Newborn's Birth Certificate Will List Gay Man and Lesbian Mothers as Parents

Feb 7, 2013 Full story: EDGE 44

After a two-year court battle, a Florida circuit judge in Miami-Dade County approved a private adoption and will allow a gay man and a married lesbian couple to be listed on the baby girl's birth certificate, the Miami Herald reports.

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“Equality First”

Since: Jan 09

St. Louis, MO

#27 Feb 9, 2013
Gay And Proud wrote:
<quoted text>
The state (at least in Minnesota where we adopted) still has the biological parents listed in the records -- the old birth certificates aren't destroyed.
"Closed" adoptions where the adopted child is denied a record of their birth parents is actually quite rare these days. Most adoptions are now "open" adoptions, often with the birth family being kept informed and connected to their biological children even though they are now legally no longer parents of that child.
In my family's case, our kids stay in touch with their biological family (aunts, uncles, cousins, etc.) Their family just expanded through the adoption.
It is easier nowadays, but not so long ago it almost took an act of Congress to get birth info on adoptees. I know, as it took me almost two years to get my father's(an adopted child) original birth certificate. In fact, I had to enlist the aid of a member of the State Senate to assist me. Members of our genealogical society have told me similar stories.

“Luke laughs at hypocrites!”

Since: Sep 10

Palm Springs, California

#28 Feb 9, 2013
Lady Evil wrote:
No you're not. Like I give a chit anyway.
I don't lie, he bitch, unlike you, who has all the time in the world to keep logging in under new names.

I used to be 6'7" but time has taken its toll and I've settled a bit in my dotage.

“Reality is better than truth.”

Since: Nov 09

Indianapolis

#29 Feb 9, 2013
That's because, at one time, adoption was considered a clean break. Now it sems that bio parents don't have any right to privacy. No wonder abortion is a more attractive option.
RalphB wrote:
<quoted text>
It is easier nowadays, but not so long ago it almost took an act of Congress to get birth info on adoptees. I know, as it took me almost two years to get my father's(an adopted child) original birth certificate. In fact, I had to enlist the aid of a member of the State Senate to assist me. Members of our genealogical society have told me similar stories.

Since: Apr 08

Chagrin Falls, OH

#30 Feb 9, 2013
cpeter1313 wrote:
That's because, at one time, adoption was considered a clean break. Now it sems that bio parents don't have any right to privacy. No wonder abortion is a more attractive option.
<quoted text>
Whether an adoption is open or closed is a choice that the biological parents make.

“Reality is better than truth.”

Since: Nov 09

Indianapolis

#33 Feb 9, 2013
With which I agree. But it seems that, if the kid wants to know his bio parents, those parents' right to privacy go out the window.
Gay And Proud wrote:
<quoted text>
Whether an adoption is open or closed is a choice that the biological parents make.

Uve

Since: Nov 12

Location hidden

#35 Feb 9, 2013
Curteese wrote:
<quoted text>I don't care how many false names you make up, REGIS, MAX, CALEB, RAND, THRUTHTELLER, DAVID MOORE, BURNO. A liar is still a liar and obviously one with anger issues, threatening me? You could be arrested for that, DAVID MOORE.
Threatening physical assault is a Class C misdemeanor in Illinois and can be 30 days in jail and $1500 fine. Combining it with hate speech bumps it up to a felony. Care to make it even MORE heinous for you? Add actual physical attack, which you seem to be PANTING to do, and you are looking at SERIOUS trouble there, DAVID MOORE.
Go Curteese! I'm sick of the POS too!

“Equality First”

Since: Jan 09

St. Louis, MO

#36 Feb 10, 2013
cpeter1313 wrote:
With which I agree. But it seems that, if the kid wants to know his bio parents, those parents' right to privacy go out the window.
<quoted text>
At the very least, if the birth parents want it kept secret, the full family medical info should be available to the child, or the child's new parents. Aside from just the fact that I was doing genealogy, I also wanted full medical info. My father's side of the family has an hereditary susceptibility to a particular condition, and I could have taken precautions had I known about it. Sadly, it was not known to my father earlier, when it could have done some good.

“Reality is better than truth.”

Since: Nov 09

Indianapolis

#37 Feb 10, 2013
But if your father didn't know about it, what good would the non-info have done? My father's side has a history of a particular form of arthritis, but it wasn't discovered in context until my generation. Nor would there be any way to prevent it.

I'm not against a medical history bring available, but the bio parents have a right to privacy.
RalphB wrote:
<quoted text>
At the very least, if the birth parents want it kept secret, the full family medical info should be available to the child, or the child's new parents. Aside from just the fact that I was doing genealogy, I also wanted full medical info. My father's side of the family has an hereditary susceptibility to a particular condition, and I could have taken precautions had I known about it. Sadly, it was not known to my father earlier, when it could have done some good.

Since: Apr 08

Chagrin Falls, OH

#38 Feb 10, 2013
cpeter1313 wrote:
But if your father didn't know about it, what good would the non-info have done? My father's side has a history of a particular form of arthritis, but it wasn't discovered in context until my generation. Nor would there be any way to prevent it.
I'm not against a medical history bring available, but the bio parents have a right to privacy.
<quoted text>
Good adoption agencies (at least in the USA) work closely with the birth parents as well as the adoptive families to try and ensure all these concerns are met. It's not like the old days where birth parents really were being forced to lose all connection with their children, and adopted kids were being routinely denied info on their bio families. Today, each case is treated individually with a lot of birth parents choosing to have at least some continuing connection with their child.

