Gays And Blacks Team Up.

Posted in the Gay/Lesbian Forum

Jumper

Owensboro, KY

#1 Jan 2, 2013
GP-'Dinners R' Us' a program where Homosexuals are delevering hot meals to inner city blacks has become a big success in some of the most dangerous sections of low-income comunities.
"I think as long as we try be more kind to African Americans,we can both benifit eachother in many different ways when it comes to bigotry." Fred Willson said as he unloaded several plastic trays of fried chicken at a local black youth center.

The Dinners R'us Idea was the brain child of the late Sammy Carrlton.After being attacked by several black members of the natorios Black Stalker street gang,he returned to the area several months later with a U-haul truck full of hot food donated by city restrants.
"His dream was to find those who attacked him and show them the kindness of forgiveness. Fred said.He will be missed."

Even though the first attempt of this plan was unsuccessful,it soon caught on with the local black comunity.

Since: Jun 11

AOL

#2 Jan 2, 2013
Coretta Scott King:
"I still hear people say that I should not be talking about the rights of lesbian and gay people and I should stick to the issue of racial justice... But I hasten to remind them that Martin Luther King, Jr., said,'Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere'... I appeal to everyone who believes in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s dream to make room at the table of brotherhood and sisterhood for lesbian and gay people."

"We are all tied together in a single garment of destiny... I can never be what I ought to be until you are allowed to be what you ought to be," she said, quoting from her husband. "I've always felt that homophobic attitudes and policies were unjust and unworthy of a free society and must be opposed by all Americans who believe in democracy."3
"Gays and lesbians stood up for civil rights in Montgomery, Selma, in Albany, Georgia, and St. Augustine, Florida, and many other campaigns of the Civil Rights Movement. Many of these courageous men and women were fighting for my freedom at a time when they could find few voices for their own, and I salute their contributions."

"We have to launch a campaign against homophobia in the black community."

"Homophobia is like racism and anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry in that it seeks to dehumanize a large group of people, to deny their humanity, their dignity and personhood. This sets the stage for further repression and violence that spread all too easily to victimize the next minority group."

Since: Jun 11

AOL

#3 Jan 2, 2013
Rev. Dr. James Lawson is a distinguished United Methodist pastor who worked side-by-side with Dr. King training the activists who participated in the lunch counter sit-ins and the Freedom Rides of the 1960s. In 2004, he received the Community of Christ International Peace Award. Rev. Lawson said of the plight of many gay people: "Gays and lesbians have a more difficult time than we did. We had our families and our churches on our side. All too often, they have neither."

Mildred Loving: "I am proud that Richard's and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about."

Rev. Peter Gomes, Harvard University Chaplain: "If society waited for majority opinion and legislative action, African-Americans, for example, would still be enduring the indignities of separate but equal accommodation and the other manifestations of legal, social, and political segregation. If the decision of the Supreme Judicial Court in Goodridge is "judicial tyranny," let there be more of it...
To extend the civil right of marriage to homosexuals will neither solve nor complicate the problems already inherent in marriage, but what it will do is permit a whole class of persons, our fellow citizens under the law heretofore irrationally deprived of a civil right, both to benefit from and participate in a valuable yet vulnerable institution which in our changing society needs all the help it can get." (Boston Globe, 2/8/04)

It is time to overcome prejudice and treat others the way you want to be treated.
Jumper

Owensboro, KY

#5 Jan 2, 2013
Ah yea...you took the words right out of my mouth!

Since: Jun 11

AOL

#6 Jan 2, 2013
It was civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, architect of the March On Washington and one of Dr. King's main advisors who in 1986 said: "The barometer of where one is on human rights questions is no longer the black community, it's the gay community, because it is the community which is most easily mistreated."

Since: Jun 11

AOL

#7 Jan 2, 2013
Rev. William Sinkford, former President, Unitarian Universalist Church: "The Unitarian Universalist Association has a long-standing and deeply held religious commitment to support full equality for gay people. We dedicate ourselves to work for justice, grounded in faith, which calls us to support everyone's full humanity, everyone's ability to love, and everyone's value in the world.

