Carnes decision thread 3 - the ransom...

Carnes decision thread 3 - the ransom note

Posted in the JonBenet Ramsey Forum

Since: Jan 06

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#1 Jan 25, 2014
Carnes: II. The Ransom Note

The Ransom Note is believed by all parties to have been written by the killer or an accomplice of the killer and remains an extremely important clue in the murder investigation.(PSDMF 4.) Plaintiff claims that the single best piece of evidence that ties Mrs. Ramsey to the crime is the Ransom Note.(Id.) Mrs. Ramsey, however, flatly denies that she had anything to do with the note's creation.(SMF II189; PSMF 89.) Due to the pivotal role the Ransom Note plays in plaintiffs' allegation that Mrs. Ramsey was the murderer of her child, the facts surrounding the Ransom Note will be discussed in detail.

The Ransom Note was quite long, and in fact is one of the longest ransom notes in the history of kidnapping cases.(PSDMF 7.) This fact is important because the longer a document is, the harder it becomes to disguise one's handwriting.(PSDMF 9.) The Ransom Note is addressed to Mr. Ramsey alone and purports to be written by a group of individuals who "represent a small foreign faction" that have kidnapped defendants' daughter and seek $118,000 for her safe return. The Ransom Note was signed "S.B.T.C.", after the salutation "Victory!".(Ransom Note at 3.) The author of the Ransom Note instructs Mr. Ramsey to "[u]se that good southern [sic] common sense," an obviously inaccurate reference as Mr. Ramsey was originally from Michigan, whereas Mrs. Ramsey was originally from West Virginia.(Id.)


In addition, the Ransom Note was drafted on paper taken from the middle of a pad of paper located at defendants' home and with a pen found at defendants' home. Additional sheets were missing from the pad and were never located at defendants' home. The pen used to write the Ransom Note was sourced to defendants' home and found placed back in its normal place by the phone. Finally, there was another page in the pad that had written on it "Mr. and Mrs. I," which many believe to have been an early "false start" of the Ransom Note.(PSDMF 51.)

Both parties agree that the Ransom Note is not an ideal specimen for handwriting analysis, primarily due to the type of writing instrument, a broad fiber-tip pen, used to draft the note. This type of pen distorts and masks fine details to an extent not achievable by other types of pen, as for example a ball point pen.(SMF 243; PSMF 243.) In addition, the stroke direction used to construct certain letters and subtle handprinting features, such as hesitations and pen lifts, are difficult to ascertain because of the pen used in the Ransom Note.(SMF 244; PSMF 244.) Finally, the handwriting in the original Ransom Note showed consistency throughout the entire writing.(SMF 246; PSMF 246.) One of the most common means to disguise one's handwriting is to attempt to make the script erratic throughout the text. In sum, for the above reasons, the Ransom Note is not an ideal specimen for handwriting analysis. Nevertheless, the writer does not appear to have been trying to disguise his or her handwriting.

jameson's comment - nothing new here, hard to disguise 3 pages and those close to the investigation think historical examples of our killer's writing will match.

