The President has failed us

The President has failed us

There are 404198 comments on the Times News story from Jun 9, 2012, titled The President has failed us. In it, Times News reports that:

This week, I decided to list the reasons I would not vote for Barack Obama in the next election.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Times News.

American Lady

Danville, KY

#178697 Sep 1, 2013
Justice Dale wrote:
LMAO!!! Obama is one dead prick, politically speaking!!!!
Yep, the bastard has overstepped his authority on Syria!!
Oh!!! Monitors, how does it feel to belong to a Nazi organization, good luck, you will need it!!!!
Hi JD!
Nice to see you again!
You've been 'missed'...!!!
Level 1

Since: Aug 13

Bozeman, MT

#178698 Sep 1, 2013
martinezjosei wrote:
The Nobel "peace"price winner in Washington D.C is on yet another path towards war.
Let's hope our dysfunctional Congress, who could not agree on the time of day if their lives depended on it, votes NO.
Justice Dale

Wichita, KS

#178699 Sep 1, 2013
American Lady wrote:
<quoted text>
Hi JD!
Nice to see you again!
You've been 'missed'...!!!
LMAO!!! Missed, I have been kicked off all US News threads for weeks, guess I pissed them off!!!
Oh, well!!! I guess this what you get for speaking the truth!!!
Justice Dale

Wichita, KS

#178700 Sep 1, 2013
nite all!!!
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178701 Sep 1, 2013
Sarin was discovered in 1938 in Wuppertal-Elberfeld in Germany by scientists at IG Farben attempting to create stronger pesticides; it is the most toxic of the four G-Series nerve agents made by Germany. The compound, which followed the discovery of the nerve agent tabun, was named in honor of its discoverers: Schrader, Ambros, Rüdiger and Van der Linde.[21]
Use as a weapon
In mid-1939, the formula for the agent was passed to the chemical warfare section of the German Army Weapons Office, which ordered that it be brought into mass production for wartime use. A number of pilot plants were built, and a high-production facility was under construction (but was not finished) by the end of World War II. Estimates for total sarin production by Nazi Germany range from 500 kg to 10 tons.[22] Though sarin, tabun and soman were incorporated into artillery shells, Germany did not use nerve agents against Allied targets.
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178702 Sep 1, 2013
FRANCE CANNOT GO IT ALONE

The United States had originally been expected to lead a strike relatively quickly, backed up by its NATO allies Britain and France. But British lawmakers voted on Thursday against any involvement and France said on Sunday it would await the U.S. Congress' decision.

"France cannot go it alone," Interior Minister Manuel Valls told Europe 1 radio. "We need a coalition."

French President Francois Hollande, whose country ruled Syria for more than two decades until the 1940s, has come under increasing pressure to put the intervention to parliament.

A BVA poll on Saturday showed most French people did not approve of military action and most did not trust Hollande to conduct such an operation.

Jean-Marc Ayrault, his prime minister, was to meet the heads of both houses of parliament and the conservative opposition on Monday before lawmakers debate Syria on Wednesday.

French first lady Valerie Trierweiler said on Sunday she was still in shock over pictures of Syrian children killed in the attack and told France's M6, "I do not know how one can bear it, how one can accept it."

Syria and its main ally, Russia, say rebels carried out the gas attack to draw in foreign military intervention. Moscow has repeatedly used its Security Council veto to block action against Syria, saying it would be illegal and only inflame the civil war.

Critics say further delay by Obama is simply buying Assad more time.

The Istanbul-based Syrian opposition coalition said Assad had moved military equipment and personnel to civilian areas and put prisoners in military sites as human shields against any Western air strikes.

It said rockets, Scud missiles and launchers as well as soldiers had been moved to locations including schools, university dormitories and government buildings inside cities.

Reuters could not independently verify the reports, and attempts to reach Syrian officials for comment were unsuccessful.

Obama's credibility has already been called into question for not punishing Assad over earlier alleged gas attacks, and he is under pressure to act now that he believes Damascus has crossed what he once described as a "red line".

Failure to act, some say, could mean Iran would feel free to press on with a nuclear program the West believes is aimed at developing an atomic bomb and that might encourage Israel to take matters into its own hands.

