The President has failed us

The President has failed us

There are 336713 comments on the Times News story from Jun 9, 2012, titled The President has failed us. In it, Times News reports that:

This week, I decided to list the reasons I would not vote for Barack Obama in the next election.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Times News.

Rico from east LA

Los Angeles, CA

#249371 Mar 12, 2014
---Wild Irish Rose--- wrote:
<quoted text>
ROTFLMAO at you!
I have no socks, you liar. And you threaten no one here, and certainly not me, little girl. LOL!
Quit lying about people and harassing them just to get attention.
still suffering Labia Gigantism I see?

“you know i know”

Since: Oct 07

denver

#249372 Mar 12, 2014
NTRPRNR1 wrote:
<quoted text>You took the phone calls and did the hiring, and for this "spot" in life, you try to pass yourself off as a one percenter? LOL Pu-leeezzzeee.
I'm laughing. You're telling us that you didn't require a personnel department or human resources? You're a one percenter who said things like "Hit the road Jack."
Did you also sell swampland?
What's Il Douche lying about today?

“you know i know”

Since: Oct 07

denver

#249373 Mar 12, 2014
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>wow! that didn't work as i wanted it to? how did my old post get one there? i was pretty sure i was replying to Teaman's comment.....what the helll?
drunk again is my guess

Level 6

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#249374 Mar 12, 2014
---Wild Irish Rose--- wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL! I swear, some people. He's a game player just trying to feel important.
So boring.
I've been reading your posts about Putin and Ukraine, Jax. Very helpful and informative. So what's in Ukraine that is so valuable to Russia? Is it oil?
First and foremost, as in Syria, Russia is more concerned about what happens to its Black Sea naval base(s) if the governments in these countries become more independent and friendlier toward the west.

In Syria that means propping up a dictator that is friendly toward Russia.

In Crimea, it simply means making a land grab, because the former government of the Ukraine which was in many ways a puppet to the Putin regime has been overthrown and the new government is much more pro-western.

There are a lot of other concerns, but those bases are what Russia is willing to fight to keep.
Barney Fwank n Beans

Murrieta, CA

#249375 Mar 12, 2014
harmonious wrote:
<quoted text>drunk again is my guess
It never sobers up, just like granny tranny Tammy Fay Mary Kay
Barney Fwank n Beans

Murrieta, CA

#249376 Mar 12, 2014
Quirky wrote:
<quoted text>
He was a real drama case when he was in Denver!
he hangs around Barry, smokes blunts at the WH

“Try Reuters.”

Level 8

Since: Mar 07

Location hidden

#249377 Mar 12, 2014
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>how is a very pro russian part of the Ukraine going back to russia going to destabalize europe?
the other eastern european countries are not so pro russian, so your previous reference to them doesn't really hold the same as this example...
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb /eastern-europe-expresses-conc ern-about-russian-aggression/

Eastern Europe expresses concern about Russian aggression
March 11, 2014

GWEN IFILL: The crisis in the Ukraine, which has pitted Europe and the U.S. against a re-expanding Russia, entered a new phase today.

War games began in Poland today, as U.S. and Polish forces performed joint air and naval exercises. They were long-planned, but have now become part of the U.S. response to Russia’s seizing much of Crimea, a Ukrainian region where ethnic Russians predominate.

Russian President Vladimir Putin suggested last week he could intervene elsewhere as well.

PRESIDENT VLADIMIR PUTIN, Russia (through interpreter): If we see that lawlessness starting in eastern regions too, if people ask us for help, we reserve the right to use all options at our disposal to protect those citizens.

GWEN IFILL: On Friday’s NewsHour, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Martin Dempsey said such action would be dangerous.

GEN. MARTIN DEMPSEY, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff: If Russia is allowed to do this, which is to say move into a sovereign country under the guise of protecting ethnic Russians in — in Ukraine, it exposes Eastern Europe to some significant risk, because there are ethnic enclaves all over Eastern Europe and the Balkans.

GWEN IFILL: Indeed, much of Eastern Ukraine does have sizable Russian-speaking populations.

