Mexico is most dangerous country on the planet

Mar 26, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: The Sun Online

Notices pinned to the corpses with ice-picks warned the same would happen to "muggers, car thieves and burglars as well as kidnappers, rapists and blackmailers". They are the latest victims of a drug gang called the Knights Templar - one of many cartels enforcing their own vigilante laws in a country with one of the highest crime rates in the ... (more)

Comments
1 - 20 of 53 Comments Last updated Jun 2, 2013
First Prev
of 3
Next Last
Jersey Shore boy

Langhorne, PA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#1
Apr 1, 2013
 

Judged:

1

I see you never heard about Ivory Coast in Africa.
Sirius

Querétaro, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2
Apr 1, 2013
 
"The Sun" is a famous British sensationalist tabloid.

Brazil is about to celebrate Olympic Games with a higher murder rate than Mexico.

Certainly some parts of the country are currently very dangerous, but as the article say 300,000 British visit Mexico yearly...

----------

The problem is that graphically is impressive. But when you look at the statistics, Mexico is an average Latin American country regarding murder and other crimes.
pinchejuan

Georgetown, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#3
Apr 1, 2013
 

Judged:

1

Sun Online. Good to know yet another news source with no need for silly things like facts or truth. Common ownership as Fox Noise Fake News.
well

Hamilton, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#4
Apr 1, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Wherever subhumans live there's no peaceful life.
Sirius

Querétaro, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5
Apr 1, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Wherever subhumans live there's no peaceful life.
Mmmmm.... Subhumans like this?

http://www.antipasministries.com/images/jpeg/...

Or like this?

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-uhHuhGBX1B0/TuvL2jY...

----------

Have Canada sent rockets to Space?

Tell you a little secret,@well?

Well before the USA put a man on the Moon, we Mexicans already reached space, with our own rockets.

That we have mismanaged a little after that, doesn't worry me a lot. Sometimes you are high... sometimes you are down.

We Mexicans are a civilization of 6000 years, if we want to rescue our full heritage.

I know there are sensible Canadians out there, that will reach for the hand we Mexicans always offer to anyone. A lot of Canadians do good businesess with Mexico.

You on the other hand, could freeze the whole winter if you want. Please don't ever come to "subhumanland".

;)
Serrano Red

Perryton, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#6
Apr 7, 2013
 
worse than somalia
Sirius

Querétaro, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#7
Apr 7, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Serrano Red wrote:
worse than somalia
Why not? I don't know how is Somalia nowadays, and I don't take the effort to go to check.

"Somalia" would mean something for the Americans ("ingrateful", etc.), not for us. It is a country in the horn of Africa, to which we don't desire anything bad.

Springbreak... and the 30,000 rooms in Cancun with occupation of 95%.

----------

Objectively, some regions of Mexico are pretty dangerous. It "rotates", slowly... only when the mentality of the people is hopelessly stubborn and stupid, the thing lingers.

How many people have been killed in Siria? 70,000. And in México? 80,000 - 100,000... and we Mexicans (the overwhelming majority of Mexicans) do not even feel it.

Sometimes, when you read about violent events happening in remote countries, you will hear things that seems very hard... like a Serb that say that Bosnians are this or that, or Russians saying that Chechens are this or that... and you resent it. I resent that.

What do you thing, that I think of people whose objective in life is to drive a GMC/Ford truck, horribly painted, with ghetto blasters to hear narcocorridos? These people is result from an abandonment of the responsabilities of the Mexican State, in two fronts... as provider and organizaer of the civil life, and educator in Civism. But if it failed later, was also because these regions produce first conservatives and reactionaries that sabotaged and allways where against the progressive programs and tenets of the Mexican Revolution.

But the evil self-destruct,... because evil is destructive. What we perceive as Karama and some kind of moral necessity, it is also supported by a logic dynamics of the System. Of couse, shi.t happens... but at the end, you could perceive, if you ever do, in the very long run, the beauty of equilibrium and natural balances.

I don't know why you hate Mexico, Serrano. You are one more in the legion here.

Regarding your assertion: México is EXACTLY IN THE MIDDLE of violence per-capita among the Latin American countries, and so the statistics show.

Why is Mexico perceived as more violent? I suppose that it is because that "concentrated violence" in some regions is more aparatose. The "goodwill" that some media have for us, helps also.

