The U.S. Immigration System Is Broken

The U.S. Immigration System Is Broken

There are 11 comments on the Real Clear Politics story from Jun 22, 2014, titled The U.S. Immigration System Is Broken. In it, Real Clear Politics reports that:

At 17 per cent of the U.S. population, the Hispanic presence is now a huge force in U.S. politics.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Real Clear Politics.

Level 4

Since: Apr 09

small town

#1 Jun 22, 2014
naw they just have BIG mouths and aggressive behavior. Th illegal immigrants are "PARASITES" to the UNITED STATES TAXPAYERS.
wild child

Brooklyn, NY

#2 Jun 23, 2014
Deport everyone, then fix it, make it 20 yrs for them to come over legally
juan is a narcissist

Kansas City, MO

#4 Jun 23, 2014
Juan wrote:
The U. S. is made up of immigrants, we should be welcomed
Legal immigrants have always been welcome. On the other hand illegal aliens like you should be deported whenever and where ever found. Go back to soup city and take care of your mother you won't be missed eh pendejo?
Memo From Turner

Cortlandt Manor, NY

#5 Jun 24, 2014
juan is a narcissist wrote:
<quoted text>
Legal immigrants have always been welcome. On the other hand illegal aliens like you should be deported whenever and where ever found. Go back to soup city and take care of your mother you won't be missed eh pendejo?
I am glad to see at least one person on these boards that acknowledges that the children that have entered the country recently did so in accordance with the law. It is surprising to see how people have tried to misconstrue this into something completely different.

Level 4

Since: Apr 09

small town

#6 Jun 24, 2014
Under U.S. law, the term refugee refers to a person who is located outside of the United States, is of “special humanitarian concern to the United States” and has demonstrated that they were persecuted or have a well-founded fear of persecution because of race, religion, nationality, social group or political opinion in their country of origin. A total of 73,293 people were admitted to the United States as refugees during 2010, the latest year for which data are available, while 21,113 individuals were granted asylum.

Most who come to the United States as refugees are referred through the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. The United States has a legal obligation under Article 33 of the U.N. Refugee Convention, to which it is a party, to accept a certain number of refugees each year.

Earlier this year, the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees surveyed 404 children from Mexico and Central America who crossed the border illegally and asked why they left their country. The report found "that no less than 58 percent of the 404 children interviewed were forcibly displaced" to a degree that warranted international protection, meaning that if the U.S. refused these children, it could be in breach of U.N. conventions.

The U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) handles referrals from the Commissioner and a limited number of other applications through embassies. The applicants are interviewed abroad and, if approved, becomes eligible for services through the Department of Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). That’s the same office currently caring for unaccompanied alien children. But in the case of a qualified refugee, ORR and the Department of State place people in locations around the United States,

ORR’s placement of refugees has generated significant public opposition in the past. In a recent case, the mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts called for an end to refugee resettlement in his city, saying the families placed there are straining services.

Cities like Springfield receive about $1,800 per person in federal funding to assist refugees for as long as eight months, but Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno says that is not enough time for some refugees to adjust. "I have enough urban issues to deal with. Enough is enough," Sarno said. "You can't keep concentrating poverty on top of poverty." One-third of his city’s population lives below the poverty line.

The refugee program in the United States has been subject to substantial fraud. At a February 2014 hearing, the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security released a document produced by United States Citizenship and Immigration Services entitled "Asylum Benefit Fraud and Compliance Report". It found that just 30% of asylum cases surveyed were fraud-free -- in other words, 70% bore some indication of fraud.
juan is a narcissist

Kansas City, MO

#7 Jun 24, 2014
Memo From Turner wrote:
<quoted text>
I am glad to see at least one person on these boards that acknowledges that the children that have entered the country recently did so in accordance with the law. It is surprising to see how people have tried to misconstrue this into something completely different.
Sorry to disappoint you they did not go through our legal process of applying to legally enter our country according to the laws in place, they came illegally. Don't put words in my mouth. I do not condone how they came as they did not follow the law. Period. Buzz off.

None came with Visit visas issued by the US Consulate in their home countries.
None came with Student visas issued by the US Consulate in their home countries.
None came with Work visas issued by the US Consulate in their home countries.

They are being spoon fed lines on supposed fleeing for asylum reasons which we all know including you is a pack of lies. If you don't then you are more stupid than I thought.

Don't you me as your means of trying to justify their illegal actions, I don't condone it and want all "illegal aliens" including the current lot invading our country gone.

I do however welcome those who have applied from their home countries and been accepted through our processes and laws. Those slithering across the border can go back and never again be admitted....period...

