Mexico is most dangerous country on t...

Mexico is most dangerous country on the planet

There are 53 comments on the The Sun Online story from Mar 26, 2013, titled Mexico is most dangerous country on the planet. In it, The Sun Online reports that:

Notices pinned to the corpses with ice-picks warned the same would happen to "muggers, car thieves and burglars as well as kidnappers, rapists and blackmailers". They are the latest victims of a drug gang called the Knights Templar - one of many cartels enforcing their own vigilante laws in a country with one of the highest crime rates in the ... (more)

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Sun Online.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#21 Apr 8, 2013
I'm a American living in Mexico. I don't buy or sale drugs. I feel very safe here. Infact the FBI 's reports say that 274 Americans have died in Mexico in the last 6 (SIX) years. That includes Car and motorcycle accidents. Were is the warning about going to Phoenix Az.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

#22 Apr 8, 2013
Kevin McDermott wrote:
I'm a American living in Mexico. I don't buy or sale drugs. I feel very safe here. Infact the FBI 's reports say that 274 Americans have died in Mexico in the last 6 (SIX) years. That includes Car and motorcycle accidents. Were is the warning about going to Phoenix Az.
I agree with you. Americans if they do not look Mexican are much safer in Mexico. But if you go to the areas I go off the beaten paths you take a chance of not necessarily death but vehicle theft, or other crime. I rarely see an American in those areas. Most of the criminals and drug dealers and sicarios drive stolen cars. I also love to go where most tourists do not go. Places where they rarely see a gringo. But I have curtailed that for now.

If you own a business here and are Mexican you stand a better chance of being killed. Much higher if you work in the drug industry.

You are right about Phoenix Arizona as will as other areas. Like Los Angeles as an example. The Latino gangs are thick in both those areas. Also Black gangs. Lots of crime. But most of the murders and shootings are leveled against other Latinos and Blacks. I looked up the LA 10 Most Wanted a while back. 9 of the 10 most wanted where Hispanic and all of the people that they killed had Hispanic names. So Hispanics and Blacks are feeling most of the serious crime in the USA also. The bad and most dangerous places to be are the barrios. Home invasions were not known in the USA until the influx of illegal Hispanic's into the USA. I grew up there so I know. Everyone knows that no matter what your ethnicity is.

In Utah where I grew up the there was very few Blacks and Mexicans. West valley has become the home of the Latino population there. The murders, home invasions mainly come out of that city.

Here where I live I have my car garaged and windows barred. Tall walls and razor wire on top and I live in a nice area. Like all the houses in Mexico tehy are basically prisons to keep people out. They are that way for a reason and it is not to keep the kids from getting out.

In the neighborhood I grew up in we later had house burglaries and a few car burglaries but those were attributed to some uneducated white trash morons on the corner. The kids have since gone to prison as I have been told, so the burglaries have stopped I have been told.

There were some Hispanics and Blacks that moved into the neighborhood before I left but they were hard working decent people and were just good Americans living the better life. They were actually my friends also. The houses were more expensive in that area. The price of the houses in West Valley City, Ut dropped when the crime came in and they are still cheap. That is also the area where you will find the illegals living. I am sure if you google West Valley City crime you can find out what I am talking about.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#24 Apr 8, 2013
Concerned wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree with you. Americans if they do not look Mexican are much safer in Mexico. But if you go to the areas I go off the beaten paths you take a chance of not necessarily death but vehicle theft, or other crime. I rarely see an American in those areas. Most of the criminals and drug dealers and sicarios drive stolen cars. I also love to go where most tourists do not go. Places where they rarely see a gringo. But I have curtailed that for now.
If you own a business here and are Mexican you stand a better chance of being killed. Much higher if you work in the drug industry.
You are right about Phoenix Arizona as will as other areas. Like Los Angeles as an example. The Latino gangs are thick in both those areas. Also Black gangs. Lots of crime. But most of the murders and shootings are leveled against other Latinos and Blacks. I looked up the LA 10 Most Wanted a while back. 9 of the 10 most wanted where Hispanic and all of the people that they killed had Hispanic names. So Hispanics and Blacks are feeling most of the serious crime in the USA also. The bad and most dangerous places to be are the barrios. Home invasions were not known in the USA until the influx of illegal Hispanic's into the USA. I grew up there so I know. Everyone knows that no matter what your ethnicity is.
In Utah where I grew up the there was very few Blacks and Mexicans. West valley has become the home of the Latino population there. The murders, home invasions mainly come out of that city.
Here where I live I have my car garaged and windows barred. Tall walls and razor wire on top and I live in a nice area. Like all the houses in Mexico tehy are basically prisons to keep people out. They are that way for a reason and it is not to keep the kids from getting out.
In the neighborhood I grew up in we later had house burglaries and a few car burglaries but those were attributed to some uneducated white trash morons on the corner. The kids have since gone to prison as I have been told, so the burglaries have stopped I have been told.
There were some Hispanics and Blacks that moved into the neighborhood before I left but they were hard working decent people and were just good Americans living the better life. They were actually my friends also. The houses were more expensive in that area. The price of the houses in West Valley City, Ut dropped when the crime came in and they are still cheap. That is also the area where you will find the illegals living. I am sure if you google West Valley City crime you can find out what I am talking about.
I guess the bottomline is if you deal with bad people you get bad results. Any were in the world. Mexico is no better and no worst then any were else.
Eduardo