But we continue our way.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#8
Apr 7, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

How many people have been killed in Siria? 70,000. And in México? 80,000 - 100,000... and we Mexicans (the overwhelming majority of Mexicans) do not even feel it.

I seriously doubt that. Police, soldiers, Reporters,Politicians, Engineers, Doctors, lawyers, judges, poor people, businesses, acquaintances, fellow employees and I would guess just about 95% of the people in Mexico are being effected by the drug cartels and vicious gangs. These people all have friends and family that have been effected and killed. Many are missing and unaccounted for.

If they do not feel it, it is because they do not care. I can tell you without a doubt that the majority of people have been effected. I personally could give you a list of all the people know that have been effected through deaths and I am not Mexican. Mexicans have big families. When you go to a cumpleano, or a quincinera, or a large family gathering you hear about the friends and relatives that have been lost.

Eduardo

Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#9
Apr 7, 2013
 
Sirius wrote:
<quoted text>
How many people have been killed in Siria? 70,000. And in México? 80,000 - 100,000... and we Mexicans (the overwhelming majority of Mexicans) do not even feel it.
That's because Mexico has 5 times the population of Syria and the Mexican Drug War has been around for more than 6 years while the Syrian Civil War has been around for 2 years.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#10
Apr 7, 2013
 
Eduardo wrote:
<quoted text>
That's because Mexico has 5 times the population of Syria and the Mexican Drug War has been around for more than 6 years while the Syrian Civil War has been around for 2 years.
What do you think of this?

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2013/04/mexican...

I cannot believe they would try and hide the identity and the whereabouts of the criminals that live among the people.
Eduardo

Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#11
Apr 7, 2013
 
So it's more like if Mexico Drug War's death toll for the first 2 years would had been 350,000 instead of around 20,000.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#12
Apr 7, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

Eduardo wrote:
<quoted text>
That's because Mexico has 5 times the population of Syria and the Mexican Drug War has been around for more than 6 years while the Syrian Civil War has been around for 2 years.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_civil_war

The war in Syria is different. It is a real war! People trying to take back their country from a very corrupt government. The war in Mexico is Narco's against Narco's and the collateral damage to the innocents. You could not compare a war for ideals and freedom against a drug war. If it was a real war you would see all out assaults on the drug dealers. The casualties would be huge in Mexico. But there are few prisoners taken by the government in comparison to the amount of Cartel's and they know where most of the criminals live. Here in Chihuahua the police department and soldiers know exactly where many of the drug dealers live. So does the government. I can go with my wife and she can go into the pueblos she grew up in and point out every house and property that is owned by drug dealers. So can many other people from other pueblos. If it was a war they would be taking them out like the people are doing an all out assault in Syria. You have a housing project for soldiers here in Chihuahua on one side of the street and a group of sicario's that live on the other side of the street. They have worked out some kind of agreement to not bother each other. Most of the people here know about it. It is nothing new. If it was an all out war stuff like this would not be happening.
Eduardo

Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#13
Apr 7, 2013
 
So you actually want it to have more casualties for you to consider it a "real war"?
First you Gringos complain about the number of casualties and when pointed up that it isn't really as high as even other countries in Latin America and is concentrated on strategic logistic points for the drug trade you actually complain that isn't even that high because is not a real war?
Why would someone want to have hundreds of thousands innocents killed from collateral damage in Mexico just to prevent the Junkies in Mexico, USA, and Canada from getting high even though no one is forcing them to consume that junk?
I would understand if it was for a higher cause than to save the lives of a bunch of addicts like the one Syria (probably) has.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#14
Apr 7, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Eduardo wrote:
So you actually want it to have more casualties for you to consider it a "real war"?
First you Gringos complain about the number of casualties and when pointed up that it isn't really as high as even other countries in Latin America and is concentrated on strategic logistic points for the drug trade you actually complain that isn't even that high because is not a real war?
Why would someone want to have hundreds of thousands innocents killed from collateral damage in Mexico just to prevent the Junkies in Mexico, USA, and Canada from getting high even though no one is forcing them to consume that junk?
I would understand if it was for a higher cause than to save the lives of a bunch of addicts like the one Syria (probably) has.
When you go to war you go for it, or it will go on forever. Have you seen what real wars are like? This is not like a war that is trying to be won. If it was you would see more prosecutions and criminals being killed. So as it stands the people of Mexico are being slow simmered, as they are subjected to the extortion and crime against the innocents. Even the people are taking up arms because they know who the criminals are. They are sick of it. They even arrest the people that are supposed to be on their side like in Guerrero. The police and higher ups. The vigilantes are tired of it. They know the police and the soldiers will not take any criminals out most of the time even if they tell them where they are. You know that, right? It is in the papers in Mexico. I am not making this up. You have been reading the papers have you not? I am just repeating what the papers and reports are in Mexico. In Syria it has been a bloody war. It was a bloody war during the civil war in the USA to give the Blacks rights. There was a lot of blood spilled and lives lost, but it was settled. In Mexico if you do not go for it the bodies will keep piling up and more people will join the gangs because they know they can get away with a lot.