Since: Jan 06

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#2 Jan 25, 2014
During the investigation, the Boulder Police Department and Boulder County District Attorney's Office consulted at least six handwriting experts.(SMF 191; PSMF 191.) All of these experts consulted the original Ransom Note and original handwriting exemplars from Mrs. Ramsey.(SMF 205; PSMF 205.) Four of these experts were hired by the police and two were hired by defendants.(SMF 191; PSMF 191.) All six experts agreed that Mr. Ramsey could be eliminated as the author of the Ransom Note.(SMF 194; PSMF 194.) None of the six consulted experts identified Mrs. Ramsey as the author of the Ransom Note.(SMF 195; PSMF 195.) Rather, the experts' consensus was that she "probably did not" write the Ransom Note.(SMF 196; PSMF 196.)14 On a scale of one to five, with five being elimination as the author of the Ransom Note, the experts placed Mrs. Ramsey at a 4.5 or a 4.0.(SMF 203; PSMF 203.) The experts
[253 F.Supp.2d 1335]
described the chance of Mrs. Ramsey being the author of the Ransom Note as "very low." (SMF 204; PSMF 204.) The two experts hired by defendants both assert that this evidence strongly suggests that Mrs. Ramsey did not write the Note.(SMF 254.)
Plaintiff, however, asserts that his retained experts believe Mrs. Ramsey to be the author of the Ransom Note. Indeed, Gideon Epstein and Cina Wong, the handwriting experts proffered by plaintiff, opine that they are "100 percent certain" Mrs. Ramsey wrote the Ransom Note.(SMF 256; PSMF 256; PSDMF 1-2.) In contrast to the experts relied upon by defendants and by the Boulder Police Department, however, neither of these experts have ever seen or examined the original Ransom Note.(SMF 256; PSMF 256.) In fact, Mr. Epstein and Ms. Wong do not know what "generation" copy of the Ransom Note they examined.(SMF 257; PSMF 257.) Ms. Wong received her copy of the Ransom Note and certain writings alleged to be historical writings of Mrs. Ramsey from the tabloid, The National Enquirer.(SMF 258; PSMF 258.) Although it is widely considered "very important" to consult the original versions of writings when engaging in handwriting analysis, plaintiff asserts it was impossible for his experts to consult such materials because defendants failed to provide him with original exemplars.15 (PSMF 259-260.) Mr. Epstein, however, consulted with some of his peers, who concur with his analysis.16 Defendants' experts base their conclusion that Mrs. Ramsey is not the author of the Ransom Note on the "numerous significant dissimilarities" between the individual characteristics of Mrs. Ramsey's handprinting and of that used in the Ransom Note.(SMF f 247.) For example, defendants asserts Mrs. Ramsey's written letter "u" consistently differs from the way the same letter is written throughout the Ransom Note.(SMF 248.) Plaintiffs experts responds that this variation may be due to a conscious effort by Mrs. Ramsey to change her handwriting or to her heightened stress level.(PSMF 248.) In support of their conclusion that Mrs. Ramsey authored the Ransom Note, plaintiffs experts assert that there are similarities between letters found in the Ransom Note and exemplars and that the note contains proofreader marks 17 of the kind often used by newspaper reporters and journalists.(PSDMF 41.) Plaintiff also notes that Mrs. Ramsey was a journalism major in college.(PSDMF 42.)

Since: Jan 06

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#3 Jan 25, 2014
jameson's comment
Let me repeat : None of the six consulted experts identified Mrs. Ramsey as the author of the Ransom Note. Rather, the experts' consensus was that she "probably did not" write the Ransom Note. On a scale of one to five, with five being elimination as the author of the Ransom Note, the experts placed Mrs. Ramsey at a 4.5 or a 4.0. The experts described the chance of Mrs. Ramsey being the author of the Ransom Note as "very low."
Hardly what the BORG reports in the Ramesy discussion forums. But these are documented facts coing out of a federal lawsuit. Not to be ignored.

Since: Jan 06

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#4 Jan 25, 2014
Other experts believe the Ransom Note may have been authored by other people. In addition to Mrs. Ramsey, there were other individuals "under suspicion" who had their handwriting analyzed and who were not eliminated as the possible author of the Ransom Note.(SMF 205; PSMF 205.) For example, forensic document examiner Lloyd Cunningham cannot eliminate plaintiff as the author of the Ransom Note.(SMF 279; PSMF 279.) Plaintiffs exgirlfriend has also testified that she was "struck by how the handwriting in the note resembled [plaintiffs] own handwriting" and believes that he is the note's author.(J. Brungardt Aff. 43.) Further, to the extent that the use of a single editing mark might suggest to plaintiffs experts that Mrs. Ramsey was the author, given her bachelor's degree in journalism, one should also note that plaintiff, himself, has a Masters' degree in journalism.(Id. 13.)

jameson's comment - so Chris Wolf could not be cleared by handwriting. Interesting. He was cleared by the DNA, but not the handwriting. Just interesting. Remember, he has no alibi for that night.

