FBI Pofiler Bob Ressler's take on the...

FBI Pofiler Bob Ressler's take on the case...

Posted in the JonBenet Ramsey Forum

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Old South

AOL

#1 Oct 31, 2010
The following is a thumbnail account of Robert Ressler's profile on the JonBenet Ramsey case and I thought it might merit some discussion here. Bob Ressler has assisted with hundreds of investigations, including those of multiple murderers Charles Manson, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer and John Wayne Gacy. At the time he prepared this profile, Ressler was a private consultant in forensic behavioral science and based in Virginia. Ressler said the evidence, including the autopsy, suggests JonBenét was killed accidentally and "an elaborate cover-up was done to divert police away from the crime." Since I believe that Ressler and John Douglas were at odds regarding the profiles each developed on the case, I thought perhaps that those posters who might not be familiar with Ressler's profile might find it interesting and worth discussion.

A the time of this interview, Ressler said he's been to Boulder on two occasions. "I've talked to a number of people in the law enforcement field, the medical field, the prosecutor, one of the prosecutors out there, even some of the domestic help of the Ramseys and some media people as well. I've been to the location of the house, I've been around the house, I've looked at the neighborhood and I do not ascribe at all to the concept that a stranger broke into the house and, in an attempt to kidnap or abduct JonBenet, killed her and wrote the note, and then left. I believe it was some sort of an internal situation that occurred that I believe the Ramseys-- Mr. and Mrs. Ramsey, and possibly their son, Burke-- have more information available that they could provide police than they've held back in their non-cooperation they've put themselves in a position of being major suspects. But I've always believed that JonBenet was killed as a result of an accident that was being covered up. I'm not saying whether or not Ramsey's parents or the brother were involved in the actual killing, but I think that the entire elaborate staging was done to conceal the true facts of what really happened to that child."
Old South

AOL

#2 Oct 31, 2010
(Continued)

Further remarks,
Q. " What is the significance of the blanket covering JonBenét body that was found in the basement? What does this mean in terms of profiling--what does it tell you about the needs of the perpetrator?"

"Ressler: Well often times the covering of a body, and in particular the covering of the facial features, from a profiling standpoint indicates a personal knowledge of that individual and it's an act of retribution of sort and an act of undoing. In other words, it becomes a matter of guilt on the part of the individual. It does not indicate some psychopathic personality like the individual that killed Polly Klaas. That's not what you'd see in that type of case. It's more or less a person that's known the child, and feels remorse for the crime."

Q. Is that a staged aspect of the crime, or is that...

"Ressler: No, I don't think that's necessarily a staged aspect as much as it is a reflection of the the guilt and the remorse on the part of the killer. Either intentional or accidental."

Regarding the Ransom Note, Ressler remarked --
"The two gentlemen watching over your daughter do not particularly like you so I advise you not to provoke them. Speaking to anyone about your situation such as police or FBI will result in your daughter being beheaded.... Use that good, southern common sense of yours.''

Ressler said this passage and others that provide information about the kidnappers show the writer has no criminal experience.

"Kidnap notes do not give information," Ressler said. "They don't tell you how many people are in the organization, they don't tell you they are going to behead your daughter and they don't tell you the kind of container to use to get the money."

In addition, he said, the note, "reflects a person whose knowledge of kidnapping comes from movies and books."
Old South

AOL

#4 Oct 31, 2010
Sorry for the double post. The first part was lost in space (usual for Topix) and didn't appear until I found my original and reposted, which made it show up twice.

Again, sorry for any inconvenience.
Old South

AOL

#8 Oct 31, 2010
[QUOTE who=] Toots ; help me out on this one...[/QUOTE]

The blind leading the blind, or better still,

The idiot asking the insolent for help. Makes complete sense.
tootlems

United States

#9 Oct 31, 2010
Moon Jack wrote:
OS ; I wonder who has less brains... You or learnin... Toots ; help me out on this one... Moon Jack
Who cares! I think the "old school fool" hit the nail on the head as far as who's the dumbest between her and learnin. Like she said,

"The blind leading the blind"

or better still

"The idiot asking the insolent for help."