And other nations in the region, including Moldova, Belarus, and the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia, are also home to large numbers of ethnic Russians. This isn’t the first time Moscow has moved to annex regions beyond its borders. During the Five Days War in 2008, Russia effectively gained control over portions of neighboring Georgia.

Estonia’s foreign minister said today the entire continent should be concerned.

(CONT.)

..........

This interview transcript is undoubtedly a more comprehensive and competent assessment of the situation than I could try and summarize. I hope it's helpful to you and anybody else who has the same questions.
Level 1

Since: Jan 11

Bordentown, NJ

#249378 Mar 12, 2014
Rico from east LA wrote:
<quoted text>Your old wrinkled micro penis don't work either
Sorry to hear that. So, then what happened? Did you go home, or what?

Level 9

Since: Jun 10

Fremont, CA

#249379 Mar 12, 2014
Jaxxon wrote:
<quoted text>
First and foremost, as in Syria, Russia is more concerned about what happens to its Black Sea naval base(s) if the governments in these countries become more independent and friendlier toward the west.
In Syria that means propping up a dictator that is friendly toward Russia.
In Crimea, it simply means making a land grab, because the former government of the Ukraine which was in many ways a puppet to the Putin regime has been overthrown and the new government is much more pro-western.
There are a lot of other concerns, but those bases are what Russia is willing to fight to keep.
Wow, and Putin's attitude seems to be the rest of the world be damned. I think he's trying to recreate the Soviet Union single handedly.

I wonder where China stands on this issue.
Level 1

Since: Jan 11

Bordentown, NJ

#249380 Mar 12, 2014
Rico from east LA wrote:
<quoted text>still suffering Labia Gigantism I see?
It only seems that way, micro.
Level 1

Since: Jan 11

Bordentown, NJ

#249381 Mar 12, 2014
---Wild Irish Rose--- wrote:
<quoted text>
Wow, and Putin's attitude seems to be the rest of the world be damned. I think he's trying to recreate the Soviet Union single handedly.
I wonder where China stands on this issue.
China has their own ambitions.

Since: Mar 11

St. Croix valley

#249382 Mar 12, 2014
NTRPRNR1 wrote:
<quoted text> http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/eastern-europe...
Eastern Europe expresses concern about Russian aggression
March 11, 2014
GWEN IFILL: The crisis in the Ukraine, which has pitted Europe and the U.S. against a re-expanding Russia, entered a new phase today.
War games began in Poland today, as U.S. and Polish forces performed joint air and naval exercises. They were long-planned, but have now become part of the U.S. response to Russia’s seizing much of Crimea, a Ukrainian region where ethnic Russians predominate.
Russian President Vladimir Putin suggested last week he could intervene elsewhere as well.
PRESIDENT VLADIMIR PUTIN, Russia (through interpreter): If we see that lawlessness starting in eastern regions too, if people ask us for help, we reserve the right to use all options at our disposal to protect those citizens.
GWEN IFILL: On Friday’s NewsHour, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Martin Dempsey said such action would be dangerous.
GEN. MARTIN DEMPSEY, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff: If Russia is allowed to do this, which is to say move into a sovereign country under the guise of protecting ethnic Russians in — in Ukraine, it exposes Eastern Europe to some significant risk, because there are ethnic enclaves all over Eastern Europe and the Balkans.
GWEN IFILL: Indeed, much of Eastern Ukraine does have sizable Russian-speaking populations.
And other nations in the region, including Moldova, Belarus, and the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia, are also home to large numbers of ethnic Russians. This isn’t the first time Moscow has moved to annex regions beyond its borders. During the Five Days War in 2008, Russia effectively gained control over portions of neighboring Georgia.
Estonia’s foreign minister said today the entire continent should be concerned.
(CONT.)
..........
This interview transcript is undoubtedly a more comprehensive and competent assessment of the situation than I could try and summarize. I hope it's helpful to you and anybody else who has the same questions.
don't confuse russian speaking with pro-russian. there are many parts of the Ukraine that align themselves as more russian than ukraine. the Crimea is one such region.

the Ukraine will not stay as it is for long. it will split into different states within my lifetime. i think we are seeing the beginning of that now.