Since: Jan 06

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#5 Jan 25, 2014
Carnes:
III. The Investigation of the Murder

At the time of JonBenet's murder, the Boulder Police Department had limited experience in conducting a murder investigation.(SMF 70; PSMF 70.) Commander Jon Eller was primarily responsible for the investigation, which was his first murder investigation.(SMF 67; PSMF 67.) One lead detective assigned to the case, Steven Thomas, had no prior experience with a murder investigation and had previously served as an undercover narcotics officer.(SMF 68; PSMF 68.) Finally, the officer who took charge of the investigation in October 1997, Mark Beckner, also had limited homicide experience.(SMF 69; PSMF 69.)

Many mistakes were made during the course of the investigation. For example, a series of events compromised the crime scene, as discussed supra. Moreover, the police did not request to interview defendants separately on the day that JonBenet's body was found.(SMF 57; PSMF 57.) They did, however, question defendants jointly at various times on December 26, 27 and 28, and, soon thereafter, began to focus the investigation on defendants as the main subjects.(SMF 54, 71-72; PSMF 54, 71-72.) Pursuant to the FBI's suggestion that the Boulder Police publicly name defendants as subjects and apply intense media pressure to them so that they would confess to the crime, the police released many statements that implied defendants were guilty and were not cooperating with police.(SMF 74-75; PSMF 74-75.) In addition to official police releases, many individual officers also released information about the investigation without official authorization, some of which disclosures were highly confidential and potentially undermined the investigation.

jameson's comments: This is the same kind of pressure the police put on Fleet White and his wife to get them to cooperate, possibly to get them to give up information incriminating to the Ramseys. Problem was, the Whites didn't have any information that would indicate the Ramseys did this. The pressure went on and the Whites were overwhelmed. That is what I was told by many close to the investigation. THat is NOT stated here but this is where I add my thoughts so.... jmo, my educated opinion. As the forums discuss Fleet and more facts come out about that couple, see if what I say makes sense. I think you will agree it does. The media was poison for the Whites and they responded in amazing ways. The stories made the papers, I couldn't make this stuff up.

Since: Jan 06

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#6 Jan 25, 2014
On Ramsey cooperation, this is in Carnes decision

"During the course of the investigation, defendants signed over one hundred releases for information requested by the police, and provided all evidence and information requested by the police.(SMF 61; PSMF 61.) Upon request, within days after the murder and in the months that followed, defendants provided the police with historical handwriting samples and supervised written exemplars.(SMF 55; PSMF 55.) Defendants also gave hair, including pubic hair, and DNA samples to the police.(SMF 56, 60; PSMF 56, 60.) Despite widespread criticism that defendants failed to cooperate in the murder investigation, defendants note that they agreed, on at least three occasions, to be interviewed separately by representatives of the police or the Boulder County District Attorney's Office.(SMF 62; PSMF 62.)"

jameson's comments - remember, these are undisputed facts. Posters here indicate those guilty parties wouldn't let LE see medical records and so on - but they are lying. The police spoke to the doctors, they had all the info they wanted. They just didn't like hearing how bland and normal and even NICE this family was. They wanted to scratch the surface and find monsters - that didn't happen.