Monclova, Mexico

#25 Apr 9, 2013
I think the debate over whether or not drug should be legalized and what to do with the Narcos aren't that linked.
The Narcos started selling drugs but they have gone way too far already, they decided themselves to cross that line instead of looking for an amnesty and starting again with an honest job or facing the fact they their business was becoming less profitable, and they are more like rabid dogs now: they are always going to be a threat to society is just a matter of time before they hurt someone again.
Illegal drugs on the other hand seem to be a rather profitable business. One that you can't tax, file a suit against or force to follow health regulations. When I think that the people who consume them are actually doing it willingly, and that these consumers can be anything from a loser without future to a soon-to-be prominent politician: Bill Clinton, G.W. Bush, and Barack Obama all seem to have at least given it a try and that hardly ruined their lives.
Eduardo

Monclova, Mexico

#26 Apr 9, 2013
That doesn't change the fact that the priority of this Drug War was stopping the cartels from smuggling drugs out of the country and that the spike of violence was the cartels response to that.
Eduardo

Monclova, Mexico

#27 Apr 9, 2013
I both did say Junkies from "Mexico, United States, and Canada" (since the victims of the drugs seem to be global as opposed to the victims of the violence which are overwhelmingly Mexican) and never stated that I expected United States to stop smugglers sending weapons from their territory, it would probably even take an arm embargo on Mexico to make that happen. I expect Mexico to be tougher on the weapon smugglers trying to enter the country whether they come from USA or any other country.

I a guess we both agree that the Narcos are the first ones to be blamed for all this problem, but in my list whoever is giving them AR-15's and AK-47's has the second place hands down. The argument that if someone doesn't sell weapons someone else will could be applied to the drug trafficking too with the difference that is a lot harder to kill people chasing them with a syringe with a lethal dose of Heroin than with an assault rifle.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

#28 Apr 9, 2013
Eduardo.

Very good and well thought out posts.

I do see a drug war. But in my mind it is obvious who is really at war. It is the drug dealers against each other. They are taking it very serious.

Cutting off supplies and building walls and searching for tunnels and sometimes putting people in jail only to release them is not a war to me. It should be called something else. When they took out the ruthless drug dealers (much like the Mexican drug dealers now) in Columbia, and with vengence. It really made an impact. Now that was a war.

I do not how you stop them from buying arms and smuggling them out of the USA. It seems the USA has it's right to make there own laws and rules. If you stop selling them to people in the USA who look Latin because they might ship them South, you come up against discrimination.

If you asked the drug users of Mexico to stop using drugs and the drug users of USA would do the same. Do you really think that the Mexican drug users would stop for the better good of Mexico. Absolutely not. It is just hypothetical because no country really succeeds against stopping drug users unless they are very oppressive to begin with.

The problem is you have the people smuggling the arms into Mexico many times and passing them through with the help of the police and other agencies. Until Mexico cleans house it will not happen. They invited the man who helped stop the mafia violence in Italy here to Mexico to give them advice, just over a year ago. He said he took down the mafia because he had developed groups of honest police to take out the criminals. He said that because of all the people on the take here in Mexico, in all levels of government that he could not suggest anything to help. It could not happen. I read it in the El Heraldo here in Chihuahua.

