Voices: 'Hispanic' is poor way to des...

Voices: 'Hispanic' is poor way to describe rich cultures

There are 26 comments on the Wausau Daily Herald story from Feb 6, 2014, titled Voices: 'Hispanic' is poor way to describe rich cultures. In it, Wausau Daily Herald reports that:

As I finished an interview with a state senator in northern Florida, he suggested I try out a Mexican restaurant a few blocks away.

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wild child

Brooklyn, NY

#1 Feb 7, 2014
Bring it back to where it belongs.
Star Saphire

Newton, NJ

#2 Feb 7, 2014
As I finished an interview with a state senator in northern Florida, he suggested I try out a Mexican restaurant a few blocks away.

"You'll love it," he said. "Two blocks down, on the left."

I thanked him for the suggestion, but pointed out that I was of Cuban descent, not Mexican. He paused, gave me a quizzical stare and said, "Uh huh. Two blocks down, on the left."

When I had that conversation years ago, I thought his reaction was merely fodder for a funny story to tell my relatives back home in Miami. Over the years, though, I came to realize that the unwillingness of this well-educated man who worked in a statehouse filled with people from Puerto Rico, Cuba, Mexico and a slew of other Hispanic countries to recognize one Hispanic country from another was not an isolated mistake.

The United States government adopted the term "Hispanic" in the 1970s as a way to broadly define people from countries with Spanish origins (some definitions also include countries with Portuguese origins, namely Brazil).

While it has its uses when examining broad population patterns in the U.S., it has also become a lazy way for Americans to describe the more than 580 million people living to our south.

That vague term ignores the vast differences that exist among Hispanics from different countries. They grow up in different circumstances and in different cultures. They flourish and struggle in different economies, confront different kinds of crime and immigrate to the United States for different reasons.

Venezuelans and Cubans flee oppressive governments. Guatemalans, Hondurans and Salvadorans run from violent drug wars. Brazilians and Argentines choose to invest their fortunes in the American economy rather than their own. Mexicans, Nicaraguans and Peruvians want a job that will help them feed their families.

Even those descriptions grossly over-simplify the wide variety of reasons people leave their home countries. But they begin to explain just how varied our neighbors truly are.

Some cities have long histories with large Hispanic populations, leaving their residents more aware of the differences. But outside of places like Los Angeles, New York, Chicago and Miami, many Americans are just starting to understand.

"They tend to clump someone who speaks Spanish with tacos or soccer or Mexican food," said Fernand Amandi, a managing partner at Bendixen & Amandi International, a Miami-based communications and market research firm that has studied the Hispanic population throughout the U.S.

"More and more, as these communities assert themselves, there's greater appreciation for the nuances and the distinctions of the different Hispanics that make up the fabric of America."

Is this simply a game of political correctness? No. The distinctions matter. Imagine asking a British person about the nuances of Italian pasta. Or blaming a Frenchman for starting World War II. The differences can be profound and are critical as more and more Hispanics immigrate to, and start families in, the United States.

Hispanics are having profound and growing influence on elections, and how political parties respond to the distinctions among Hispanics will dictate their success. Immigration reform is currently one of the hottest topics on Capitol Hill, and a potential key issue for voters in this November's midterm elections. That influence will ultimately affect immigration policy, school curricula, health care, the economy and many other important issues we face each day.

Perhaps most importantly, as the Hispanic population continues to grow, your family in Nebraska or New York City is more likely to have a neighbor from Paraguay or Peru.

Understanding the basic idea of where they come from is a first step.
Star Saphire

Newton, NJ

#3 Feb 7, 2014
It's like lumping together British, Americans, Jamaicans, Australians Bahamians........Different cultures, different races, different ethnicities.
Dee Dee Dee

Emmaus, PA

#4 Feb 7, 2014
"Hispanic" people are being played for political power pure and simple. A small group of politicians, business owners and other power brokers realized that by lumping all "Hispanic" cultures under one "ethnic" group they could exploit the all of the groups as one.
Diplomat

Newton, NJ

#5 Feb 7, 2014
Dee Dee Dee wrote:
"Hispanic" people are being played for political power pure and simple. A small group of politicians, business owners and other power brokers realized that by lumping all "Hispanic" cultures under one "ethnic" group they could exploit the all of the groups as one.
Doesn't work, many so called hispanics are offended by the common garbage can designation.
Dee Dee Dee

Emmaus, PA

#6 Feb 7, 2014
Diplomat wrote:
<quoted text>
Doesn't work, many so called hispanics are offended by the common garbage can designation.
You wouldn't know that based on statements "Hispanic" organizations, politicians or the media.
Jose

San Francisco, CA

#7 Feb 8, 2014
NCLR . org !!!

“Its all in the mind..or is it?”

Level 1

Since: Dec 06

Location hidden

#8 Feb 8, 2014

“CUBA Y PUERTO RICO HERMANOS”

Since: Dec 06

Marco Island,Florida

#9 Feb 8, 2014
Cherokee wrote:
http://news.google.com/newspap ers?nid=1291&dat=20000429 &id=AylUAAAAIBAJ&sjid= Z44DAAAAIBAJ&pg=4132,37679 13
Hey turd,stop posting your XXX gay videos!!!