In my opinion they need to legalize drugs in the USA just as Mexico has. The users are the victims. The money made could be used for prevention, education and therapy. Not going to criminals that want gold guns, big mansions and power. That would be the smartest thing for Mexico and the USA. You will never stop the users in any country. Just think if the Mexican government made the drugs and sold them it could also be used to stop much of the low level street crime just like it would in the ghettos of America.

I am glad I met my wife, and got her out of her job. She sold clothes and her boss was her best friend. Her boss is a wonderful and hard working woman. Right now they are being extorted and pay to La Linea. They are now being hit up by another Narco group and they are going to have to pay them also or go out of business. Her husband was recently chased and shot at but he was not killed. Did not report it because it would do no good and only make it worse for her and him. I do not want my wife to be working there if they decide to come in and kill them and their employees over the extortion money.
Serrano Red

Perryton, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#15
Apr 7, 2013
 
The cartel is the government. The whole country is corrupt. Legalizing drugs will not help this country and mexihole are gone
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#16
Apr 7, 2013
 
Eduardo wrote:
So you actually want it to have more casualties for you to consider it a "real war"?
First you Gringos complain about the number of casualties and when pointed up that it isn't really as high as even other countries in Latin America and is concentrated on strategic logistic points for the drug trade you actually complain that isn't even that high because is not a real war?
Why would someone want to have hundreds of thousands innocents killed from collateral damage in Mexico just to prevent the Junkies in Mexico, USA, and Canada from getting high even though no one is forcing them to consume that junk?
I would understand if it was for a higher cause than to save the lives of a bunch of addicts like the one Syria (probably) has.
I talk to the people here. They are for the death penalty. They want more action from the government to protect them. They feel lost and helpless. Like they are thrown into a big sea without a life jacket. Ir would mean more deaths, but hopefully the deaths of criminals. Then hopefully things could just come down to petty crime and not extortion, kidnapping, human smuggling and more.

You do not need to tell me about the problems in the USA. I also write and bitch about all the problems there. But after all this is the Mexico forum. One thing for sure is I despise the hate spewed out at a total group of people of ethnicity because of the crimes of others. If that makes any sense.

Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#17
Apr 7, 2013
 
Eduardo wrote:
So you actually want it to have more casualties for you to consider it a "real war"?
First you Gringos complain about the number of casualties and when pointed up that it isn't really as high as even other countries in Latin America and is concentrated on strategic logistic points for the drug trade you actually complain that isn't even that high because is not a real war?
Why would someone want to have hundreds of thousands innocents killed from collateral damage in Mexico just to prevent the Junkies in Mexico, USA, and Canada from getting high even though no one is forcing them to consume that junk?
I would understand if it was for a higher cause than to save the lives of a bunch of addicts like the one Syria (probably) has.
It is not a real war in my eyes. Tell me one real war that is fought like this? It is just labeled a war. The only war I see is the Narco's against the Narco's and criminals hurting the innocents. There is no real war on drugs by the USA or Mexico. The USA puts their criminals back on the streets just as Mexico does.
Eduardo

Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#18
Apr 7, 2013
 
If this was a war against people being kidnapped and dying in the crossfire they would be stopping and destroying the illegal weapons being smuggled into Mexico not the drugs being smuggled out of Mexico. It is a war against Junkies getting high not against civilians being victims of organized crime.

In fact didn't the cartels started to take money on the side (kidnapping, extortion, arm robbery...) as they had a harder time making money out drug trafficking? Yet they still seem to be packing some serious heat, and the Gringos solution being "buy guns too", is not surprising considering that they are the ones selling them.