I love Mexico. A beautiful country with beautiful people. But I am tired of seeing them hurt and killed and not doing anything to the killers. Only a 1% conviction rate is what I think I read. The people deserve better.
Sirius

Querétaro, Mexico

#29 Apr 9, 2013
I see that Concerned, Eduardo and I think a bit different each. I will state what I think.

(1.) I agree with Concerned that the name War is a little too much for what we have seen.

First we do not see real destruction of infraestructure. "Casualties" are high... but salt and sugar kill 8 to 10 more Mexicans each year, and car accidents is the top cause of dead among young Mexicans. 70,000 death sounds like too much, but Mexico is a huge country.

(2.) I don't know how much the Mexican State obstaculizes drug traffic in transit. But lawlessness and insecurity and rivalry among the cartels are doing a wonderful job: Drug is begining to shift to move by sea, by the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico from Central America.

(3.) This will mean that Cartels will dedicate themselves more to kidnappings, extortions, etc. Probably yes, however that will mean the destruction of the economics of the areas they control. This has been a trend... and since this locust cannot live in Nothing, this will put an negative feedback loop on them.

(4.) I really do not trust much in the Agendas of the goverment of Mexico or the USA in this combat of trafficking. But I believe that our country is extraordinarily resilent, and most people in the whole country have an idea of what kind of progress and evolution and the kind of life they desire for themselves.

I think this surge of narcotraffic is an episode that will subside, if not by design, by the exaustion of some preasures. We already see that violence is not increasing, it is decreasing... routes of drugs are begining to shift outside our country.

I am an optimist.. but I think it will take time.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

#30 Apr 9, 2013
Sirius wrote:
I see that Concerned, Eduardo and I think a bit different each. I will state what I think.
(1.) I agree with Concerned that the name War is a little too much for what we have seen.
First we do not see real destruction of infraestructure. "Casualties" are high... but salt and sugar kill 8 to 10 more Mexicans each year, and car accidents is the top cause of dead among young Mexicans. 70,000 death sounds like too much, but Mexico is a huge country.
(2.) I don't know how much the Mexican State obstaculizes drug traffic in transit. But lawlessness and insecurity and rivalry among the cartels are doing a wonderful job: Drug is begining to shift to move by sea, by the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico from Central America.
(3.) This will mean that Cartels will dedicate themselves more to kidnappings, extortions, etc. Probably yes, however that will mean the destruction of the economics of the areas they control. This has been a trend... and since this locust cannot live in Nothing, this will put an negative feedback loop on them.
(4.) I really do not trust much in the Agendas of the goverment of Mexico or the USA in this combat of trafficking. But I believe that our country is extraordinarily resilent, and most people in the whole country have an idea of what kind of progress and evolution and the kind of life they desire for themselves.
I think this surge of narcotraffic is an episode that will subside, if not by design, by the exaustion of some preasures. We already see that violence is not increasing, it is decreasing... routes of drugs are begining to shift outside our country.
I am an optimist.. but I think it will take time.
Nice report!

I just read that in the first 3 months that the so called drug war has seen more deaths in the first 3 months with Nieto then in the first 3 months will Calderon. It also says the government is try to hide the deaths and violence. It is already going to hide the whereabouts of the top kingpins and where the main players are living.

I was listening to noticias on the radio today and it said that up to 1,400 children have been kidnapped in Morelos and Cuernavaca and had their organs removed and sold.

I know this may sound cold, but I do not want it to be. But people say the guns being taken into the Mexico are the reasons for all the deaths. Some say it is the people who buy the drugs that are to blame. It is like the criminals are not to blame for it. So in my thinking who is to blame for all these poor children being killed for their organs. There is obviously people that need them. Maybe the kids can be blamed for walking around outside in harsh and dangerous times. The people that buy them are obviously criminals or they are in the dark as to where they are coming from.

I personally do not like to pass the blame around, but put it squarely on the shoulders of the people that commit these horrendous acts. The killings over drugs, kidnappings, extortion, human smuggling and more I believe should be placed squarely on the heads of the people that commit these crimes. It is all about greed. That means it would be like saying it is the banks fault they are getting robbed. Because they keep large amounts of money in one place, and this is the reasons these people are robbing banks. I just do not buy this type of philosophy.

This is just in two states in Mexico. There are more states. Are these attributed to the drug war also? Or just criminals, because that is what all these narco's and killers are.