"If Obama is hesitating on the matter of Syria, then clearly on the question of attacking Iran - a move that is expected to be far more complicated - Obama will hesitate much more, and thus the chances Israel will have to act alone have increased," Israeli Army Radio quoted an unnamed government official as saying.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/02/us-... #
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178703 Sep 1, 2013
Syria: A stunning about-turn, but the signs had been there

Monday, Sep 2, 2013, 8:37 IST | Agency: Daily Telegraph

It was a stunning about-turn from Barack Obama to seek Congressional authorisation for air strikes on Syria, but in hindsight it was clear as early as Friday afternoon that all was not well at the White House.

Just minutes after John Kerry, his secretary of state, had given that thunderous lunchtime speech warning that there would be "no end to the test of our resolve" if the Assad regime went unpunished for using chemical weapons, Mr Obama's own resolve already appeared to be waning. Speaking only minutes after Kerry had apparently made a cast-iron case for war, it was a diffident Obama who spoke, choosing not to take to the presidential lectern, but to offer a brief aside before a low-key meeting with the presidents of Latvia and Lithuania.

"A lot of people think something should be done but nobody wants to do it," observed Obama, betraying doubts that, it now emerges, had been steadily growing during one of the most turbulent weeks of his entire presidency. For those who knew where to look, there had been warning signs.

All week, observers noted the disparity between the stentorian pronouncements of Kerry and the lawyerly observations of Obama, but few - including Kerry, it seems - had realised how seriously Obama was starting to doubt the wisdom of going it alone. The week that ended in an about-turn began with a moment of clarity, aides told The New York Times, when Obama sat down with advisers on Saturday to review the horrendous videos of children writhing and dying in Syria. "When I was talking about chemical weapons, this is what I was talking about", the president said, stopping short of a decision to take military action, but making clear that some action would need to be taken.

On Monday, Kerry reflected that new momentum, talking of the "moral obscenity" of the Syria regime and promising "accountability". But on Wednesday, even as warships were being deployed to the Mediterranean, Obama again betrayed his doubts, giving an interview to US public television in which he appeared stressed and spoke tepidly in comparison to the ire of Mr Kerry and William Hague. Any action against Assad would be "limited, narrow", and amount only to a "shot across the bows", he said, admitting once again that there were "no good options" in Syria.
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178704 Sep 1, 2013
And then on Thursday came Cameron's shock defeat in the Commons that leftObama facing the prospect of taking action without the UN, without Nato and now without his most trustworthy ally. By Friday night those nagging doubts had swelled into a plan of action that would surprise everybody. "He had been kicking the idea around his head for days," one aide told CNN, but it was not until Friday evening, just after 6pm, that Obama confided his intentions with Denis McDonough, his chief of staff, during a 45-minute walk around the South Lawn of the White House.

Aides said that the combination of David Cameron's defeat, Congress's demands for a vote, unfavourable public opinion polls and Mr Obama's own belief in the need for consultation before strikes, which he had espoused as a presidential candidate in 2007, had all played a part. Returning to the Oval Office at 7pm, photographs released by the White House show Mr Obama huddled with his closest personal aides, including Mr McDonough, and Susan Rice, his national security adviser, as he announced his plan to seek Congressional backing.

"I have a pretty big idea I want to test with you guys," he said to the group, according to a White House aide quoted in The New York Times, and then proceeded to lay out the rationale for seeking backing from Congress. Several of those in the room, the Associated Press reported, argued against Obama, warning of the risks of asking for the backing from Congress, particularly the Republican-controlled House of Representatives. The president was not persuaded, however, and at 9pm on Friday Obama picked up the phone to Kerry; Joe Biden, his vice-president and Chuck Hagel, his defence secretary, to tell them of his decision.

To the outside world, however, air strikes still seemed imminent on Saturday morning as cameras caught Biden and secretaries Kerry and Hagel entering the White House in casual dress, for a meeting in the Situation Room with the President and the principal players. But behind closed doors, after more discussion and further talks with Congressional leaders from both parties, the final decision was being made not to act - at least not for now.

The president's decision left many stunned. While Congressional leaders formally welcomed the consultation, those who had looked to Obama for action saw not wisdom or leadership, but trademark indecision from a president who has long "led from behind" on foreign policy. "He looks completely indecisive and weak right now," a Senate aide told The Daily Telegraph after the announcement, "If he loses the vote, I truly fear for our national security. If he wins the vote, whatever strike follows will seem a hollow afterthought."

http://www.dnaindia.com/world/1883073/comment...
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178705 Sep 1, 2013
Syria crisis: Rebels express outrage at US failure to act

Monday, Sep 2, 2013, 8:44 IST | Agency: Daily Telegraph

Syrian rebels and opposition leaders expressed outrage on Sunday at President Barack Obama's last-minute decision to hold off from military intervention and suggested other "pariah states" could be encouraged if the West failed to take any action.