Julian Bond said in 2005:“Many gays, many lesbians, worked side by side with me in the civil rights movement. Am I supposed to tell them now thanks for risking their lives and their limbs to help me win my rights but that they are excluded because of the circumstances of their birth? Not a chance.”
He also said; " I think Martin King would stand as his widow stood -- in favor of them."

Julian Bond again: "I see this as a civil rights issue. That means I support gay civil marriage."

“It is time to say forthrightly that the government’s exclusion of our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters from civil marriage officially degrades them and their families.”— Rep. John Lewis (D-GA)

Andrew Young said about marriage equality: "I think it would be consistent with our historic spirit of fairness and justice. But it also would be consistent with the spirit of grace and mercy as the path to peace that you judge not that you not be judged."

Since: Jun 11

AOL

#9 Jan 2, 2013
By James A. Lopata :

"In the book Lost Prophet: The Life and Times of Bayard Rustin, historian John D'Emilio portrays King — even in defiance of his other advisors — as one who always backed the out homosexual Rustin.
In one poignant example of King's support, D'Emilio describes a critical moment in the planning for what would become known as the Great March on Washington of 1963 where King would deliver his immortal "I Have a Dream" speech.

The planners had just decided as a group that despite Bayard Rustin's superior activist and organizational abilities, they would not make him director of the March.

Instead, they asked A. Phillip Randolph, a man renowned for his labor activism on behalf of African-Americans — in fact, a seated statue of him in the waiting area to the Back Bay commuter and railway station in Boston commemorates his efforts as the first president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters.

Randolph immediately said he would decline the director position unless he would be allowed to appoint his deputy, and that that deputy would be Bayard Rustin.

Rustin was a risky choice, and not just because King's advisors were uncomfortable with his homosexuality. Rustin had been convicted in 1953 of "sex perversion," which, at the time, was criminal activity known as consensual sodomy.

U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond from South Carolina, a powerful voice opposing African-American social justice work, made good fodder of Rustin’s conviction, attempting to discredit the entire Civil Rights movement on the floor of the U.S. Senate by tying it to the work of a “sexual pervert,” i.e. Rustin.

With so much at stake, it would have been easy for Randolph, King, and the other planners to simply dismiss the “sexual pervert” Rustin from any active participation.

Randolph, fully understanding the hazards, turned to Martin Luther King, Jr., and asked directly if King supported Rustin as deputy director of the important March. King said:

"I vote yes."

With those three words, even the most reluctant of the group acquiesced.

Gay people like me may not be blood relatives of Martin Luther King, Jr., but many of us count ourselves as sons and daughters in his family of justice.

Clearly, I side with Coretta Scott King in her assessment of King's support of LGBT rights. I know in my sanctified heart that King put his life at stake for social injustice everywhere.

I believe that if King were asked today if he supported gender identity expression rights, civil marriage for same-sex couples, and sexual orientation non-discrimination legislation, he would say:

"I vote yes."

http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/blogs/bostons...

Since: Jun 11

AOL

#10 Jan 2, 2013
In 2009, Julian Bond wrote, "Black people, of all people, should not oppose equality. And that is what gay marriage represents.... No people of good will should oppose marriage equality. And they should not think that civil unions are a substitute. At best, civil unions are separate but equal. And we all know separate is never equal."

John Lewis, testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the Defense of Marriage Act, remarked, "I am very happy to see the Judiciary Committee holding hearings to address the issue of marriage equality. But at the same time, I must admit I find it unbelievable that in the year 2011 there is still a need to hold hearings and debate whether or not a human being should be able to marry the one they love."

Standing at a podium in front of the State Legislative Building for HKonJ last month, the Rev. Dr. William Barber II, North Carolina NAACP chairman, declared, "They're trying to give people, based on their sexuality, a kind of second- or third-class citizenship. We know what that looks like in the NAACP, and we're calling it what it is."

The Rev. Al Sharpton, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, South African President Nelson Mandela, the Rev. Dr. James Lawson, National NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous - a veritable Who's Who of civil rights - all support marriage equality.

