State Department Condemns Anti-Gay Legislation In Russia

Nov 26, 2011 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Towleroad

The United States' State Department has strongly condemned odious new legislation in St.

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“The cow herder of Montenegro”

Since: Jan 10

Loved everywhere

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#1
Nov 26, 2011
 

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Yankees should go f...themselves !

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

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#2
Nov 26, 2011
 

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Pesky army wrote:
Yankees should go f...themselves !
AbeUG, Anti Ukraine and STD UGX are already doing that together all the time.
Lukashenko is Dr Phil

Finland

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#3
Nov 26, 2011
 

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So I take it pouk the peasant and UG geezer are behind this condemination. Pukra protested loudly.

“The cow herder of Montenegro”

Since: Jan 10

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#4
Nov 26, 2011
 

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Everyone in here knows it.
Somehow, these three musketeers always deny it.
The other day, Smelly Town had hinted about Puke´s roughness.
kaputnik

United States

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#5
Nov 26, 2011
 

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This Russian Anti-Gay Bill Is Nothing Short Of Medieval Barbarity

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/26/this...

In November 2011 St Petersburg shocked the world. The legislative assembly approved, in its first reading, a bill which outlawed the promotion of homosexuality, transsexuality and paedophilia to minors. The passage of the bill provoked a quick reaction from local LGBT activists, who organised several protests against the initiative. It also mobilised the international community. The bill was condemned by MEPs, the US state department and thousands of people from around the world, who signed an online petition against its implementation.

St Petersburg, which is deemed the cultural capital of Russia, the place where many famous gay people created our artistic heritage, entered into the 21st century's hall of shame by drifting into medieval barbarity.
ronan

UK

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#6
Nov 26, 2011
 

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I fail to see how a law passed in Russia could be of any interest in America. It's all about sovereignty.
Russia is a sovereign country and is allowed to make legislation without any comment from abroad.
I hope the US State Department could also comment on internal laws in Saudi Arabia... Or maybe they consider Sharia Law acceptable, with public beheading?

“Gay & Proud & Lawfully Married”

Since: Jan 07

Porterville CA

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#7
Nov 27, 2011
 

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I think the US needs to look real hard in the mirror before they condemn other countries. ie DOMA

Since: Dec 08

Toronto, ON, Canada

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#8
Nov 27, 2011
 

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Brock93257 wrote:
I think the US needs to look real hard in the mirror before they condemn other countries. ie DOMA
Not to defend the US, which I always feel free to criticize, but your post is a bit naive. The State Department is the executive branch. It has nothing to do with DOMA which is a law passed by Congress. As part of the executive branch it reports to Obama who is certainly gay-friendly if not always effective. I doubt a Republican controlled Congress would pass a resolution condemning this law, though I might be proved wrong.

Since: Dec 08

Toronto, ON, Canada

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#9
Nov 27, 2011
 

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kaputnik wrote:
This Russian Anti-Gay Bill Is Nothing Short Of Medieval Barbarity
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/26/this...
In November 2011 St Petersburg shocked the world. The legislative assembly approved, in its first reading, a bill which outlawed the promotion of homosexuality, transsexuality and paedophilia to minors. The passage of the bill provoked a quick reaction from local LGBT activists, who organised several protests against the initiative. It also mobilised the international community. The bill was condemned by MEPs, the US state department and thousands of people from around the world, who signed an online petition against its implementation.
St Petersburg, which is deemed the cultural capital of Russia, the place where many famous gay people created our artistic heritage, entered into the 21st century's hall of shame by drifting into medieval barbarity.
I assume you are Russian. My ex-partner (still my housemate) is from St. Petersburg. He has a sister there but does not want to go back from what he hears. Your country has sunk into a much worse state than under the communists. Every day the Russian news media presents stories about cannibalism, baby killing, people intentionally running over other people, etc. You all go around beating up and killing the "chernozhoppy." Your society has become completely decadent (in the old sense of the word - English speakers please note it does not mean luxurious or indulgent). Additionally, the revitalization of the evil Orthodox church has not helped. What kind of fucked up organization can make a saint out of a man like the last tsar, an autocratic bastard who promulgated pogroms and killing of peasants? Your economy may be growing and you may be gradually licking your population decline problem, but morally, your country is bankrupt. It is not merely Putin and the leaders, but the everyday people as well.

“Reality is better than truth.”

Since: Nov 09

Indianapolis

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#10
Nov 27, 2011
 

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Nobody said we can stop russia from making such a law--unless it violates accords they signed with the UN, at least, and then it is the UN's move, no ours. But we most certainly CAN comment on it and even act in terms of our political and trade relationships with them.

We have condemned sharia law in terms of human rights abuses, but their beheadings are no different than our lethal injections. Killing lawbreakers is killing lawbreakers.
ronan wrote:
I fail to see how a law passed in Russia could be of any interest in America. It's all about sovereignty.
Russia is a sovereign country and is allowed to make legislation without any comment from abroad.
I hope the US State Department could also comment on internal laws in Saudi Arabia... Or maybe they consider Sharia Law acceptable, with public beheading?
ronan

UK

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#11
Nov 27, 2011
 

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cpeter1313 wrote:
We have condemned sharia law in terms of human rights abuses, but their beheadings are no different than our lethal injections. Killing lawbreakers is killing lawbreakers.
<quoted text>
Absolutely.
The USA are not in a strong position when it comes to criticise human rights in other countries.