The opposition in exile, the Syrian National Coalition, urged Congress to "make the right choice" and vote for a strike on Bashar al-Assad's regime. "Dictatorships like Iran and North Korea are watching closely to see how the free world responds to the Assad regime's use of chemical weapons against the Syrian people," it said.

"If the free world fails to respond to such an outrageous breach of international norms, dictators around the world will be encouraged in their efforts to follow the example set by Assad." Activists and rebel fighters went further, with some saying the decision showed Obama was in a "secret conspiracy" with the Syrian president. For once, Assad and his opponents had some views in common. Faisal al-Mokdad, the Syrian deputy foreign minister, said Obama's decision showed his "sense of hesitation and confusion".

Assad himself said: "Syria is capable of facing up to any external aggression just as it faces up to internal aggression every day, in the form of terrorist groups and those that support them." The threat of imminent military action had caused chaos across the country, and its sudden suspension left a sense of uncertainty about what was really likely to happen.

Activists claimed that thousands of political prisoners and civilians had been rounded up and placed as "human shields" in potential targets, while soldiers and other human targets took refuge in the civilian population, by hiding in mosques and schools.

But a spokesperson for the rebels in Rastan, a town in Homs province that has held out against the regime for more than a year, said they had still wanted outside help. He said rebels felt "let down by the international world". Opposition leaders said they believed Congress would support action.

http://www.dnaindia.com/world/1883076/report-... #
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178706 Sep 1, 2013
Why Russia, Iran and China are defending Syria

Allegations of a chemical weapons attack carried out by the Syrian regime last week have heightened tensions internationally. There’s been tough talk from Western leaders and a flurry of activity by the United States — all of which seem to suggest that a military strike against the regime could be in the offing. But through it all, Syria seems to retain the support of some good friends. Why do Russia, Iran and China continue to support a regime that’s accused of slaughtering tens of thousands of civilians in the 2-year-old civil war? Here’s why.

RUSSIA

Why it cares:

Two main reasons: One has to do with economics; the other with ideology.

a) Economics: Russia is one of Syria’s biggest arms suppliers.

Syrian contracts with the Russian defense industry have likely exceeded $4 billion, according to Jeffrey Mankoff, an adjunct fellow with the Center for Strategic and International Studies Russia and Eurasia Program.

He noted the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute estimated the value of Russian arms sales to Syria at $162 million per year in both 2009 and 2010.

Moscow also signed a $550 million deal with Syria for combat training jets.

Russia also leases a naval facility at the Syrian port of Tartus, giving the Russian navy its only direct access to the Mediterranean, Mankoff said.

b) Ideology: Russia’s key policy goal is blocking American efforts to shape the region.

Russia doesn’t believe revolutions, wars and regime change bring stability and democracy. It often points to the Arab Spring and the U.S.-led war in Iraq as evidence.

Russia also doesn’t trust U.S. intentions in the region. It believes humanitarian concerns are often used an excuse for pursuing America’s own political and economic interests.

“Russia’s backing of (Syrian President Bashar) al-Assad is not only driven by the need to preserve its naval presence in the Mediterranean, secure its energy contracts, or counter the West on ‘regime change,’” said Anna Neistat, an associate program director at Human Rights Watch.

“It also stems from (Russian President Vladimir) Putin’s existential fear for his own survival and the survival of the repressive system that he and al-Assad represent. In Putin’s universe, al-Assad cannot lose because it means that one day he, Putin, might as well.”

What it’s saying:

Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov insists there’s no proof yet Syria’s government is behind the chemical weapons attack. And any plans to strike Syria would challenge provisions of the U.N. charter, the ministry said.

The ministry accused Washington of trying to “create artificial groundless excuses for military intervention.”

On Wednesday, Russia walked out of a U.N. Security Council meeting where Britain was expected to pursue a resolution to authorize the use of force against Syria.

“The West handles the Islamic world the way a monkey handles a grenade,” Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin tweeted.

