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candy

East Lansing, MI

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#202
Sep 10, 2013
 
That percentage is the number of cold case homicide hits versus the number of samples tested and entered into the felony arrestee database.
candy

East Lansing, MI

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#204
Nov 8, 2013
 

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To date,(end of October, 2013),121,000 arrestee samples have been taken and, of those, 99,000 were uploaded into CODIS. As a result 683 hits have occurred.

Beginning on March 1, 2014, Colorado law HB13-1020 goes into effect, and all sex assault kits gathered at any hospital in the state are to be submitted to CBI for testing.
candy

East Lansing, MI

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#206
Mar 2, 2014
 
Since October 1, 2010,(through the end of January, 2014), CBI has collected 129,703 DNA samples from felony arrestees. Of those, 107,003 were processed and entered into CODIS after felony charges were filed. CBI has received a total of 766 codis hits from these samples. Last year alone, 19 hits were provided on homicides. One of those 19 cases is a cold case homicide from Illinois.
candy

East Lansing, MI

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#207
Mar 2, 2014
 
And, read it and reap pro-Rams, there is basically NO explanation as to why "an intruder" who wrote a personal ransom note, hasn't been identified by the unsourced DNA, NO RELATIVES of that DNA, through "familial searches" have been identified either. Colorado is one of the few states allowing "familial DNA" searches, and CBI is actively using and teaching others how to use familial DNA searches.

"CBI has received an extension on the NIJ Cold Case grant. Since the amount of cases being submitted has dwindled, CBI is re-examining those cases that have been submitted. Has the work been completed? If so can a familial search be done? CBI will begin focusing on familial searches and provide agencies with assistance in teh way of over time or investigators.

What goes into a familial search? A DNA profile has been created on the perpetrator of the crime. The DNA sample is entered into CODIS. If the entry results in a direct hit, the information is taken to the originating agency for further investigation.

If there is no direct hit, the DNA sample can be resubmitted to see if it "kind of" matches. The information received from a familial search would help identify a potential parent, child or sibling of the perpetrator. These are the only relationships that can be looked at with the information they have. If the potential relative is male, and if the DNA of the perpetrator is male, then they can look at the "Y" male profile."
docG

Pittsburgh, PA

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#208
Mar 3, 2014
 

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candy wrote:
And, read it and reap pro-Rams, there is basically NO explanation as to why "an intruder" who wrote a personal ransom note, hasn't been identified by the unsourced DNA, NO RELATIVES of that DNA, through "familial searches" have been identified either.
etc.

Candy, to give you an idea of how feeble this so-called "DNA evidence" is, permit me to quote the following passage from my book:

NB: There's one thing more to be said regarding our mysterious intruder. Let's assume that some day a DNA match actually is found and let's assume the match is someone who lived in Boulder at the time of the murder and has no alibi. How could this person be prosecuted, when, as we have seen, there is no version of the intruder theory that makes any sense at all? The suspect’s lawyer could challenge the prosecution to explain how his client could have entered or exited the house when all the doors were locked and the basement window was undisturbed; why he wouldn't have prepared a note ahead of time; why he would have written it by hand rather than printed it or pasted together some words from a magazine; why he would have left his note on the staircase but not removed the body of the victim; why he would have wanted to hide the body; how he could have left without leaving footprints, etc. The DNA could be explained as the result of an innocent indirect transfer via some chance encounter with someone who, in turn, might have been in contact with the suspect. Unless his handwriting was a perfect match, extremely unlikely as the writer clearly made an effort to alter his usual style. And even if the "experts" decided his handwriting was a match, his lawyer could cite all the many other "experts" totally convinced Patsy wrote it. So no matter what way you look at it, the intruder theory is hopeless.

(from Ruled IN: Solving the JonBenet Ramsey Case, Chapter 11)
Just Wondering

Beckley, WV

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#209
Mar 4, 2014
 

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docG wrote:
<quoted text> etc.
Candy, to give you an idea of how feeble this so-called "DNA evidence" is, permit me to quote the following passage from my book:
NB: There's one thing more to be said regarding our mysterious intruder. Let's assume that some day a DNA match actually is found and let's assume the match is someone who lived in Boulder at the time of the murder and has no alibi. How could this person be prosecuted, when, as we have seen, there is no version of the intruder theory that makes any sense at all? The suspect’s lawyer could challenge the prosecution to explain how his client could have entered or exited the house when all the doors were locked and the basement window was undisturbed; why he wouldn't have prepared a note ahead of time; why he would have written it by hand rather than printed it or pasted together some words from a magazine; why he would have left his note on the staircase but not removed the body of the victim; why he would have wanted to hide the body; how he could have left without leaving footprints, etc. The DNA could be explained as the result of an innocent indirect transfer via some chance encounter with someone who, in turn, might have been in contact with the suspect. Unless his handwriting was a perfect match, extremely unlikely as the writer clearly made an effort to alter his usual style. And even if the "experts" decided his handwriting was a match, his lawyer could cite all the many other "experts" totally convinced Patsy wrote it. So no matter what way you look at it, the intruder theory is hopeless.
(from Ruled IN: Solving the JonBenet Ramsey Case, Chapter 11)
docG, I always considered Burke the culprit and Patsy the author of the ransom note. After reading your book, however, I can see the logic in your thinking; though I am not quite completely convinced.