Level 6

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#249383 Mar 12, 2014
---Wild Irish Rose--- wrote:
<quoted text>
Wow, and Putin's attitude seems to be the rest of the world be damned. I think he's trying to recreate the Soviet Union single handedly.
I wonder where China stands on this issue.
China has issued a statement that the territorial integrity of the Ukraine must be respected, but that's as far as they've gone in public so far.

If Russia moves into other parts of Ukraine the Chinese will most likely be a little more assertive, but if it stops with Crimea, they will probably be willing to live with it.

This article does a good job of explaining what's actually going on inside Russia.

Ukraine crisis: Russians opposed to Putin
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-26531310

Putin is playing to Russia's nationalistic tendencies to strengthen his position at home and it appears to be working.

His popularity is soaring, the voice of opposition is being met with physical violence and detractors have been labeled traitors and fascists.

Russia feels slighted by the west. They resent not being seen and treated as the world power they once were and they are tired of feeling like the bastard child of greater Europe.

It's the same mentality that existed in Germany following the first world war and just like the German's of that time, the Russian people are willing to follow a charismatic strongman as long as it makes them feel better about themselves with little or no regard about what the rest of the world thinks.

One thing to take note of. The Duma voted Sunday to give Putin the authority to take military action anywhere inside the borders of the Ukraine, not just Crimea and a large portion of the population now supports sending troops straight to Kiev because they are believing the propaganda.

Level 9

Since: Jun 10

Fremont, CA

#249384 Mar 12, 2014
Teaman wrote:
<quoted text>
China has their own ambitions.
Which has been purely economic for decades. They know how to use diplomacy to their advantage.

Russia may find ally in China -- albeit a passive one for now

By Jaime A. FlorCruz and Paul Armstrong, CNN

Thu March 6, 2014

Beijing (CNN)-- Vladimir Putin is seeking China's support in Russia's standoff with Western powers over Ukraine. In a rare phone conversation, Putin briefed his counterpart in Beijing, President Xi Jinping, on "Russia's position on the issue and measures Russia had taken to tackle the crisis," the state-controlled Xinhua news agency reported Wednesday.
President Xi said the situation in Ukraine is "highly complicated and sensitive," which "seems to be accidental,(but) has the elements of the inevitable."

He added that China believes Russia can "push for the political settlement of the issue so as to safeguard regional and world peace and stability" and he "supports proposals and mediation efforts of the international community that are conducive to the reduction of tension."

The Chinese leader's comments followed similarly guarded statements by Chinese diplomats earlier this week, which neither criticized nor supported Moscow's actions over Ukraine.
Unsurprisingly, Russia has attempted to depict China's position as more supportive than it actually is.

In describing an earlier phone call between the foreign ministers of China and Russia, the foreign ministry in Moscow said Monday that there was "a broad convergence of views between Russia and China in connection to the situation in Ukraine and around it."

In fact, China's foreign ministry spokesman provided more nuanced statements. "It is China's longstanding position not to interfere in others' internal affairs," Qin Gang said in a regular press briefing over the weekend. "We respect the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine.".....(cont.)

http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/05/world/asia/chin...
Billy WellHung Wang

Los Angeles, CA

#249385 Mar 12, 2014
NTRPRNR1 wrote:
<quoted text> http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/eastern-europe...
Eastern Europe expresses concern about Russian aggression
March 11, 2014
GWEN IFILL: The crisis in the Ukraine, which has pitted Europe and the U.S. against a re-expanding Russia, entered a new phase today.
War games began in Poland today, as U.S. and Polish forces performed joint air and naval exercises. They were long-planned, but have now become part of the U.S. response to Russia’s seizing much of Crimea, a Ukrainian region where ethnic Russians predominate.
Russian President Vladimir Putin suggested last week he could intervene elsewhere as well.
PRESIDENT VLADIMIR PUTIN, Russia (through interpreter): If we see that lawlessness starting in eastern regions too, if people ask us for help, we reserve the right to use all options at our disposal to protect those citizens.
GWEN IFILL: On Friday’s NewsHour, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Martin Dempsey said such action would be dangerous.
GEN. MARTIN DEMPSEY, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff: If Russia is allowed to do this, which is to say move into a sovereign country under the guise of protecting ethnic Russians in — in Ukraine, it exposes Eastern Europe to some significant risk, because there are ethnic enclaves all over Eastern Europe and the Balkans.
GWEN IFILL: Indeed, much of Eastern Ukraine does have sizable Russian-speaking populations.
And other nations in the region, including Moldova, Belarus, and the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia, are also home to large numbers of ethnic Russians. This isn’t the first time Moscow has moved to annex regions beyond its borders. During the Five Days War in 2008, Russia effectively gained control over portions of neighboring Georgia.
Estonia’s foreign minister said today the entire continent should be concerned.
(CONT.)
..........
This interview transcript is undoubtedly a more comprehensive and competent assessment of the situation than I could try and summarize. I hope it's helpful to you and anybody else who has the same questions.
good evening Sir
freebird