Since: Jan 06

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#7 Jan 25, 2014
In March 1997, Andrew Louis Smit was hired by the Boulder District Attorney's Office due to his extensive experience as a homicide investigator for thirty years.(SMF 94; PSMF 94.) Detective Smit
[253 F.Supp.2d 1337]
is widely considered to be an expert investigator who has successfully cracked other child murder investigations.(See, e.g., SMF 94; PSMF 94; Hunter Dep. at 46-47; Steven Thomas, JonBenet: Inside the Ramsey Murder Investigation 167-169 (2001).) During the course of his tenure with the police department, Detective Smit became familiar with all aspects of the murder investigation.(SMF 95-96; PSMF 95-96.) He resigned from the investigation at some point in September 1998, however, because he felt that the Boulder Police Department refused to investigate leads that pointed to an intruder as the murderer of JonBenet, and instead insisted on focusing only on defendants as the culprits.(SMF 97, 101; PSMF 97, 101.) Two other men, Detective Steve Ainsworth and Assistant District Attorney Trip DeMuth, who also believed the evidence pointed toward an intruder as the killer, were soon thereafter removed from the investigation.(SMF 98-100; 102; PSMF 99-100; 102.)

In June 1998, the Boulder police presented their evidence to the Boulder County District Attorney.(SMF 84; PSMF 84.) At some point in the summer of 1998, then-District Attorney Alex Hunter decided to convene a grand jury to investigate the murder of JonBenet and possibly bring charges.(SMF 86; PSMF 86.) On October 13, 1999, the grand jury was discharged by District Attorney Hunter with no indictment issued.(SMF 91; PSMF 91.) The District Attorney, and all other prosecutors involved in the proceedings, believed at that time that there was insufficient evidence to bring charges against any person, including defendants, in connection with the murder.(SMF 91-92; PSMF 91-92.)

jameson's comment - reread this -- "The District Attorney, and all other prosecutors involved in the proceedings, believed at that time that there was insufficient evidence to bring charges against any person, including defendants, in connection with the murder."
and again
"The District Attorney, and all other prosecutors involved in the proceedings, believed at that time that there was insufficient evidence to bring charges against any person, including defendants, in connection with the murder. "

Since: Jan 06

Location hidden

#8 Jan 25, 2014
A bit on the Ramsey book

"Defendants' Book names five people, including plaintiff, whom defendants contend
[253 F.Supp.2d 1338]
should be further investigated.(SMF 328; PSMF 328.) For example, one lead mentioned is Michael Helgoth, a man who committed suicide two months after the murder and one day after District Attorney Hunter issued a statement that the authorities were narrowing their search for the murderer of JonBenet Ramsey.(SMF 281; PSMF 281.) Indeed, a stun gun was found near Mr. Helgoth's body, as well as boots with a HI-TEC logo like that left on the basement floor of defendants' home.(SMF 281; PSMF 281.) See discussion supra at 1332, 1333.

Another lead mentioned is Gary Oliva, a transient with a history of child molestation, who was seen in the Boulder area in December 1996, picked up his mail one block from the Ramsey home, and was present at a memorial service for JonBenet.(SMF 282; PSMF 282.)

Another purported lead was Bill McReynolds, who portrayed Santa Claus at a Christmas Party at defendants' home in December 1996, whose wife had written a play about a young girl held captive in a basement, whose daughter had been kidnapped and sexually assaulted twenty-two years to the day before JonBenet's death, and who had written a card to JonBenet that was found in her trash can after the murder.(SMF 283; PSMF 283.)

Finally, another lead identified by Detective Smit was plaintiff, who in his estimation presented too many "unanswered questions." (SMF 284; PSMF 284.) Defendants identified all of these men, and others, in their book as possible suspects.(SMF 328; PSMF 328; The Book at 165-168, 199-201, 215-216, & 310-312.) In addition, the Book discusses, but does not name, eight other leads.(SMF 328; PSMF 328.) In Chapter 33 of the Book, defendants present a detailed profile of the smurderer. The profile offered is that of a male ex-convict, aged 25-35, who is familiar with and owns a stun gun.(SMF 329; PSMF 329.) The passage at issue from the Ramsey book, that is the heart of the present libel claim, criticizes the Boulder Police Department for failing to investigate these possible leads in the murder investigation.(SMF 180; PSMF 180.)"

jameson's comment - nothing new here, just sharing this for possible newbies who may be interested.