Makes complete sense to me!:)
tootlems

United States

#10 Oct 31, 2010
Old South wrote:
<quoted text>
The blind leading the blind, or better still,
The idiot asking the insolent for help. Makes complete sense.
You need to learn how to use the quotes OSF!:)

I think you may be lieing to us about being old. Your probably one of those HOT middle aged chicks about 18 or 19!:)
Old South

AOL

#12 Oct 31, 2010
tootlems wrote:
<quoted text>
You need to learn how to use the quotes OSF!:)
I think you may be lieing to us about being old. Your probably one of those HOT middle aged chicks about 18 or 19!:)
I KNOW how to use the quotes. I changed them deberately, and if you can't figure out WHY, then you're even dumber than you appear to be.

And don't try to impress me with your "HOT" tactics. You don't appeal to me at all. In fact, I get nauseated just replying to your posts.
BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#14 Nov 1, 2010
"In addition, he said, the note, "reflects a person whose knowledge of kidnapping comes from movies and books."

Bingo.
Too bad for him he left things with just scratching the surface of the tip of the iceberg.

“May you all come home”

Since: Mar 07

safely Bless you all

#15 Nov 1, 2010
Thanks for posting that Old South. Posters conveniently forget these comments and I remember when Ressler made them and the big outrage at the time.

It is pretty clear from Ressler and other FBI talking heads over the years that the FBI believe this was a staged crime scene and at the very least, the Ramseys have withheld information.

We also know that, at least most of the public does. I don't think anyone could argue Ressler's credentials, although they always try
OneWhoKnows

United States

#16 Nov 1, 2010
Moon Jack wrote:
Typo, Robert does ( NOT ) know his left hand from right... Moon Jack
Another typo... You left the "r" out of your first name.
BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#19 Nov 1, 2010
Moon Jack wrote:
The R's are not the sherlocks... The cops are, let them and the FBI figure out the crime scene... & all info withheld while I sit back and watch... Oh did ST remind you of the bad wolf ...? Hey Ramsey I'm going to huff and puff till I blow your house down... Moon Jack. My my : whose been sleeping in my bed, and eating out of my pineapple bowl, and it was ST who sat in papa bears chair... Moon Jack
It is no wonder you identify with the Ramsey case and why you try so hard to convince yourself that you are normal by whitewashing Patsy. You suffer from the same disorder:
NARCISSISTIC PERSONALITY DISORDER
As one of three basic personality traits, along with Aggressive and Perfectionist, the Narcissist was depicted as a grandiose, glad-handing showoff, intent on displaying an impressive image to the world. As it turns out, there was a hidden, darker side of the narcissistic personality yet to be revealed
The most important professional contribution to a modern, expanded definition of Narcissism was the work of Austrian-born psychoanalyst Heinz Kohut, who broke with Freudian tradition by presenting a new theory he called "Self Psychology".
Kohut saw the development of the Self as a fluid process rather than the mechanistic series of stages described by Freud. Rather than being perturbed, arrested and introverted during a linear course of development, the Self could be fragmented by traumas. Early childhood influences were seen as the main source of traumas, but those occurring later in life might also contribute.
NOBODY HOME
"Self disorders were the results of childhood traumas very much different to Freud's Oedipal, castration and other conflicts and fears. These are the traumas of the child either not being "seen" (an existence, a presence which are not affirmed by objects, especially the Primary Objects, the parents)-- or being regarded as an object for gratification or abuse.
"Such children develop to become adults WHO ARE NOT SURE THAT THEY DO EXIST (lack a sense of self-continuity) or that they are worth anything (lack of self-worth, or self-esteem). They suffer depressions, as neurotics do. But the source of these depressions is existential (a gnawing sensation of emptiness) as opposed to the "guilty-conscious" depressions of neurotics. Such depressions... are interrupted by rages because things are not going their way, because responses are not forthcoming in the way they expected and needed. Some of them may even search for conflict to relieve the pain and intense suffering of the poorly established self, the pain of the discontinuous, fragmenting, undercathected self of the child not seen or responded to as a unit of its own, not recognized as an independent self who wants to feel like somebody, who wants to go its own way....
"They are individuals whose disorders can be understood and treated only by taking into consideration the formative experiences in childhood of the total body-mind-self and its self-object environment -- for instance, the experiences of joy of the total self feeling confirmed, which leads to pride, self-esteem, zest, and initiative; or the experiences of shame, loss of vitality, deadness, and depression of the self who does not have the feeling of being included, welcomed, and enjoyed."
Only during the past decade has pathological Narcissism been fully examined, defined and recognized. It appears that Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) went largely unrecognized for decades because it is so elusive. Everyone's psyche contains at least a little incipient Narcissism. Desire for self-esteem and recognition are natural components of human nature. In a way, narcissism is a distorted projection of the American Dream. Nobody likes to acknowledge a sense of accomplishment (even a false one) as a form of mental illness -- least of all the Narcissist himself.
BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#20 Nov 1, 2010
The first official description of pathological Narcissism appeared in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders only 20 years ago, in 1980,

