La Cage Aux Folles

Sep 13, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: EDGE

Most Criterion releases are all about the auteur. They place the works of great filmmakers into detailed contexts and allow them the high-level presentations they would languish without otherwise.

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“Common courtesy, isn't”

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#1
Sep 13, 2013
 

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Despite the author's initial statement, "most" Criterion releases are not "all about the auteur." They are about the individual films themselves. Thus, "The Times of Harvey Milk" and "Weekend" (for example) are included in the Collection not because Rob Epstein and Andrew Haigh are considered auteurs, or because these films are "landmarks of queer cinema"; instead, they are landmarks of the cinema, period. The same goes for any number of other films given the Criterion treatment, from Charles Laughton's "The Night of the Hunter" (the only film he directed) to Roy Ward Baker's "A Night to Remember", etc. etc.

I am certain "La Cage Aux Folles" is being given the deluxe Criterion treatment because it was, for many years, the highest-grossing foreign language film that ever played in America. It was a huge popular hit among moviegoers of all sexual orientations. It's boxoffice success was one of the main reasons that Mike Nichols remade the film in English as "The Birdcage".

The writer of the article might have been of more help to readers if he had pointed out that Criterion titles typically go on sale for 50% off twice a year at Barnes and Nobles, at Best Buy, and at Amazon. Thus, readers who are unable or unwilling to pay the steep $39.99 price tag may pick it up $19.99 if they're willing to wait a few months for the next sales cycle to hit (which should be in January or February of 2014).

“... from a ...”

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#2
Sep 13, 2013
 
I agree.

A horrible piece of writing!

“Equality First”

Since: Jan 09

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#3
Sep 14, 2013
 
Otter in the Ozarks wrote:
The writer of the article might have been of more help to readers if he had pointed out that Criterion titles typically go on sale for 50% off twice a year at Barnes and Nobles, at Best Buy, and at Amazon. Thus, readers who are unable or unwilling to pay the steep $39.99 price tag may pick it up $19.99 if they're willing to wait a few months for the next sales cycle to hit (which should be in January or February of 2014).
For me there is no movie I can't wait to see on ATT Uverse or Netflix.

“... from a ...”

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#4
Sep 14, 2013
 
Otter in the Ozarks wrote:
... The writer of the article might have been of more help to readers if he had pointed out that Criterion titles typically go on sale for 50% off twice a year at Barnes and Nobles, at Best Buy, and at Amazon. Thus, readers who are unable or unwilling to pay the steep $39.99 price tag may pick it up $19.99 if they're willing to wait a few months for the next sales cycle to hit (which should be in January or February of 2014).
Better yet, keep your money closer to home by finding such things at your local used book/record/CD/DVD (with instore sit-n-read) coffeehouse. If your community doesn't have one, open one. The best location for such a place is as part of what is called the "rainmaker triangle": movie theatre + pizza parlor + bookstore coffeehouse all within steps of each other. If it has cybercafe elements, you'll rake it in. No pizza parlor nearby? Open one of those, too. Different skillset, so a collaborative effort with a loose partner(s) is best. The model chains really well, too, once you've worked out the kinks on your prototypes.

“Common courtesy, isn't”

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#5
Sep 14, 2013
 
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
Better yet, keep your money closer to home by finding such things at your local used book/record/CD/DVD (with instore sit-n-read) coffeehouse. If your community doesn't have one, open one. The best location for such a place is as part of what is called the "rainmaker triangle": movie theatre + pizza parlor + bookstore coffeehouse all within steps of each other. If it has cybercafe elements, you'll rake it in. No pizza parlor nearby? Open one of those, too. Different skillset, so a collaborative effort with a loose partner(s) is best. The model chains really well, too, once you've worked out the kinks on your prototypes.
A great idea ... except that in my town of 790 people (and yes, we're the county seat), there's not much of a demand for a used media store / coffeehouse, and no movie theatre or pizza parlor to locate one near. Heck, the only place to rent DVDs is a little counter rack down at the convenience store, with about 100 titles available (most of them John Wayne movies or action flicks).