Since: Jan 06

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#9 Jan 25, 2014
Starting on Darnay Hoffman's involvement and the credibility of certain witnesses:

"Plaintiffs counsel Darnay Hoffman also became interested in the case early in the murder investigation and has contributed to the continued media interest through the filing of various lawsuits. In March 1997, Mr. Hoffman sent a letter to the Boulder County District Attorney Alex Hunter suggesting that Charles Lindbergh had killed his child in a hoax kidnapping and that one of the defendants had killed JonBenet in a similar type hoax.(SMF 339; PSMF 339.) In May 1997, Mr. Hoffman sent Mr. Hunter a second letter in which Mr. Hoffman theorized that Mrs. Ramsey killed her daughter, through a blow to the head, in a fit of rage caused by unhappiness, depression and marital problems.(SMF 340; PSMF 340.) The Boulder authorities did not take Mr. Hoffman's unsubstantiated theories seriously and considered much of his submissions to be "off the wall." (SMF 341; PSMF 341.)

In the fall of 1997 Mr. Hoffman began to solicit the involvement of various handwriting experts, claiming that, although prior expert reports given to the Colorado Bureau of Investigation showed Mrs. Ramsey to be at the "very lowest end of the spectrum, i.e. there is little or no basis for a match," it would be a "career move" for an expert to submit an affidavit for use by Mr. Hoffman.(SMF 343; PSMF 343.) Indeed, forensic document examiners were eager to jump into the high-profile investigation. In July 1997, Ms. Wong, now plaintiffs expert, had originally contacted defendants' attorneys and offered to analyze the Ransom Note and point out weaknesses in analysis by "Government handwriting experts." (SMF 342; PSMF 342.) Defendants declined such an offer.
[253 F.Supp.2d 1340]
In September 1998, Ms. Wong wrote District Attorney Hunter, Assistant District Attorney Michael Kane, and Judge Roxanne Bailin, asking to testify before the Grand Jury.(SMF 347; PSMF 347.) By letter dated January 20, 1999, Mr. Hunter rejected the request, informing Ms. Wong that it was his opinion that she did not use scientifically reliable methods, her testimony would be inadmissible, and that she lacked credibility.(SMF 348; PSMF 348.) In addition, Mr. Epstein, defendants' other handwriting expert, also wrote to Mr. Hunter, at sometime before the end of 2000, to offer his assistance in examining the Ransom Note.(SMF 349; PSMF 349.) Mr. Hunter did not take Mr. Epstein up on his offer, either.(SMF 349; PSMF 349.)"

jameson's comment -- this is an important part of the Ramsey case story, it shows how people grabbed a chance to make a career move. I got hold of Darnay's letter to that handwriting "expert", published it online and that is how I met Darnay. There were lots of, well, let me call them "questionable" experts in this case. Most stories documented in one way or another. Dale Yeager exposed himself on a radio program put together by Lance Matthews and Lisa Flowers. Others just put out outrageous interviews and outted themselves that way. It was a crazy time, let me tell you. Crazy.

Since: Jan 06

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#10 Jan 25, 2014
On November 14, 1997, Mr. Hoffman filed a Complaint in the District Court for Boulder County, Colorado, on his own behalf as a plaintiff, asking that Mr. Hunter be forced to explain why he had not filed murder charges against Mrs. Ramsey.(SMF 344; PSMF 344.) Attached to the Complaint was the affidavit of Ms. Wong who, notwithstanding her earlier overture to the Ramseys, now claimed that Mrs. Ramsey had written the Ransom Note.(SMF 345; PSMF 345.) Mr. Hoffman's complaint was dismissed on January 20, 1998.(SMF 346; PSMF 346.)

In March 2000, Mr. Hoffman again filed suit, again on his own behalf as plaintiff, against defendants in the Supreme Court of New York, County of New York, for $25,000,000 in damages based on the allegation that he was defamed by certain passages in the defendants' Book.(SMF 353; PSMF 353.) On April 21, 2000, Mr. Hoffman dismissed this complaint.(SMF 354; PSMF 354.)