I wonder if you have considered that John may have used the name "small foreign faction" in an effort to intimidate and frighten Patsy into taking Burke and leaving for Charlevoix that morning? Perhaps he thought that just the mere insinuation of foreign terroristic involvement would send her fleeing with their son--leaving the handling of the kidnapping in his capable, protective hands.

I had often thought eluding to a small foreign faction was something Burke may have suggested to his mom as she penned the note--it sounded that childish. The inclusion of that detail was just inexplicable to me. Why "small foreign faction"? But with your scenario, this could make quite a bit of sense.

But the name could have been included by Patsy in order to point as far away from the family, mainly her son, as humanly possible.
Just Wondering

Beckley, WV

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#210
Mar 4, 2014
 
Sorry the above comment was somewhat off topic, but it does show the complexities of the case--touch DNA notwithstanding.
docG

Pittsburgh, PA

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#211
Mar 7, 2014
 
Just Wondering wrote:
<quoted text>
docG, I always considered Burke the culprit and Patsy the author of the ransom note. After reading your book, however, I can see the logic in your thinking; though I am not quite completely convinced.
I wonder if you have considered that John may have used the name "small foreign faction" in an effort to intimidate and frighten Patsy into taking Burke and leaving for Charlevoix that morning? Perhaps he thought that just the mere insinuation of foreign terroristic involvement would send her fleeing with their son--leaving the handling of the kidnapping in his capable, protective hands.
I had often thought eluding to a small foreign faction was something Burke may have suggested to his mom as she penned the note--it sounded that childish. The inclusion of that detail was just inexplicable to me. Why "small foreign faction"? But with your scenario, this could make quite a bit of sense.
But the name could have been included by Patsy in order to point as far away from the family, mainly her son, as humanly possible.
I think that one purpose of the note was to construct a "kidnapper" who had worked with or for John at some point in the past and resented him. The "small foreign faction" looks to me like an allusion to John's business, which had strong ties to Lockheed, an important supplier of military equipment to the US government. The remark about "respecting" John's business but not "the country it serves" seems related, thematically to the notion of some foreign entity that might have been harmed by US military action in the past. I certainly don't believe it can be taken literally, nor do I believe the writer of the note expected it to be taken literally. But it does sound like the sort of thing someone "out to get" John might say, in order to both taunt and intimidate him. Of course, there was never any such person, but I do think John wrote the note with the intention of making it look like it was written by someone with a grudge against both John and his business success -- someone with inside knowledge of the business, as indicated by the sarcasm implied in the ransom amount, practically identical with John's bonus.
candy

East Lansing, MI

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#212
Mar 7, 2014
 
docG wrote:
<quoted text>
I think that one purpose of the note was to construct a "kidnapper" who had worked with or for John at some point in the past and resented him. The "small foreign faction" looks to me like an allusion to John's business, which had strong ties to Lockheed, an important supplier of military equipment to the US government. The remark about "respecting" John's business but not "the country it serves" seems related, thematically to the notion of some foreign entity that might have been harmed by US military action in the past. I certainly don't believe it can be taken literally, nor do I believe the writer of the note expected it to be taken literally. But it does sound like the sort of thing someone "out to get" John might say, in order to both taunt and intimidate him. Of course, there was never any such person, but I do think John wrote the note with the intention of making it look like it was written by someone with a grudge against both John and his business success -- someone with inside knowledge of the business, as indicated by the sarcasm implied in the ransom amount, practically identical with John's bonus.
Hi docg, I agree with your analysis, even though we disagree on who wrote the note. Skydog was the first poster I know of who theorized that the ransom note was written to frame Jeff Merrick for the crime. Merrick was one of the first thrown under the bus by John Ramsey.
candy

East Lansing, MI

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#213
Mar 7, 2014
 
Jeff Merrick on being thrown under the bus by John Ramsey:

Named in Ramseys' book

Some suspects were publicly named by the Ramsey family or legal experts they hired. One was Jeff Merrick, who was described as a suspect in a book by John and Patsy Ramsey.