I am also for the death penalty, I would buy that the Mexican or the USA government are serious on this if they treated the Narcos the same way they are treated in Malaysia or in the People's Republic of China. But I don't mind that is not a real war since we are fighting for a cause in which I don't believe, and hardly find worthy of sacrificing hundreds of thousands of Mexican lives each year.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#19
Apr 8, 2013
 
Eduardo wrote:
If this was a war against people being kidnapped and dying in the crossfire they would be stopping and destroying the illegal weapons being smuggled into Mexico not the drugs being smuggled out of Mexico. It is a war against Junkies getting high not against civilians being victims of organized crime.
In fact didn't the cartels started to take money on the side (kidnapping, extortion, arm robbery...) as they had a harder time making money out drug trafficking? Yet they still seem to be packing some serious heat, and the Gringos solution being "buy guns too", is not surprising considering that they are the ones selling them.
I am also for the death penalty, I would buy that the Mexican or the USA government are serious on this if they treated the Narcos the same way they are treated in Malaysia or in the People's Republic of China. But I don't mind that is not a real war since we are fighting for a cause in which I don't believe, and hardly find worthy of sacrificing hundreds of thousands of Mexican lives each year.
That is very naive. If the USA was not on their back door and the easiest and closet place to buy guns. They would be buying them from some other country. They have plenty of money to do so. Venezuela would be happy to supply them. You do realize they are now selling drugs to Australia and other eastern countries from Mexico. Mexican drug dealers are globalizing. The junkies are in Mexico, the USA and all over the world. Junkies are not the reason people are killing each other. It is greed and power. They do not just kill each other. They slaughter, torture and make examples out of each other. Many of these people are not sacrificing their lives. They are unwilling participants and good people. They are now forming vigilante groups so that they will not have to become unwilling participants. I cannot own or carry a gun in Mexico. But it might come in handy someday if I could. Hell they buy their precursors for making drug from China. The guns could come from anywhere. If they can ship to other countries, they can buy from other countries anything they want.

We do agree on some things. But it is alright to talk. Talk hurts no one.
Concerned

Chihuahua, Mexico

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#20
Apr 8, 2013
 
Eduardo wrote:
If this was a war against people being kidnapped and dying in the crossfire they would be stopping and destroying the illegal weapons being smuggled into Mexico not the drugs being smuggled out of Mexico. It is a war against Junkies getting high not against civilians being victims of organized crime.
In fact didn't the cartels started to take money on the side (kidnapping, extortion, arm robbery...) as they had a harder time making money out drug trafficking? Yet they still seem to be packing some serious heat, and the Gringos solution being "buy guns too", is not surprising considering that they are the ones selling them.
I am also for the death penalty, I would buy that the Mexican or the USA government are serious on this if they treated the Narcos the same way they are treated in Malaysia or in the People's Republic of China. But I don't mind that is not a real war since we are fighting for a cause in which I don't believe, and hardly find worthy of sacrificing hundreds of thousands of Mexican lives each year.
You made this statement and I thought about it as I was going to bed.

In fact didn't the cartels started to take money on the side (kidnapping, extortion, arm robbery...) as they had a harder time making money out drug trafficking? Yet they still seem to be packing some serious heat, and the Gringos solution being "buy guns too", is not surprising considering that they are the ones selling them.

You say when the drugs started to become a problem crossing they started to take money on the side. Let's say that the drugs are legalized. That would cut their drug trafficking business to about nothing, not just cut into it. That of course would really cut into their lifestyle as they would be making far, far less. So in your thinking as well as mine, the crime against the innocents, kidnapping, extortion, human smuggling, stealing oil, coal and other enterprises would really go up. Mexico would become extremely dangerous for the people. Because they would go directly to doing crimes against the Mexican people as you say in your comment. After they are criminals and they are armed. Who would you blame it one then? Surely not the drug addicts. But they would still be trying to sell more drugs in Mexico and threatening any legal sales if Mexico permitted it. They would still want control in Mexico even if drugs were legalized in Mexico. They could not do that in the USA. They could not go after the sellers and growers there.

I am just asking for what your opinion is. Maybe make it a little clearer. As it is obvious as to what I read in your post.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

First Prev
of 3
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

•••