God Bless the Children of Mexico.
donnie

Houston, TX

#31 Apr 9, 2013
More states should legalize pot like Colorado and Washington, I can see this in the future, after all alcohol used to be illegal too right? Gangs fighting over the 'routes'. Just like prohibition days, the law of supply and demand will make sure that this 'war' stays until it reaches the equilibrium point.
Eduardo

Monclova, Mexico

#32 Apr 9, 2013
donnie wrote:
More states should legalize pot like Colorado and Washington, I can see this in the future, after all alcohol used to be illegal too right? Gangs fighting over the 'routes'. Just like prohibition days, the law of supply and demand will make sure that this 'war' stays until it reaches the equilibrium point.
The legalization of drugs won't stop the Narcos, they already moved to other more violent ways to make money to compensate for the loss of profit, is not like they are thinking: "hey, we aren't making as much money as we used to and we need to hire all these additional thugs just to keep up with our rivals, why don't we just give up?".

But the more you consider all points the less sense it seems to make keeping illegal at least some of the drugs better than the Junkies money ends in the hands of some businessmen that can be demanded than in the hands of some sociopath thugs or propping up some radical organizations.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

#33 Apr 9, 2013
Eduardo wrote:
<quoted text>
The legalization of drugs won't stop the Narcos, they already moved to other more violent ways to make money to compensate for the loss of profit, is not like they are thinking: "hey, we aren't making as much money as we used to and we need to hire all these additional thugs just to keep up with our rivals, why don't we just give up?".
But the more you consider all points the less sense it seems to make keeping illegal at least some of the drugs better than the Junkies money ends in the hands of some businessmen that can be demanded than in the hands of some sociopath thugs or propping up some radical organizations.
AGREE!!!
Girl with Hairy Arms

Childress, TX

#34 Apr 10, 2013
maybe they will kill each other off
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

#35 Apr 10, 2013
Girl with Hairy Arms wrote:
maybe they will kill each other off
That would be good if the criminals would do that. But it is the innocents I am worried about! The criminals are really taking it to the people.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#36 Apr 11, 2013
Ex-presadent Fox wants all drugs to be legal in Mexico and let the U.S. deal with there problem. I agree.
dirty filthy

Fort Lauderdale, FL

#37 Apr 29, 2013
lazy, stupid mexicans.
S_i_r_i_u_s

Querétaro, Mexico

#38 Apr 29, 2013
To say that "Mexico is the most dangerous country in the World", is obviously a falses statement.

Just last year, 22 million people (including 16 million Americans) went to Mexico, and you very rearely hear that these people is harmed.

Secondly, statistics in number of murders per 100,000 inhabitants, show that México is an average Latin American country regarding murders, very slighly above South America and much better than most Central America.

To say falsely that Mexico is the most dangerous country in the world, could only be understood as

(a.) The simple look for profit from a tabloid.

(b.) The following of a campaign against Mexico by some international interests.

Answer (a.) is not important.

Answer (b.) would require to delve into which are those interests, what they seek. Is this a blackmail for something?

Whatever it is, we should not give up.

----------

How could Mexico be seriously considered the most dangerous country, when in intenet there has been famous videos like "The cannibal warlords of Liberia".



Obviously it is something that wants to install fear and prevent the people from going to Mexico.

Why? Hopelly we will know.
Serrano Red

United States

#39 May 31, 2013
if i could i would wipe mexico off the face of the earth
Sirius

Querétaro, Mexico

#40 Jun 1, 2013
Serrano Red wrote:
if i could i would wipe mexico off the face of the earth
Run for president.

And even so I doubt it will be an easy task.
Sirius

Querétaro, Mexico

#41 Jun 1, 2013
"Mexico the most dangerous country in the Planet"

Think about this statement, really stop for a minute in digesting it.

Ready?

Now think that 23 million people visit Mexico each year, including 16 million "Americans", and that 1 million of Americans live in Mexico.

Are they nuts?

Why they don't go to, for example, Liberia



After all, if Mexico is "the most dangerous country in the Planet" everywhere should be better, right?

----------

Ofensive of the international press against Mexico (which is mild compared with that against, say, Cuba... and infinitelly mild compared with Syria, but still is an aggression) is not going to change the policies of Mexico in whatever realm it is intended. At least I hope so.

Regards.

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