"A pervasive pattern of grandiosity (in fantasy or behavior), need for admiration, and lack of empathy, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by five (or more) of the following:
1. has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate achievements)

2. is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love

3. believes that he or she is "special" and unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special or high-status people (or institutions)

4. requires excessive admiration

5. has a sense of entitlement, i.e., unreasonable expectations of especially favorable treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations

6. is interpersonally exploitative, i.e., takes advantage of others to achieve his or her own ends

7. lacks empathy: is unwilling to recognize or identify with the feelings and needs of others

8. is often envious of others or believes that others are envious of him or her

9. shows arrogant, haughty behaviors or attitudes"

(from Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition., 1996, American Psychiatric Association)

BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#21 Nov 1, 2010
BASIC GOODNESS AS COVERUP

Conventional wisdom and logic don't apply in the solitary, manipulative realm of the Narcissist. Ordinary mortals require a substantial reality adjustment in order to comprehend the behavior of an individual who lacks empathy or boundaries of common decency. Most of us automatically assume,, that somewhere deep down at the core, people are basically good.(Well, maybe except for a few out and out psychopaths, such as serial killers; it takes a Hannibal Lector to make us doubt that basic assumption.)

Assuming that a pathological Narcissist has any good intentions -- whatsoever -- is a big mistake. They aren't usually overt criminals, though they will certainly commit crimes if they find it expedient or happen to operate within a criminal peer group. But they would rather get their associates to do the dirty work. Another term used for borderline Narcissists in business environments is "Serial Bullies."

Whatever his chosen venue or the extent of his pathology, the Narcissist lacks both moral scruples and a genuine sense of loyalty. The image these individuals present, and the attention supply they receive as feedback, are all that really matters. This unique agenda makes their motives alien to other people's comprehension, which in turn is their main protective device.
BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#22 Nov 1, 2010
AMORALITY IN ACTION



Grandiosity, exploitation and dissembling come naturally for such individuals. Repeat: They have little or no empathy, and few if any boundaries.

Narcissists are compulsively addicted to attention, or what he calls "narcissistic supply." Simply put, if they don't get a steady dose of attention -- they begin to doubt their own Selfhood, or existence as a person. Adoration, acclaim and envy are the favored forms of attention, but even negative attention (if it helps the Narcissist feel important) is better than being ignored or exposed as an ordinary, fallible, unremarkable human being. That is seen as the ultimate defeat: the loss of Self, a vacuum of non-existence.