Long Beach, CA

#249386 Mar 12, 2014
Jaxxon wrote:
<quoted text>
"Because of dumbasses like you."
Okay ya stupid fk wad.
You asked me a question and I answered you. I've been respectful and I've been very clear about what I'm trying to say and for the second day in a row you're calling me names because I don't see this the same way you do.
Choke on it and die for all I care. You're no better than the rest of the trolls around here.
You don't need to start calling me names, just because you don't agree with me. We are all adults on here, so just admit that I'm right and you are wrong. Just because I call illegal aliens vermin should be no concern of yours. How about reading the definition of vermin and maybe you will agree, but I won't hold my breath. My problem with people like you is, you say you are against illegal immigration, but have a shit fit when people like me are being lied to constantly by our government, and they get paid by the taxpayers, but refuse to do anything about the illegal aliens except aid and abet them. Then people like you give them a pass. That's why I called you and others like you a dumbass. Notice how you don't mind saying disrespectful things to me, but oh god forbid if I blow off a little steam against illegal aliens.

Level 6

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#249387 Mar 12, 2014
woodtick57 wrote:
<quoted text>don't confuse russian speaking with pro-russian. there are many parts of the Ukraine that align themselves as more russian than ukraine. the Crimea is one such region.
the Ukraine will not stay as it is for long. it will split into different states within my lifetime. i think we are seeing the beginning of that now.
This is not an organic situation woodtick.

The Ukraine is not breaking up on its own. A stronger nation, not willing to accept the will of the Ukrainian people to determine their own destiny, has intervened in violation of international law and simply seized control of a large portion of that country.

This Sunday their will be a referendum in Crimea. One of the problems is, there is no option on the ballot to stay with the Ukraine.

The two options are, become part of Russia this way, or become part of Russia that way.

Will you consider the results of that vote to be legitimate?

You've already said that you believe Russia will continue to attempt to retake their former satellites, but then you say this is no big deal in Crimea. Which is it?

Your take on this whole things simply seems naďve to me.

We have a chance to take action now. That opportunity may not last long and it may not come again.
Level 1

Since: Jan 11

Bordentown, NJ

#249388 Mar 12, 2014
---Wild Irish Rose--- wrote:
<quoted text>
Which has been purely economic for decades. They know how to use diplomacy to their advantage.
Russia may find ally in China -- albeit a passive one for now
By Jaime A. FlorCruz and Paul Armstrong, CNN
Thu March 6, 2014
Beijing (CNN)-- Vladimir Putin is seeking China's support in Russia's standoff with Western powers over Ukraine. In a rare phone conversation, Putin briefed his counterpart in Beijing, President Xi Jinping, on "Russia's position on the issue and measures Russia had taken to tackle the crisis," the state-controlled Xinhua news agency reported Wednesday.
President Xi said the situation in Ukraine is "highly complicated and sensitive," which "seems to be accidental,(but) has the elements of the inevitable."
He added that China believes Russia can "push for the political settlement of the issue so as to safeguard regional and world peace and stability" and he "supports proposals and mediation efforts of the international community that are conducive to the reduction of tension."
The Chinese leader's comments followed similarly guarded statements by Chinese diplomats earlier this week, which neither criticized nor supported Moscow's actions over Ukraine.
Unsurprisingly, Russia has attempted to depict China's position as more supportive than it actually is.
In describing an earlier phone call between the foreign ministers of China and Russia, the foreign ministry in Moscow said Monday that there was "a broad convergence of views between Russia and China in connection to the situation in Ukraine and around it."
In fact, China's foreign ministry spokesman provided more nuanced statements. "It is China's longstanding position not to interfere in others' internal affairs," Qin Gang said in a regular press briefing over the weekend. "We respect the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine.".....(cont.)
http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/05/world/asia/chin...
Yea, I know. It says they really don't care, they have their eyes on Taiwan and a few islands near Japan.