"I was flabbergasted I had been named. I was fingered for a horrendous crime," said Merrick, a former employee of John Ramsey's at Access Graphics. "It had a tremendous impact on my life."

Merrick said John Ramsey three times asked authorities to investigate him, apparently on a theory that Merrick was a disgruntled former employee seeking revenge.

But Merrick said that he was laid off by Access Graphics, which has since changed its name, only because he was a whistle-blower and he received a settlement from Ramsey's company. By the time of JonBenét's murder, he had a higher-paying job at another company, he said.

"There was no reason at all that I would be motivated to kill his daughter," Merrick said. "I was a very, very unlikely suspect. Maybe (John Ramsey) wanted to take revenge."

Lin Wood, John Ramsey's attorney, did not return phone calls.

Merrick said he found it odd that the Ramseys would so freely throw his name around as a suspect, knowing how devastating the accusations against them had been.

"My wife was subjected to a lot of this stuff," he said. "The media was tough on us. The police delved into my past as deeply as anyone."

He said his wife's boss saw Merrick's name in an article and asked her: "Do you think there's a 1 percent chance he did it?"

http://www.denverpost.com/ci_4893483...
candy

East Lansing, MI

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#214
Thursday Jul 17
 
An astounding 24 CODIS hits on only 150 previously untested rape kits have come from just the first batch of testing. NONE OF THE CODIS HITS HAVE COME FROM BOULDER COUNTY. There are approximately 6,000 untested rape kits in Colorado:

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/call7-in...
Just Wondering

Oak Hill, WV

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#215
Thursday Jul 17
 
candy wrote:
An astounding 24 CODIS hits on only 150 previously untested rape kits have come from just the first batch of testing. NONE OF THE CODIS HITS HAVE COME FROM BOULDER COUNTY. There are approximately 6,000 untested rape kits in Colorado:
http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/call7-in...
Candy, what is your take exactly on the DNA in Jonbenet's underwear and on the long johns? Were there really enough markers to get a complete profile on it?
DNA

Flushing, MI

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#216
Thursday Jul 17
 

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Touch DNA refers to the DNA that is left behind from skin cells when a person touches or comes into contact with an item. However, since Touch DNA (also referred to as wearer or contact DNA) is invisible to the naked eye, and is usually deposited in smaller amounts than the DNA found in bloodstains or other body fluids, it is more difficult to identify areas where skin cells may be present. As such, it can be quite challenging to obtain DNA profiles from these samples. Obtaining successful Touch DNA results depends on recognizing items which may be suitable for Touch DNA analysis, proper collection/storage of these items, and the subsequent use of the optimal sampling technique that will recover the highest number of skin cells.

The key to obtaining successful Touch DNA
results depends on recognizing items which
may be suitable for Touch DNA analysis, proper
collection at the crime scene, and the application of a sampling technique that will recover
the highest number of skin cells. Through improvements
in sampling methods coupled with
increasingly sensitive DNA testing methods,
and through continual education of the criminal
justice community regarding the testing
possibilities, Touch DNA is enabling forensic
scientists to provide information in cases
which were once unsolvable.

Bode has extensive experience working on complicated cold cases and has been involved in numerous high profile cold cases including the JonBenet Ramsey homicide.

They got a full profile.
Fast

Flushing, MI

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#217
Thursday Jul 17
 

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New DNA kit claims results in 90 minutes

DNA tests usually take months or even years to complete, but a new DNA kit claims results in just 90 minutes. Fred Harran from the Pennsylvania Police Department and Bode Technologies’ Andrew Singer discuss.
DuckMan912

Stoughton, MA

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#218
Thursday Jul 17
 

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Patsy and john are liars. If you see a ransom note and when you read just two lines and understands somebody taken your daughter you will check her room and you will check other child if that child is there first thing you will do is you will wake up the child and ask you know where is jonbenet. And after that you will read entire letter. I saw it in an interview patsy said she didn't read the whole letter
Just Wondering

Oak Hill, WV

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#219
Friday Jul 18
 
DuckMan912, I agree wholeheartedly with you. The first thing most parents would do is run to their missing daughter's room, screaming her name as they went, and when she was not found they would wake up their son to see if he was playing a trick on them. And, upon finding that he was not, they would question him as to whether or not he had heard or seen Jonbenet during the night or if he had heard any unusual noises. But, apparently, the Ramseys were unusual people--they thought better of disturbing their son though they knew their daughter was missing from their home. Then they sent him out from their protective gaze with people they would later consider suspects in their Jonbenet's abduction.

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