These individuals create artificial "Selves" with superior attributes. Most are quite convincing to their families, their associates and themselves. They walk their talk as best they can, and many are extremely good at it. It is an obsession and a desperately self-fulfilling prophesy, because the attention and feedback generated by the Narcissist's grandiosity is his primary assurance THAT HE DOES EXIST. They make heroic efforts to fulfill their chosen roles, and often possess boundless energy.
BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#23 Nov 1, 2010
SYNTHETIC EMPATHY

From the Narcissist perspective, other people are viewed as inferior, simplistic, two-dimensional figures. They exist only to be controlled and used for his purposes. Narcissists fall into two overlapping categories: Intellectual and Somatic. The former (mostly male) try to impress with their intelligence and accomplishments. The latter (mostly female or homosexual like Andrew Cunanan) use physical beauty, social charm and sexual wiles as their assertion of superiority. Both types tend to be very good actors -- they convincingly feign affection, love, empathy, humanitarian ideals and other admirable human qualities, but only to get the supply of admiration they so desperately need. They are not, however, truly capable of feeling any of these sentiments. The whole world is a victim, waiting to be exploited for its supply of attention.

Of course, the condition involves co-dependency. The Narcissist needs attention and admiration -- the supply for his addiction. His spouse, associates and followers are gulled into awe and loyalty because they too need something -- whether it is the reflected glory of association with a superior being, a masochistic need to be controlled, or their own latent Narcissistic tendencies. Consider that in terms of cult followers, or "victims" of cults.

"A Narcissist is never whole without an adoring, submissive, available, self-denigrating partner. His very sense of superiority, indeed his False Self, depends on it.... It is through self-denial that the partner survives. He denies his wishes, hopes, dreams, aspirations, sexual needs, psychological needs, material needs, everything, which might engender the wrath of the Narcissist God-like supreme figure. The Narcissist is rendered even more superior through and because of this self-denial. It is easy to explain self-denial undertaken to facilitate and ease the life of a Great Man.... The relationships are characterized by rampant emergentism: roles are allocated almost from the start and any deviation meets with an aggressive, even violent reaction.
"The predominant chord in the partner's mind is utter, unadulterated confusion. Even the most basic relationships -- with husband, children, or parents -- remain bafflingly obscured by the giant shadows cast by the intensive interaction with the Narcissist. A suspension of judgment is part and parcel of a suspension of individuality, which is both a prerequisite to and the result of living with a Narcissist. The partner no longer knows what is true and right and what is wrong and forbidden.... His primordial sin is that he fell in love with an image, not with a real person. It is the voiding of the image that is mourned when the relationships end.

"The breakup of a relationship with a Narcissist is, therefore, more emotionally charged than usual....

"Why is it that the partner seeks to prolong his pain? What is the source and purpose of this masochistic streak? In all likelihood, the partner is an inverted Narcissist, a suppressed one, or a latent one in the limited sense that his psychological make-up and formation are identical to those of the Narcissist. This deep-rooted, deep-seated identity fosters the frequent follies-a-deux which is the Narcissistic couple."

Some degree of Narcissism is a natural component of a normal Self. Everyone had fantasies of omniscience as a child, and presumably would not object to possessing a few superhuman powers. Heck, if nothing else, it would be easier to rearrange the furniture by levitating it.
BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#24 Nov 1, 2010
"The Narcissist is possessed of an uncanny ability to psychologically penetrate others. Often, this gift is abused and put at the service of the narcissist's control freakery and sadism. The Narcissist uses it liberally to annihilate the natural defenses of his victims by faking unprecedented, almost inhuman, empathy.
"This capacity is coupled with the Narcissist's ability to frighteningly imitate emotions and their attendant behaviours. The Narcissist possesses "resonance tables". He keeps records of every action and reaction, every utterance and consequence, every datum provided by others regarding their state of mind and emotional make-up. From these, he then constructs a set of formulas which often result in impeccably and eerily accurate renditions of emotional behaviour. This is enormously deceiving.
BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#25 Nov 1, 2010
The underlying assumption of superiority makes things difficult for therapists who attempt to work with Narcissists. They believe that no one possessing their feigned superior qualities would need help in the first place. If it were true that they needed help and got it, the invented Self might cease to exist. Maybe there would be nothing left. Few acknowledge that they have a problem or seek therapy anyway until a severe crisis occurs, such as desertion by a co-dependent mate, or an episode of exposure and utter humiliation. Even then, they spend most of their time in therapy trying to outwit and impress the therapist.