Lest you get the wrong idea, we do have an incredible gourmet restaurant run by a cordon bleu chef that attracts people within a two hour radius, but that's the exception rather than the rule.

Nope, around these parts, Amazon is our best friend ... and those occasional runs into the larger cities in outlying counties!

“... from a ...”

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#6
Sep 15, 2013
 
Otter in the Ozarks wrote:
<quoted text>
A great idea ... except that in my town of 790 people (and yes, we're the county seat), there's not much of a demand for a used media store / coffeehouse, and no movie theatre or pizza parlor to locate one near. Heck, the only place to rent DVDs is a little counter rack down at the convenience store, with about 100 titles available (most of them John Wayne movies or action flicks).
Lest you get the wrong idea, we do have an incredible gourmet restaurant run by a cordon bleu chef that attracts people within a two hour radius, but that's the exception rather than the rule.
Nope, around these parts, Amazon is our best friend ... and those occasional runs into the larger cities in outlying counties!
Then you need to open 3 such triangles simultaneously, the idea being that the other used-item shops help to stock that small one. Buying books/records/CD-DVD's at estate auctions in addition to over the counter purchases really ups the inventory flow, and allows for some very remarkable finds. In a community that small, your triangle can become the social hub, especially for young people. The overhead is amortized across the other stores. You can really up the cultural/intellectual quiotient of your town! What a happy social service THAT would be, eh?

One such business that I (semi)silent partnered, just a used bookstore next to a movie theatre but near good restaurants of various prices, was sistered with stores up on the Russian River and Napa, then later Chico and Roseville. The cross flow of titles, and the quantity was stunning. They ran for 35 years until we decided to split the stores among the kids of the partners. All but one are still running and have modernized considerably.

In a town like yours, I can see it becoming one of the places that the local kids come to hang for a few hours a week ... if you can set the tone right and not watch the comfy reading corners in the back too closely. lol.

One of the stores still running back home got the contract from the local college and university to be the sale point for all the non-textbook supplementary reading materials, and have partnered with one of the local printshops to be the on-demand outlet. The added copyshop corner and pizza slice business, keep the place booming from 9 in the morning until after theater midnight crowd with widely different kinds of clientele at various hours. The transformation of half the side parking lot into a garden patio with little lights in all the trees and a fire pit made the evenings one of the places for an inexpensive rendezvous for the young-on-a-budget on warm evenings. Romantic lighting and looking smart to your girlfriend (it IS a bookstore, after all) all for the price of a cappucino and a baked noshie, or a coke-n-a-slice, sure go a long way for a teen on a budget.

Authors and acoustic performers who sign on to do all of the locations are regularly featured, and there's talk of an annual music series.

Such places can transform a small community and liven up the businesses in the area but, as I said, the really small communities are supported by the larger ones.

All told, there are 11 locations that are part of the cooperative.

It works.

“Equality First”

Since: Jan 09

St. Louis, MO

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#7
Sep 16, 2013
 

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Otter in the Ozarks wrote:
<quoted text>
A great idea ... except that in my town of 790 people (and yes, we're the county seat), there's not much of a demand for a used media store / coffeehouse, and no movie theatre or pizza parlor to locate one near. Heck, the only place to rent DVDs is a little counter rack down at the convenience store, with about 100 titles available (most of them John Wayne movies or action flicks).
Lest you get the wrong idea, we do have an incredible gourmet restaurant run by a cordon bleu chef that attracts people within a two hour radius, but that's the exception rather than the rule.
Nope, around these parts, Amazon is our best friend ... and those occasional runs into the larger cities in outlying counties!
I don't know if you have noticed or not, but a group of friends and I have been traveling around the state and finding some excellent restaurants in the most unlikely places. Some of our very small towns, evidently like yours, somehow support some really fine eateries. I don't understand it, but it seems to work.