“Its all in the mind..or is it?”

Level 1

Since: Dec 06

Location hidden

#10 Feb 8, 2014
cono balsero, where did they give you your engineering diploma? did you get it In a cereal box? Did you check the link? It talks about what you Cubans have done to this beautiful city, and yes it could be described as something dirty in a moral way. Not in a sexual way which is what all your mind is able do discern.

“CUBA Y PUERTO RICO HERMANOS”

Since: Dec 06

Marco Island,Florida

#11 Feb 8, 2014
Cherokee wrote:
cono balsero, where did they give you your engineering diploma? did you get it In a cereal box? Did you check the link? It talks about what you Cubans have done to this beautiful city, and yes it could be described as something dirty in a moral way. Not in a sexual way which is what all your mind is able do discern.
JAJAJA Que envidioso eres enano acomplejado!!!
wachu

Miami, FL

#12 Feb 8, 2014
no balserito eso esta en tu mente. pobrecito eres tu, pobrecito de corazon Cristiano barato lleno de odio

saludame al modelo de tu esposa AKA el pellejo, debe ser por eso que te envidian, por ella...

que tal se vive en el islote llamado Puerto Rico balcerdo?

quasy 56 !!
wachu

Miami, FL

#13 Feb 8, 2014
InterAmerican's cofounder, Manuel Morante Jr (Cubaniche)., once served a year of probation after being charged with armed robbery and resisting arrest with violence. The academy is accredited by an agency that the U.S. Department of Education does not recognize and that a watchdog site terms a "fake." But according to attendance records filed with the state, it has "enrolled" 230 students during its 17-month existence. At least 88 graduates have used its diplomas and bogus transcripts to gain admittance to Miami Dade College, according to that institution's registrar.(Florida International University is apparently pickier. It has admitted no one from InterAmerican.)

There's no telling how many of Florida's 1,713 private schools which educate a third of a million students are run like InterAmerican.

They are thinking of also offering Engineering courses there in the near future. The Cuban picked to be the main teacher lives in Puerto Rico and goes by the name of WJDC...

More here:

http://www.miaminewtimes.com/2011-06-02/news/...

“Its all in the mind..or is it?”

Level 1

Since: Dec 06

Location hidden

#14 Feb 8, 2014
In the 1980s, Miami became one of the United States' largest transshipment point for cocaine from Colombia, Bolivia, and Peru.[35] The drug industry brought billions of dollars into Miami, which were quickly funneled through front organizations into the local economy. Luxury car dealerships, five-star hotels, condominium developments, swanky nightclubs, major commercial developments and other signs of prosperity began rising all over the city. As the money arrived, so did a violent crime wave that lasted through the early 1990s. The popular television program Miami Vice, which dealt with counter-narcotics agents in an idyllic upper-class rendition of Miami, spread the city's image as one of America's most glamorous subtropical paradises.

Balsero money from drugs fueled Miami's economy. Not you Cubans. get over it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Miami

“CUBA Y PUERTO RICO HERMANOS”

Since: Dec 06

Marco Island,Florida

#15 Feb 8, 2014
Cherokee wrote:
In the 1980s, Miami became one of the United States' largest transshipment point for cocaine from Colombia, Bolivia, and Peru.[35] The drug industry brought billions of dollars into Miami, which were quickly funneled through front organizations into the local economy. Luxury car dealerships, five-star hotels, condominium developments, swanky nightclubs, major commercial developments and other signs of prosperity began rising all over the city. As the money arrived, so did a violent crime wave that lasted through the early 1990s. Thhe popular television program Miami Vice, which dealt with counter-narcotics agents in an idyllic upper-class rendition of Miami, spread the city's image as one of America's most glamorous subtropical paradises.
Balsero money from drugs fueled Miami's economy. Not you Cubans. get over it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Miami
"Colombia, Bolivia, and Peru."
Cuevas de indigenas....LOL!!?

“Its all in the mind..or is it?”

Level 1

Since: Dec 06

Location hidden

#16 Feb 8, 2014
eres un Cristiano ejemplar. Ejemplarizas mediocridad y bajesa
IndigenaBuster

United States

#17 Feb 8, 2014
Cherokee wrote:
eres un Cristiano ejemplar. Ejemplarizas mediocridad y bajesa
BESTIA...'bajeZa' se escribre con 'Z' como en ... enano Zapingo...Caballero que bruto es este sin gao indigena!
yep

Toronto, Canada

#18 Feb 8, 2014
Rich cultures of drug cultivating.
Jitano vuster

Miami, FL

#19 Feb 8, 2014
IndigenaBuster wrote:
<quoted text>
BESTIA...'bajeZa' se escribre con 'Z' como en ... enano Zapingo...Caballero que bruto es este sin gao indigena!
camarada usted aze mas errores que naiden aca. Ponte unos bluyines y una guallavera negra de las que bende cheroke y baya a singar!!
Jitano vuster

Miami, FL

#20 Feb 8, 2014
WE JUST DONT CARE wrote:
<quoted text>
"Colombia, Bolivia, and Peru."
Cuevas de indigenas....LOL!!?
y Cuva la reina de las prostitutas

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