Have a nice day..
Memo From Turner

Cortlandt Manor, NY

#8 Jun 24, 2014
dirtbag1958 wrote:
Under U.S. law, the term refugee refers to a person who is located outside of the United States, is of “special humanitarian concern to the United States” and has demonstrated that they were persecuted or have a well-founded fear of persecution because of race, religion, nationality, social group or political opinion in their country of origin. A total of 73,293 people were admitted to the United States as refugees during 2010, the latest year for which data are available, while 21,113 individuals were granted asylum.
Most who come to the United States as refugees are referred through the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. The United States has a legal obligation under Article 33 of the U.N. Refugee Convention, to which it is a party, to accept a certain number of refugees each year.
Earlier this year, the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees surveyed 404 children from Mexico and Central America who crossed the border illegally and asked why they left their country. The report found "that no less than 58 percent of the 404 children interviewed were forcibly displaced" to a degree that warranted international protection, meaning that if the U.S. refused these children, it could be in breach of U.N. conventions.
The U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) handles referrals from the Commissioner and a limited number of other applications through embassies. The applicants are interviewed abroad and, if approved, becomes eligible for services through the Department of Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). That’s the same office currently caring for unaccompanied alien children. But in the case of a qualified refugee, ORR and the Department of State place people in locations around the United States,
ORR’s placement of refugees has generated significant public opposition in the past. In a recent case, the mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts called for an end to refugee resettlement in his city, saying the families placed there are straining services.
Cities like Springfield receive about $1,800 per person in federal funding to assist refugees for as long as eight months, but Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno says that is not enough time for some refugees to adjust. "I have enough urban issues to deal with. Enough is enough," Sarno said. "You can't keep concentrating poverty on top of poverty." One-third of his city’s population lives below the poverty line.
The refugee program in the United States has been subject to substantial fraud. At a February 2014 hearing, the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security released a document produced by United States Citizenship and Immigration Services entitled "Asylum Benefit Fraud and Compliance Report". It found that just 30% of asylum cases surveyed were fraud-free -- in other words, 70% bore some indication of fraud.
Who called them refugees? They have requested asylum and submitted the required I-489 forms. Being an asylee and a refugee are much different things. Why do you think the adults were all given work permits and sent on their way? The children obviously can not be set free until they locate a family member, but they have the same legal status as those that were released.

Since: May 11

Location hidden

#9 Jun 29, 2014
The problem is that the legal immigration system is a complete cluster fuck.

My wife immigrated legally. It took her several years, and shit tons of money, to go through the cluster fuck of a "system."

She was lucky, she spoke English, was well educated (advanced college degree), and wealthy. People like her can grind it out and eventually get through the bureaucratic GOAT SCREW that is the US "legal" immigration system.

But anyone who does not speak English, is not wealthy, and/or does not have a valuable college degree knows that he HAS ESSENTIALLY A 0% chance of entering the USA legally. So, of course, they enter illegally (duh?).

If you tell people that they have NO CHANCE unless they are rich and well educated, you can expect people to disobey the law (again, duh?).

The US immigration system is a complete mess. It's far easier to walk into the USA today and SKIP the system and enter illegally than deal with the dip shits in immigration and hope you can get "permission" to enter in 2022. So don't be surprised that most people just say "screw it" and enter illegally.
Memo From Turner

Cortlandt Manor, NY

#10 Jun 30, 2014
libertarian4321 wrote:
The problem is that the legal immigration system is a complete cluster fuck.
My wife immigrated legally. It took her several years, and shit tons of money, to go through the cluster fuck of a "system."
She was lucky, she spoke English, was well educated (advanced college degree), and wealthy. People like her can grind it out and eventually get through the bureaucratic GOAT SCREW that is the US "legal" immigration system.
But anyone who does not speak English, is not wealthy, and/or does not have a valuable college degree knows that he HAS ESSENTIALLY A 0% chance of entering the USA legally. So, of course, they enter illegally (duh?).
If you tell people that they have NO CHANCE unless they are rich and well educated, you can expect people to disobey the law (again, duh?).
The US immigration system is a complete mess. It's far easier to walk into the USA today and SKIP the system and enter illegally than deal with the dip shits in immigration and hope you can get "permission" to enter in 2022. So don't be surprised that most people just say "screw it" and enter illegally.
The situation with legal immigration gets worse and worse all of the time. This is the root of the whole problem.
Dee Dee Dee

Emmaus, PA

#11 Jun 30, 2014
The root of the problem is getting amnesty out of immigration reform and treat them as what they are, two separate issues. Millions of people have totally ignored the immigration laws of this country and should be dealt with as criminals which is what they are. There are also many people who are trying to immigrate legally and have been caught in a system that has been created to expand itself, make arbitrary decisions, feed lawyers, judges and other government employees. This is what needs to be fixed and granting amnesty to millions of illegal aliens will not in anyway help or benefit those who are trying to immigrate legally. In fact it will only tax an already over burdened system slowing the process even further.
FIFY

Kansas City, MO

#13 Jul 3, 2014
Juan wrote:
Those of us illegal aliens who suck off society should be tossed out of the US, we will accept nothing less.
Yep we agree juanita...

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Immigration Reform Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News News Trump continues to paint immigrants as cri... 8 min spocko 686
News Donald Trump claims Dreamer immigrants have bee... 14 min anotherview2 24
Has Donald Trump Already Failed Us? (Nov '16) 1 hr Quirky 17,193
Rose's Pub (Mar '10) 2 hr Mickey Ratt Club 148,624
Family-based category immigration 4 hr spud 2
News 'Dreamers' left in limbo as Senate rejects immi... 5 hr spud 15
News ICE Arrests Nearly 200 Convicted Criminal Illeg... 7 hr spud 11
More from around the web