The Narcissist endows himself with license to operate outside laws and moral codes.
NO RESPONSIBILITY

The Narcissist will do virtually anything to evade being held accountable for his baser actions -- not because of guilt, but because it would reveal him as fallible and ordinary. History is rewritten and present time reality is restructured to avoid this possibility. Blame is shifted to others.


Narcissistic symptoms can very likely be acquired, and certainly reinforced, through association and emulation. You can't beat them so you join them. In cases where abuse is a factor, that might the only defense. "Some people... adopt the role of a professional victim. In doing so, they become self-centred, devoid of empathy and, abusive and exploitative. In other words, they become narcissists. The role of professional victims -- ones whose existence and very identity is defined solely and entirely by their victimhood -- is well researched in victimology. It doesn't make for a nice reading. These victim "pros" are often more cruel, vengeful, vitriolic, discompassionate and violent than their abuser. They make a career of it. They identify with this role to the exclusion of all else. It is a danger to be avoided. And this is precisely what I called Narcissistic Contagion or Narcissism by Proxy." Most Narcissists -- full-blown or incipient -- seek or invent associations with important people demonstrating a craving to be seen as larger than life. Even their imaginary enemies are seen as important and powerful.

We aren't talking about situational ethics, but an absence of ethics. If it provides narcissistic supply, it's the thing to do.
BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#26 Nov 1, 2010
"The narcissist is a solipsist. He carries the whole universe in his mind. To him, nothing exists except himself. Meaningful others are his extensions, assimilated by him, internal objects -- not external ones. Thus, losing control of a significant other -- is equivalent to the loss of control of a limb, or of one's brain. It is terrifying. It is paradigm-shattering. Independent or disobedient people evoke in the narcissist the realization that something is wrong with his worldview, that he is not the centre of the world or its cause and that he cannot control what, to him, are internal representations.
"To the narcissist, losing control means going insane."

"Any statement or fact, which seems to contradict his inflated perception of his grandiose self. Any criticism, disagreement, exposure of fake achievements, belittling of "talents and skills" which the narcissist fantasizes that he possesses, any hint that he is subordinated, subjugated, controlled, owned or dependent upon a third party. Any positioning of the narcissist as average and common, indistinguishable from many others. Any intimation that the narcissist is weak, needy, dependent, deficient, slow, not intelligent, naive, gullible, susceptible, not in the know, manipulated, a victim.

"The narcissist is likely to react with rage to all these and, in an effort to re-establish his fantastic grandiosity, he is likely to expose facts and stratagems he had no conscious intention of exposing....

"Any insinuation, hint, intimation, or direct declaration that the narcissist is not special at all, that he is average, common, not even sufficiently idiosyncratic to warrant a fleeting interest will inflame the narcissist.

"Add to this a negation of the narcissist's sense of entitlement and the combustion is inevitable. Tell the narcissist that he does not deserve the best treatment, that his needs are not everyone's priority, that he is boring, that his needs can be catered to by an average practitioner (medical doctor, accountant, lawyer, psychiatrist), that he and his motives are transparent and can be easily gauged, that he will do what he is told, that his temper tantrums will not be tolerated, that no special concessions will be made to accommodate his inflated sense of self, etc. and the narcissist will lose control."

BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#28 Nov 1, 2010
Moon Jack wrote:
That was a good profile of your self... Moon Jack
That was the anticipated narcissistic response. You can't escape what you are, you can only keep going to the same well, over and over and over and over and ...
BrotherMoon

Denver, CO

#29 Nov 1, 2010
Moon Jack wrote:
That was a good profile of your self... Moon Jack
As if you read it.

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