In addition, Mr. Hoffman has served as a long time source to news tabloids for information about the investigation.(See, e.g., John Latta, "JonBenet's Dad Was Framedby Mom, say insiders,") NATIONAL EXAMINER, June 24, 1997 (insider referred to is Mr. Hoffman); Art Dworkin, "Jon-Benet's Dad Lied Under Oath to Hide Death Fight," NATIONAL EXAMINER dated March 7, 2000 (quoting Mr. Hoffman's comments about Mr. Ramsey's deposition testimony); Art Dworkin, "Five Years Later JonBenet Parents Are Doing Little To Find Killer," NATIONAL EXAMINER, December 11, 2001 (quoting Mr. Hoffman as stating, among other things, that defendants "JUST DON'T CARE" about their daughter's murder investigation.)20
whodatninja

Pleasant Hill, CA

#11 Jan 26, 2014
The handwriting scale goes to nine. Lou Smit was confused and the attorneys didn't set him straight.

I'm giving him the benefit of the doubt here.

Since: Jan 06

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#12 Jan 26, 2014
sorry,but in this case they always used the 1 to 5 scale. PLease do look in the archives, the interviews of DA Alex Hunter, Lou Smit, look at the TV interviews and you will find that was the scale always used here. I admit, it used to confuse me too, why not 1 to 10? But in Chief Beckner's deposition, he also used 1 to 5. Don't take my word for it, all this can be verified if you just look up old posts, interviews, depositions.

Moving on in the Carnes decision, Cina Wong was not acceptable as an expert and Epstein had problems because he only had copies of the note and Patsy's handwriting. Their work for Darnay Hoffman wasn't impressive when ccepted experts who DID have access to all theactual case evidence said Patsy probably did NOT write the note.

Since: Mar 08

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#13 Jan 26, 2014
justwatching wrote:
sorry,but in this case they always used the 1 to 5 scale. PLease do look in the archives, the interviews of DA Alex Hunter, Lou Smit, look at the TV interviews and you will find that was the scale always used here. I admit, it used to confuse me too, why not 1 to 10? But in Chief Beckner's deposition, he also used 1 to 5. Don't take my word for it, all this can be verified if you just look up old posts, interviews, depositions.
I did more than that. I looked at Smit's testimony. Forget the scale because Hunter got it wrong and they all followed suit. Here are the examiners' conclusions in English:

For the police:
Ubowski, indications did write
Speckin, no conclusion
Alford, no conclusion +
Dusick, probably did not write

For Ramseys:
Cunningham, no conclusion
Ryle, highly probable did not write

So you see that most of the examiners were "no conclusion." On a nine scale, 5 would be no conclusion. That fits with Smit saying that the collective opinion of the examiners was "inconclusive or below" or 4.5.

Since: Mar 08

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#14 Jan 26, 2014
The relevant part of Smit's testimony:

"Q. Would you go through -- and I think your presentation picks up on this. Would you go through and give us the benefit now of the conclusions that you were made aware of that each of these handwriting experts reached with respect to Patsy Ramsey's handwriting analysis?

A [by Smit]. Yes. I am referring to the slide. Chet Ubowski, his results -- and this is a very brief rendition of his results. There were indications that Patsy Ramsey wrote the note. There is evidence which indicates that the ransom note may have been written by Patsy Ramsey. But the evidence falls short of that necessary to support a definite conclusion.

Leonard Speckin, he is a police expert, private forensic document analyst. "Lack of indications. I can find no evidence that Patsy Ramsey disguised her handwriting exemplars. When I compared the handprinting habits of Patsy Ramsey with those presented in the questioned ransom note, there exists agreement to the extent that some of her individual letter formations and letter combinations do appear in the ransom note. When this agreement is weighed against the number, type, and consistencies of the differences present, I am unable to identify Patsy Ramsey as the author of the questioned ransom note with any degree of certainty. I am, however, unable to eliminate her as the author."