But you're right, they're mostly about financial interests. Once they become a financial super power, who knows.

Level 9

Since: Jun 10

Fremont, CA

#249389 Mar 12, 2014
West, did you really expect Russia to ignore Ukraine chaos?

By Alexander Nekrassov, former Kremlin adviser

Wed March 5, 2014

Editor's note: Alexander Nekrassov is a Russian commentator and former Russian presidential and government adviser. The views expressed in this commentary are his own.

(CNN)-- Lots of stern-faced Western politicians and so-called experts have been asking: what is Russian President Vladimir Putin's endgame in Ukraine?

The presence of Russian troops in Crimea has sent alarm bells ringing in Western capitals, with some people predicting that it is basically a prelude to a full-blown invasion of predominantly Russian speaking eastern parts of the country, with Russian tanks rolling in. Calls were also made for the "world community," whatever that means these days, to punish Russia economically and diplomatically, although no one is talking about any military response.

Very hard to see though how Western countries can exert serious economic pressure on Russia, considering the state of their economies and possible huge losses they will incur. Symbolically, yes, they can, say, cancel some business conferences and maybe even refuse to sign a deal or two. But that would be all. We have already found out the British government is not considering any military options or trade sanctions after a cunning cameramen picked up an official carrying a policy document near 10 Downing Street, zooming in on the relevant paragraph.

Although, as a former Kremlin adviser, I can tell you that such things don't happen by accident and usually have all to do with sending out a signal to those who are watching carefully. Other countries have also signaled their lack of any desire to resort to sanctions.

U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry have been warning Russia about costs and punishments, if it does not withdraw its troops back to the Black Sea naval base in Sevastopol. The White House has been saying that economic sanctions against Russia are in the making and that all military programs between the two countries are on hold. Other suggested punishments being looked at include boycotting the G8 summits in Sochi in June and even banning Russia altogether from this gathering, which, incidentally, has been losing its relevance in the past decade or so. I mean, who is going to treat seriously the supposed group of the biggest industrial nations if it doesn't include China and India but has Canada and Italy in it, no offence to these two great nations.

The thing about the crisis in Ukraine is that the West has greatly misjudged the way Russia would respond to the possibility of its neighbor sliding into chaos and anarchy, with the so-called interim unity government in Kiev failing to establish its authority in the east and south of the country. Not to mention that the children of the Orange revolution of 2004, which, by the way, eventually ended in tears for most of them, have swallowed more than they can chew when they toppled President Viktor Yanukovich, and then made a crucial mistake of making all the wrong noises from day one, demonstrating open hostility to Russia and to the ethnic Russians living in Ukraine.....(cont.)

http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/04/opinion/ukraine...
Barney Fwank n Beans

Murrieta, CA

#249391 Mar 12, 2014
freebird wrote:
<quoted text>
You don't need to start calling me names, just because you don't agree with me. We are all adults on here, so just admit that I'm right and you are wrong. Just because I call illegal aliens vermin should be no concern of yours. How about reading the definition of vermin and maybe you will agree, but I won't hold my breath. My problem with people like you is, you say you are against illegal immigration, but have a shit fit when people like me are being lied to constantly by our government, and they get paid by the taxpayers, but refuse to do anything about the illegal aliens except aid and abet them. Then people like you give them a pass. That's why I called you and others like you a dumbass. Notice how you don't mind saying disrespectful things to me, but oh god forbid if I blow off a little steam against illegal aliens.
Shockingly well said

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