Since: Apr 08

Chagrin Falls, OH

#39 Feb 10, 2013
Oh, and in the case where adoptive parents are adopting a newborn in the United States, it's quite common that the birth parents choose which adoptive parents their child will go to.

“and how does this effect you?”

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#40 Feb 10, 2013
Rick in Kansas wrote:
<quoted text>In this case, they do have an accurate record, as both biological parents are named on the birth certificate, the state is merely adding the second mother's name. In cases where the birth certificate issued doesn't have the name of the actual biological parents, those names, if known, are available from the state.
Fitz wrote, "I did not know that birth certificates were about the feelings of the parents or designed o help people play make believe."

Birth certificates are essentially deeds issued for live births and it goes in the names of the folks taking the baby home with them, biological parent or parents or not. In the case of marriage, any child born into it, even through the use of surrogates, is considered a product of that marriage, biologically possible or not.
Fitz wrote, "I thought they were about acuratley recording the birth of children."

The state accurately records the birth with the names of the actual biological parents, if given, but then they issue the birth certificate in the names of the "parents" taking that baby with them.
So this child has three parents? Three people who will have a hand in how this child is raised? We should all be so lucky!

“ reality, what a concept”

Since: Nov 07

this one

#41 Feb 10, 2013
Kimberling wrote:
So this child has three parents? Three people who will have a hand in how this child is raised? We should all be so lucky!
Sadly, not everyone sees it that way.

Since: Apr 08

Chagrin Falls, OH

#42 Feb 11, 2013
Rick in Kansas wrote:
<quoted text>Sadly, not everyone sees it that way.
There are still some troglodytes who complain if the parents aren't the "right" skin colour or the "right" religion.

“ reality, what a concept”

Since: Nov 07

this one

#43 Feb 11, 2013
Gay And Proud wrote:
There are still some troglodytes who complain if the parents aren't the "right" skin colour or the "right" religion.
There will always probably be those who have the need to feel superior by natural right.

“Equality First”

Since: Jan 09

St. Louis, MO

#44 Feb 11, 2013
cpeter1313 wrote:
But if your father didn't know about it, what good would the non-info have done? My father's side has a history of a particular form of arthritis, but it wasn't discovered in context until my generation. Nor would there be any way to prevent it.
I'm not against a medical history bring available, but the bio parents have a right to privacy.
<quoted text>
That is just the point. Had they made provisions, my father would have known. Yes, the parents have a right to privacy, but my father should have had the right to know his family medical history, and possibly have prevented an early death.

Since: Apr 08

Chagrin Falls, OH

#45 Feb 11, 2013
RalphB wrote:
<quoted text>
That is just the point. Had they made provisions, my father would have known. Yes, the parents have a right to privacy, but my father should have had the right to know his family medical history, and possibly have prevented an early death.
Actually, these days if you want to know your genetic predisposition for various health issues the best way to get that info is to use a genetic testing service like 23andme.com . Even having access to your biological family's history doesn't always help with medical history info.

“Equality First”

Since: Jan 09

St. Louis, MO

#46 Feb 11, 2013
Gay And Proud wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, these days if you want to know your genetic predisposition for various health issues the best way to get that info is to use a genetic testing service like 23andme.com . Even having access to your biological family's history doesn't always help with medical history info.
That is true also. However, this was not the case a quarter century ago when we needed the medical info, but couldn't get it.

“Equality First”

Since: Jan 09

St. Louis, MO

#47 Feb 11, 2013
Gay And Proud wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, these days if you want to know your genetic predisposition for various health issues the best way to get that info is to use a genetic testing service like 23andme.com . Even having access to your biological family's history doesn't always help with medical history info.
And by the way, think of the money that could be saved if the medical records came with the baby, kind of like operating instructions that come with your dishwasher.

Since: Apr 08

Chagrin Falls, OH

#48 Feb 11, 2013
RalphB wrote:
<quoted text>
And by the way, think of the money that could be saved if the medical records came with the baby, kind of like operating instructions that come with your dishwasher.
It's still a gamble no matter what the circumstances. With our two adopted kids we do have full access to their bio family info (we keep in touch with pretty much everyone except for bio mom and bio dad) and there is still a huge amount of info that just isn't known.

“Equality First”

Since: Jan 09

St. Louis, MO

#49 Feb 11, 2013
Gay And Proud wrote:
<quoted text>
It's still a gamble no matter what the circumstances. With our two adopted kids we do have full access to their bio family info (we keep in touch with pretty much everyone except for bio mom and bio dad) and there is still a huge amount of info that just isn't known.
Once I completed all the genealogical research I had set for myself, which was in 2000, I began to build a database for each branch of our family that included all known medical info that they were willing to share, plus what I learned from some public records, such as death certificates. It is a huge undertaking, but has already shown promising results. When I die it will be transferred to a trusted relative for future reference.

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