Rendition programme, kidnapping, torture, illegal detention, Guantanamo Bay, death penalty, do I need to go on?

Since: Sep 08

Placitas, NM

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#12
Nov 27, 2011
 

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ronan wrote:
I fail to see how a law passed in Russia could be of any interest in America. It's all about sovereignty.
Russia is a sovereign country and is allowed to make legislation without any comment from abroad.
I hope the US State Department could also comment on internal laws in Saudi Arabia... Or maybe they consider Sharia Law acceptable, with public beheading?
I am sure you made that "sovereign country" argument when Dubya was LYING the US into an illegal and immoral war against a sovereign country.

Only an ignoramus would not know that the US State has spoken out on the human rights violations that are prevalent in Saudi Arabia.

Would you have 'fail to see how a law passed in Russia could be of any interest in America' when, from 1933 - 39 the Nazis were implementing more than 400 laws, decrees and regulations that restricted all aspects of Jewish life?

BTW: Isn't the State Dept speaking out about the 'internal laws in Saudi Arabia' not interfering on a "sovereign country's" policies?

“Reality is better than truth.”

Since: Nov 09

Indianapolis

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#13
Nov 27, 2011
 

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There is a difference between military treatment of non-citizens and the treatment of one's own people. I don't approve of many of the things you bring up concerning our treatment of prisoners from iraq, but that isn't the issue here.
ronan wrote:
<quoted text>
Absolutely.
The USA are not in a strong position when it comes to criticise human rights in other countries.
Rendition programme, kidnapping, torture, illegal detention, Guantanamo Bay, death penalty, do I need to go on?

“Reality is better than truth.”

Since: Nov 09

Indianapolis

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#14
Nov 27, 2011
 

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For the sake of clarity, I approve of the death penalty in many cases, if the crime is heinous and the proof incontrovertible.

“Together for 24, legal for 5”

Since: Sep 07

Littleton, NH

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#16
Nov 27, 2011
 

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ronan wrote:
I fail to see how a law passed in Russia could be of any interest in America. It's all about sovereignty.
Russia is a sovereign country and is allowed to make legislation without any comment from abroad.
I hope the US State Department could also comment on internal laws in Saudi Arabia... Or maybe they consider Sharia Law acceptable, with public beheading?
Well, that shows what you don't know about international diplomacy. Countries often comment on rights issues in other countries, particularly when the country feels an affinity for the people whose rights have been violated. Hence, the United States and European countries often comment on religious and racial intolerance around the world. Countries invariably comment when expatriate communities are discriminated against. Think, in particular, about western intervention on behalf of Jews in Eastern Europe and of Christians in the Middle East. Western countries, in particular, have much to say about racial issues, as well. Think, for instance, of Apartheid in South Africa.

“Together for 24, legal for 5”

Since: Sep 07

Littleton, NH

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#17
Nov 27, 2011
 

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cpeter1313 wrote:
We have condemned sharia law in terms of human rights abuses, but their beheadings are no different than our lethal injections. Killing lawbreakers is killing lawbreakers.
<quoted text>
Despite the typical squeamishness about actual blood, a well-executed beheading may, indeed, be no more cruel than lethal injection. On the other hand, sharia law also prescribes stoning to death and other completely barbaric practices. It also prescribes harsh and inhumane punishments for what we consider minor infractions--or even for exercising control over your own body. You cannot compare western jurisprudence with sharia law.

“Son of Abraham”

Since: Aug 07

Natural Deviant

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#18
Nov 27, 2011
 

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America is one hypocritical joke...
ronan

UK

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#19
Nov 27, 2011
 
PlacitasRoy wrote:
<quoted text>

Only an ignoramus would not know that the US State has spoken out on the human rights violations that are prevalent in Saudi Arabia.
The USA is not qualified to comment on violation of human rights by ANY other country; it is the main violator of human rights!

People who live in a glass house shouldn't throw stones!

I know what I would say to the State Department if I was a Saudi official!!

Get the fuck out of my countyry!!!
Newt s First Two Wives

Philadelphia, PA

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#20
Nov 27, 2011
 

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ronan wrote:
I fail to see how a law passed in Russia could be of any interest in America....
The glbt rights movement is international now. Like the women's movement.

Would you say the same if the US enacted pogroms against Americans of Russian descent?
ronan

UK

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#21
Nov 27, 2011
 
Newt s First Two Wives wrote:
<quoted text>
The glbt rights movement is international now. Like the women's movement.
Would you say the same if the US enacted pogroms against Americans of Russian descent?
There is a huge difference between passing a law and engineering pogroms.

If a country pass a law to exclude some elements of its population that's one thing; but encouraging a lynch mob to enact violence against a minority is different.

A law is supposed to be based on the wishes of the majority; I have never heard that pogroms needed much more than a xenophobe minority.

But why don't the US push the glbt agenda first on countries they call allies first, like Pakistan, Saudi Arabia. Why choose Russia?

I have nothing against glbt myself (or the women's movement), and the UK thankfully respect their rights. At the same time, I cannot see how we can realistically expect to impose the same values in countries that have a completely different culture. Just like we find some of their customs abhorent, they resent some of ours.

After all, until quite recently, the US military used to sack gay servicemen it could find in its ranks. So I don't think they are really at the forefront against homophobia, do I? You get me?

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