Julian Bond, who testified, "When I'm asked if gay rights are civil rights, my answer is always:'Of course they are.' Civil rights are positive legal prerogatives, the right to equal treatment before the law.... There's no one in the United States who does not, or should not, share in enjoying these rights."

http://www.thepilot.com/news/2012/mar/18/yes-...

Since: Jun 11

AOL

#11 Jan 2, 2013
Jul 5 2005 "One prominent supporter of the resolution was Reverend Andrew Young, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and mayor of Atlanta, and a lifelong member of the UCC. Just days before the vote was scheduled to take place, Young issued a statement saying he hoped the General Synod would approve the resolution affirming same-sex marriage equality.

"I'd be disappointed if we did not approve this resolution," he said on Friday. "I think it would be consistent with our historic spirit of fairness and justice, but it also would be consistent with the spirit of grace and mercy as the path to peace and that you judge not that you not be judged."

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1505195/main...

Since: Jun 11

AOL

#12 Jan 2, 2013
Rev.Jesse Jackson:“We stand together today to uphold the principles of due process, of equal protection under the law, of fighting against discrimination against any and all people based on race, religion, gender or sexual orientation.
“We stand with you today to support marriage equality, and to declare that Proposition 8 must be struck down as unconstitutional.

“Peoples’ right to self-expression, self-determination be respected and affirmed. It’s time to challenge ignorance, a time to break the silence and the chains of hatred, of divisive and discriminatory bigotry.

“Marriage is based on love – not on sexual orientation. I support the right for any person to marry the person of their choosing.

“If Dr King and our civil rights movement has taught us anything, it’s the fundamental principle of that all people deserve equal protection under the law." http://www.pinknews.co.uk/2010/12/08/jesse-ja...
Jumper

Owensboro, KY

#13 Jan 2, 2013
Not Yet Equal wrote:
Rev.Jesse Jackson:“We stand together today to uphold the principles of due process, of equal protection under the law, of fighting against discrimination against any and all people based on race, religion, gender or sexual orientation.
“We stand with you today to support marriage equality, and to declare that Proposition 8 must be struck down as unconstitutional.
“Peoples’ right to self-expression, self-determination be respected and affirmed. It’s time to challenge ignorance, a time to break the silence and the chains of hatred, of divisive and discriminatory bigotry.
“Marriage is based on love – not on sexual orientation. I support the right for any person to marry the person of their choosing.
“If Dr King and our civil rights movement has taught us anything, it’s the fundamental principle of that all people deserve equal protection under the law." http://www.pinknews.co.uk/2010/12/08/jesse-ja...
Well I'm glad YOU found a hobby.

Since: Jun 11

AOL

#15 Jan 2, 2013
Wade Henderson, president and CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights: "And yet while their story of oppression and injustice is not the same as ours, it is equally valid. African-Americans recognize injustice when we see it. Gays and lesbians have been incarcerated, brutalized, lobotomized, raped, castrated, and robbed of their jobs, families and children."

Many religious leaders, scholars, organizations, and believers support marriage equality:

Rev. Dr. William Barber II, North Carolina NAACP chairman, declared, "They're trying to give people, based on their sexuality, a kind of second- or third-class citizenship. We know what that looks like in the NAACP, and we're calling it what it is."

The Rev. Jesse Jackson, speaking in opposition to California's Proposition 8, said, "To those that believe in and fought for civil rights, that marched to end discrimination and win equality, you must not become that which you hated.... Those that support civil and human rights cannot, must not, become perpetrators of discrimination against others based upon race, religion, culture, sexual orientation."
SLIF

Scarborough, Canada

#16 Jan 3, 2013
Try Ravioli and couponing.
Felix

Tulsa, OK

#17 Jan 3, 2013
Jumper wrote:
<quoted text>Well I'm glad YOU found a hobby.
His hobby is spamming the boards with prohomo-propaganda.
Jumper

Owensboro, KY

#18 Jan 3, 2013
I do wonder at the possibility of 'morpodites'? that are gay.

How do you classify them?

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