Why it matters:

Russia is a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council. It has the power to veto Security Council resolutions against the Syrian regime and has done so repeatedly over the past two years. So, if the United States and its allies are relying on a U.N. mandate to greenlight a military strike, they may be waiting a long time.

Why Russia, Iran and China are defending Syria

Allegations of a chemical weapons attack carried out by the Syrian regime last week have heightened tensions internationally. There’s been tough talk from Western leaders and a flurry of activity by the United States — all of which seem to suggest that a military strike against the regime could be in the offing. But through it all, Syria seems to retain the support of some good friends. Why do Russia, Iran and China continue to support a regime that’s accused of slaughtering tens of thousands of civilians in the 2-year-old civil war? Here’s why.
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178707 Sep 1, 2013
IRAN

Why it cares:

Iran and Syria are bound by two factors: religion and strategy.

a) Religion: Iran is the world’s most populous Shiite Muslim nation. The Syrian government is dominated by Alawites, a Shiite offshoot, and the rebels are dominated by Sunnis.

That connection has bound them for quite a while. Iran counted on Syria as its only Arab ally during its eight-year war with Iraq. Iraq was Sunni-dominated.

The last thing Iran wants now is a Sunni-dominated Syria — especially as the rebels’ main supporters are Iran’s Persian Gulf rivals: Qatar and Saudi Arabia.

b) Strategy: For Iran, Syria is also a strategically key ally. It’s Iran’s main conduit to the Shiite militia Hezbollah in Lebanon, the proxy through which Iran can threaten Israel with an arsenal of short-range missiles.

In 2009, the top U.S. diplomat in Damascus disclosed that Syria had begun delivery of ballistic missiles to Hezbollah, according to official cables leaked to and published by WikiLeaks.

So, it’s in Iran’s interest to see al-Assad’s regime remain intact.

Western intelligence officials believe the Islamic Republic has provided technical help such as intelligence, communications and advice on crowd control and weapons as protests in Syria morphed into resistance.

A U.N. panel reported in May that Iranian weapons destined for Syria but seized in Turkey included assault rifles, explosives, detonators, machine guns and mortar shells.

Ayham Kamel of Eurasia Group believes the Iranians must be alarmed that the tide is turning against al-Assad.

“Iran probably has excellent information regarding Assad’s position. That information would make clear that Iran is increasingly likely to lose its only ally in the region, greatly reducing its strategic reach,” he said.

What’s it saying:

Iran has cast events in Syria as part of a much broader ideological battle. It’s a “war between the front of hegemony and the front of resistance,” Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has said.

Iran’s position, as outlined by Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and new President Hassan Rouhani, is that the Syrian government is a victim of international plots.

Iran believes the West and almost all Arab countries are in cahoots in an effort to implement regime change in Syria. Iran says the main objective of this plot is to make the region safer for Israel.

This week, Zarif warned of “graver conditions” in Syria is attacked.

“If any country attacks another when it wants, that is like the Middle Ages,” Zarif said Wednesday.

Why it matters:

Many believe Iran is Washington’s greatest threat in the region, especially with its nuclear potential. It’s unclear how Iran might respond if Syria is attacked. But the rhetoric certainly has been ominous.

“Starting this fire will be like a spark in a large store of gunpowder, with unclear and unspecified outcomes and consequences,” Khamenei told Iranian Cabinet members this week.

“The U.S. threats and possible intervention in Syria is a disaster for the region and if such an act is done, certainly, the Americans will sustain damage like when they interfered in Iraq and Afghanistan.”
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178708 Sep 1, 2013
Why Russia, Iran and China are defending Syria

Allegations of a chemical weapons attack carried out by the Syrian regime last week have heightened tensions internationally. There’s been tough talk from Western leaders and a flurry of activity by the United States — all of which seem to suggest that a military strike against the regime could be in the offing. But through it all, Syria seems to retain the support of some good friends. Why do Russia, Iran and China continue to support a regime that’s accused of slaughtering tens of thousands of civilians in the 2-year-old civil war? Here’s why.

CHINA

Why it cares:

China’s relationship with Syria is more nuanced.

Some say it wants to maintain its financial ties. It was ranked as Syria’s third-largest importer in 2010, according to data from the European Commission.

“Beijing’s renewed interest in Damascus — the traditional terminus node of the ancient Silk Road … indicates that China sees Syria as an important trading hub,” according to a 2010 report from The Jamestown Foundation, a Washington-based research and analysis institute.

