Does DNA stay in clothes?
Indigo

Falmouth, ME

#3 Feb 19, 2007
Household use of detergents and cleaners does not necessarily destroy DNA.(19) Sperm heads on fabric can survive machine washing at 30--40C if no bleach was used.

The persistence of biological materials varies depending on the material and the conditions to which they are exposed. While laundered bloodstains may still be detectable, contact with water may interfere with the detection of water-soluble enzymes exploited in presumptive tests for semen (i.e., acid phosphatase) and saliva (i.e., amylase). Bathing, rain exposure, or submersion could result in acid phosphatase (AP) or amylase (and, consequently, semen or saliva) not being detected. While certain conditions may make it difficult to localize the semen, it has been demonstrated that spermatozoa can persist on clothing (2) and DNA profiles from semen can be generated (3) after laundering.

http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_...
Indigo

Falmouth, ME

#5 Feb 19, 2007
Shortly thereafter, when emergency personnel appeared on the scene, Mays observed the commotion, allowed the victim's mother to use his telephone, and invited several law enforcement officers into his house for refreshments. The next day, he washed his bloody clothes, threw the knife into a nearby ravine, and placed the duffle bag in the garbage.
Blood traces from Mays' laundered clothing revealed DNA that linked to the victims' DNA (snip)

http://www.oag.state.tx.us/newspubs/newsarchi...
Tired Of Censorship

Since: Nov 06

Roseville, CA

#8 Feb 19, 2007
Detroit Breakdown wrote:
Even the luminol test, the blue luminescence method popular in TV shows, produces false positives.
During an 1878 trial, Dr. William Hodgson Ellis, assistant professor of chemistry at King's College (now, the University of Toronto), testified about his analysis of stains found on the defendant's recently washed trousers. The results of Dr. Ellis' presumptive blood test showed that the stains were blood, but he warned that he could not say that the bloodstains were human blood.
This limitation presented a significant dilemma. Suspects found with fresh bloodstains on their persons could always maintain that the stains came from slaughtering an animal or handling meat. Police could not refute these claims if there were no way to distinguish between animal and human blood.
Think perhaps testing has gotten better since 1878?
gink

Fairfield, CT

#10 Feb 19, 2007
Detroit Breakdown wrote:
<quoted text>Yes, that`s why I posted several parts of the article, but Luminol still cannot differentiate betwen human and animal blood to this day.
Hey detroit, you seem to be in overtime...thes posts from you are alot of good info.

A question: do you know if the tested for blood with luminal at ramsey house? If not I wonder why? Thanks.
Tired Of Censorship

Since: Nov 06

Roseville, CA

#11 Feb 19, 2007
Detroit Breakdown wrote:
<quoted text>Yes, that`s why I posted several parts of the article, but Luminol still cannot differentiate betwen human and animal blood to this day.
I thought the topic was Does DNA stay in clothes?
Connie g

Manteca, CA

#13 Nov 28, 2016
Indigo wrote:
Household use of detergents and cleaners does not necessarily destroy DNA.(19) Sperm heads on fabric can survive machine washing at 30--40C if no bleach was used.

The persistence of biological materials varies depending on the material and the conditions to which they are exposed. While laundered bloodstains may still be detectable, contact with water may interfere with the detection of water-soluble enzymes exploited in presumptive tests for semen (i.e., acid phosphatase) and saliva (i.e., amylase). Bathing, rain exposure, or submersion could result in acid phosphatase (AP) or amylase (and, consequently, semen or saliva) not being detected. While certain conditions may make it difficult to localize the semen, it has been demonstrated that spermatozoa can persist on clothing (2) and DNA profiles from semen can be generated (3) after laundering.

http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_...
Can you extract dna from a rape sample that was taken over 12 years ago
Connie g

Manteca, CA

#14 Nov 28, 2016
Can u extract dna profile from semen that was collectied over 12 years ago on clothing.
robert

Yellowknife, Canada

#15 Nov 28, 2016
Connie g wrote:
Can u extract dna profile from semen that was collectied over 12 years ago on clothing.
---Taken in as evidence and stored propperly --yes.
A google seach likely will answer your question should there be other questions attached .

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