“Common courtesy, isn't”

Since: Nov 07

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#8
Sep 16, 2013
 
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
Then you need to open 3 such triangles simultaneously, the idea being that the other used-item shops help to stock that small one. Buying books/records/CD-DVD's at estate auctions in addition to over the counter purchases really ups the inventory flow, and allows for some very remarkable finds. In a community that small, your triangle can become the social hub, especially for young people. The overhead is amortized across the other stores. You can really up the cultural/intellectual quiotient of your town! What a happy social service THAT would be, eh?
One such business that I (semi)silent partnered, just a used bookstore next to a movie theatre but near good restaurants of various prices, was sistered with stores up on the Russian River and Napa, then later Chico and Roseville. The cross flow of titles, and the quantity was stunning. They ran for 35 years until we decided to split the stores among the kids of the partners. All but one are still running and have modernized considerably.
In a town like yours, I can see it becoming one of the places that the local kids come to hang for a few hours a week ... if you can set the tone right and not watch the comfy reading corners in the back too closely. lol.
One of the stores still running back home got the contract from the local college and university to be the sale point for all the non-textbook supplementary reading materials, and have partnered with one of the local printshops to be the on-demand outlet. The added copyshop corner and pizza slice business, keep the place booming from 9 in the morning until after theater midnight crowd with widely different kinds of clientele at various hours. The transformation of half the side parking lot into a garden patio with little lights in all the trees and a fire pit made the evenings one of the places for an inexpensive rendezvous for the young-on-a-budget on warm evenings. Romantic lighting and looking smart to your girlfriend (it IS a bookstore, after all) all for the price of a cappucino and a baked noshie, or a coke-n-a-slice, sure go a long way for a teen on a budget.
Authors and acoustic performers who sign on to do all of the locations are regularly featured, and there's talk of an annual music series.
Such places can transform a small community and liven up the businesses in the area but, as I said, the really small communities are supported by the larger ones.
All told, there are 11 locations that are part of the cooperative.
It works.
I'll let you provide the start-up funds and take the financial risk! <grin> Exactly how many "young people" do you think there are in a town with a population of 790? I think it's pretty significant that one small high school serves the entire county, which covers 540 square miles and has a total population of 23,000. This is a beautiful spot where people come to retire ... or to disappear ... not to raise families or to look for work.

“Common courtesy, isn't”

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#9
Sep 16, 2013
 
RalphB wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't know if you have noticed or not, but a group of friends and I have been traveling around the state and finding some excellent restaurants in the most unlikely places. Some of our very small towns, evidently like yours, somehow support some really fine eateries. I don't understand it, but it seems to work.
You must let me know when you head down to the southwest corner of the state. The restaurant is located on the river near an old dam where the grist mill used to be, and the menu is incredible. Try the fried green beans as an appetizer, pick either the cedar-wrapped salmon or the pork tenderloin with the blackberry-cardamom glace as your entree, and make sure to save room for the creme brulee for dessert. Every one of my friends who have visited from the Dallas-Fort Worth area have said it was worth the 7 hour drive just to eat there.

“Equality First”

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#10
Sep 17, 2013
 
Otter in the Ozarks wrote:
<quoted text>
You must let me know when you head down to the southwest corner of the state. The restaurant is located on the river near an old dam where the grist mill used to be, and the menu is incredible. Try the fried green beans as an appetizer, pick either the cedar-wrapped salmon or the pork tenderloin with the blackberry-cardamom glace as your entree, and make sure to save room for the creme brulee for dessert. Every one of my friends who have visited from the Dallas-Fort Worth area have said it was worth the 7 hour drive just to eat there.
Let me know the name of the restaurant or the town. You can send it to me thru the messages on my Topix profile. I'm going to K.C. quite often. How far out of the way?

“... from a ...”

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#11
Sep 17, 2013
 
Otter in the Ozarks wrote:
<quoted text>
I'll let you provide the start-up funds and take the financial risk! <grin> Exactly how many "young people" do you think there are in a town with a population of 790? I think it's pretty significant that one small high school serves the entire county, which covers 540 square miles and has a total population of 23,000. This is a beautiful spot where people come to retire ... or to disappear ... not to raise families or to look for work.
They travel everywhere to get anywhere. It's like urban sprawl with lots of trees.

The locations in the bigger cities amortize the costs of places like yours. It's part of the business plan. Grooming the next generation.

I'm in Ireland now in (semi) retirement, but I'll tell some others to give that neck of the woods a looksee.

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