But there’s a bigger factor at play.

China has said foreign countries shouldn’t meddle in Syria’s internal affairs — and perhaps for good reason. China has had its own share of international controversies over its policies with Tibet as well as allegations of human rights violations.

Finally, China doesn’t want to reprise what happened with Libya.

It abstained from a U.N. Security Council resolution on that one, clearing the way for a NATO military intervention in Libya.

“It was rather disappointed with the payoff,” said Yun Sun of the Brookings Institution, writing in the East-West Center’s Asia Pacific Bulletin.“Neither the West nor the NTC (Libyan National Transitional Council) showed much appreciation for China’s abstention.”

So, he says, China has “formulated a far more sophisticated hedging strategy” when it comes to Syria.

“Rather than siding with either Assad or the opposition and standing aside to ‘wait and see,’ Beijing is actively betting on both.”

What’s it saying:

China said it is firmly opposed to the use of chemical weapons and supports the U.N.’s chemical weapons inspectors.

It also said it wants a political solution for Syria — though some say hopes for such an ending have waned.

“A political solution is always the only realistic means to resolve the Syria issue,” Foreign Minister Wang Yi said.

Like Russia, China also walked out of Wednesday’s U.N. Security Council meeting where Britain planned to pursue a resolution on Syria.

Why it matters:

China is a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council. And like Russia, China has repeatedly blocked sanctions attempts against the Syrian regime — leading to a perpetual stalemate at the U.N. body to take any serious action on Syria. CNN
American Lady

Danville, KY

#178709 Sep 1, 2013
Justice Dale wrote:
<quoted text>LMAO!!! Missed, I have been kicked off all US News threads for weeks, guess I pissed them off!!!
Oh, well!!! I guess this what you get for speaking the truth!!!
Sorry to hear that!
Was definitely wondering about you :)
I have had "selective censorship"
used on me!

They can't STAND the TRUTH!
Hope to see you more!

Good Night
Sleep Well ...

:)
Quirky

Broomfield, CO

#178710 Sep 2, 2013
Gee, Where`s the lil Ckscker Vorenus/A-12/X-wussy tonight? He certainly don`t have to get up for work in the morning. Must be whacking her stack of Ch!t. lololol
Quirky

Broomfield, CO

#178711 Sep 2, 2013
American Lady wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry to hear that!
Was definitely wondering about you :)
I have had "selective censorship"
used on me!
They can't STAND the TRUTH!
Hope to see you more!
Good Night
Sleep Well ...
:)
:)
American Lady

Danville, KY

#178712 Sep 2, 2013
Good Night *Patriots*...
Hope everyone has a nice Labor Day!:)

Night Sir William ;~)

Thanks for another day of GREAT posts ...
Quirky

Broomfield, CO

#178713 Sep 2, 2013
American Lady wrote:
Good Night *Patriots*...
Hope everyone has a nice Labor Day!:)
Night Sir William ;~)
Thanks for another day of GREAT posts ...
I snuck a kiss on the neck while William was not looking ..lolol
Quirky

Broomfield, CO

#178714 Sep 2, 2013
Cruise Missiles need to be sent to a major part of southern California from Martinez on down south.
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178715 Sep 2, 2013
American Lady wrote:
Good Night *Patriots*...
Hope everyone has a nice Labor Day!:)
Night Sir William ;~)
Thanks for another day of GREAT posts ...
YVMW maam.<hat-tip>
Sir William Ferrell

Jacksonville, FL

#178716 Sep 2, 2013
LOL

Look what I found.

"Assad using chemical weapons" DIDN't ACTUALLY HAPPEN ?

It's just a lie that is being used by the American government and western media to justify American military intervention in Syria ?

Russian Propaganda Film?

…

The Syrian Diary: Russian Documentary from TV Rossiya 24

This exclusive documentary by Russian TV station, Rossiya 24, is a "must watch" as it gives a very good insight into the events that have been taking place in Syria since 2011. It shows how both the Syrian Army and the Syrian people are defending their country Syria from unimaginable crimes committed by extremist terrorists who operate with massive international media, military, intelligence, and financial support, a situation that no one would ever want to be in.

Warning: Contains graphic footage, 18+, not for shock, aimed only at documenting events in Syria and crimes of FSA terrorists

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