Edwin Alford, Jr. "Lack of indications. Examination of the questioned handwriting and comparison of the handwriting specimens submitted has failed to provide a basis for identifying Patsy Ramsey as the writer of the letter."

Lloyd Cunningham, Ramsey expert, he is the one that certified Chet Ubowski. "Lack of indications," that he cannot identify or eliminate Patsy Ramsey as the author of the ransom note. And he has spent 20 hours examining the samples and documents and has found that there were no significant individual characteristics but much significant difference between Patsy's writing and the note.

Richard Dusick, he is the analyst for the United States Secret Service. These are the results of his specific report. "Lack of indications. A study and comparison of the questioned and specimen writings submitted has resulted in the conclusion that there is no evidence to indicate that Patsy Ramsey executed any of the questioned material appearing on the ransom note." Howard Ryle, the former CBI examiner, "probably not." His opinion in this case is between "probably not" and "elimination," elimination as Patsy Ramsey as the author of the ransom note. He believes that the writer could be identified if historical writings were found.

The results, the general consensus is inconclusive and below that Patsy wrote the note."
Just Wondering

Beckley, WV

#15 Jan 26, 2014
Okay. But can you please explain why any of these characters would have felt it necessary to write a ransom note? What purpose did they envision it serving? It does not fit with any theory of an intruder.

So we can disagree upon the author, as you wish, but a reasonable explanation for its existence does not itself exist.

Since: Mar 08

Location hidden

#16 Jan 26, 2014
Just Wondering wrote:
Okay. But can you please explain why any of these characters would have felt it necessary to write a ransom note? What purpose did they envision it serving? It does not fit with any theory of an intruder.
So we can disagree upon the author, as you wish, but a reasonable explanation for its existence does not itself exist.
I think Smit said that it was supposed to be a kidnapping, but the intruder got excited, couldn't wait and killed her. If there's something more plausible, I'm sure jameson will tell us.

In my opinion, if Patsy wrote it, it was intended to make cops think there was an intruder, but if that failed, the cops would, she hoped, think John wrote it.
docG

Pittsburgh, PA

#17 Jan 27, 2014
Jameson, a detailed review of the various "experts" who managed to convince themselves Patsy wrote the note can be found on my blog, beginning here: http://solvingjonbenet.blogspot.com/2012/10/t...

This should interest you as it raises some serious questions regarding their competence. I myself see NO resemblance between Patsy's hand (either left or right) and that of the note writer.
Joy

Miami, FL

#19 Jan 27, 2014
docG wrote:
Jameson, a detailed review of the various "experts" who managed to convince themselves Patsy wrote the note can be found on my blog, beginning here: http://solvingjonbenet.blogspot.com/2012/10/t...
This should interest you at JonBenet Investigation at Facebook and it raises some serious questions regarding their competence. I myself see NO resemblance between Patsy's hand (either left or right) and that of the note writer.
There were many experts.
Just Wondering

Beckley, WV

#20 Jan 27, 2014
I think the author was Patsy; docG thinks it was John. But can anyone offer a reason why an intruder would feel the need to write and leave this ransom note if his interest was in molesting/killing the child? And why would a kidnapper leave the note and the body behind when his objective was to secure a ransom?

Lou's explanation of a kidnapper turned pedophile/murderer just doesn't seem plausible to me. If the kidnapper/pedophile/murderer had intended to use a stun gun to immobilize the child, would a dead child have presented any more of a problem than an incapacitated one? Taking the body would have prevented any of the intruder's DNA from being collected and he would still be able to collect his ransom. So I disagree with Lou's theory.

Off topic slightly--did anyone find it odd that John just happened to pick up the very pad the ransom note was written on to give to the police for Patsy's handwriting sample? I suppose it was within sight and that was the reason he grabbed it, but had he been trying to point the police toward his wife, he could not have come up with a better scheme.

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