United States must help Mexico combat drug traffickers, envoy says

Mexico is facing a strong and growing threat from transnational criminal organizations, leaving the United States little choice but to assist its southern neighbor or risk an increasingly grave threat to its own security, U.S. Ambassador Carlos Pascual said Friday. Full Story
Nacho

El Paso, TX

#108 Dec 17, 2009
Ethics Commission wrote:
<quoted text>
I understand what you are saying and you do bring up some great points. I am just saying that if we start with our young children that is really our only help to turn this crisis around. Despite what we say, all roads and behaviors start with parents teaching their children the right things about drugs. True, some of children will want to be adventurous and try outexciting experiences. And true we cannot watch them 24 hours a day. However we can look for signs of drug use: bruided arms. sluggish behavior, slurred speech, change in appetite, etc. I still believe it starts at home. All roads lead to home. Many decades ago an entire neighborhood helped to raise our children. Remember the book "It Takes a Village." We need to get back to that concept. Also, having God in your life and praying would be helpful.
Nice statement.
Nacho

El Paso, TX

#109 Dec 17, 2009
Benjamin:

Did you ever hear about the banana wars. It is where one dominant group wanted to be the sole supplier of a product. Yes this really did happen.

And it was about bananas.

This business is a monster because it will never be controlled. You think your illegal substance of choice is only benefiting the user. The supplier has to answer to somebody and payoff what the seller of the product. There maybe many middleman who all take their cut.

Check out California and some of the counties who allow it for personal use. It is an expensive venture and costly to get started. If you like it so much work to legalize small quantities and what is happening in California.

Beware in these counties and others are mini- drug wars happening. These communities are now experiencing violent crime, theft, and other crimes due to the personal use of illegal substances.
benjamin

Carlisle, PA

#110 Dec 18, 2009
Gunslinger915 wrote:
<quoted text> Well lets see. The Mexicans legalized, decriminalized "personal amounts of marijuana, heroin, Cocaine and meth, a few months ago. What exactly did it get them?? The murder toll is up to more than 2,500. 20 dead in Juarez in LESS than 24 hours. Got two weeks left to make it an even 3,000 for the year. All the Mexican legalization did was fix it so that everybody can have a "personal stash" of whatever they like walking around the streets. The cartels have NOT stopped shooting, killing and they get even more street sales. So what did their "legalization" accomplish?? The cartels are STILL in business and still fighting the government. It's idiots like you that really believe that IF the U.S. would just legalize dope, the cartels would simply fold up, go out of business and even give up the multi-Billion dollar business they have. I know, they will all just go into business making pan dulce and tortillas. So who exactly believes that the cartels will just lay down, will STOP controlling the drug markets and give up their BILLION dollar business? To them "legalizing" just means their is more market, more they can sell without any fear of Law Enforcement. Somebody is going to control the dope, the sales, the market areas, the price, the quality. What if somebody tries to put up a cheaper price, tries to take over another area, buys mota from the "Wrong" supplier? The shooting, murders just going to keep on going or maybe the drug lords will simply walk away and take the losses??
Are you kidding me or are you really this nieve. Mexican decriminaliztion and legalization in America are two differant things. Decriminalization is the worst idea ever. It makes sence to take personal cannabis users out of the criminal ranks, however by decriminalizing cannabis in america does nothing to produce a legal supply. This is a major problem, how can it be semi-legal to possess something that is completly illegal to sell? Don't try to compare the two as legalization would provide americans with jobs and legal marijuana while decriminalization would give americans nothing.

While mexico has decriminalized small amount of all drugs for personal use they have done nothing to supply a legal source of the drugs. One still needs to go to a drug dealer, so while the cartels are the ones dealing there will continue to be violence in Mexico.

What is so hard to understand that with marijuana and marijuana only we could really hurt the mexican cartels. If cannabis were legal all over the U.S. the price of cannabis would dramatically be reduced. As of now an ounce of good home grown pot costs anywhere from $250-600 depending on the strain, supply of said strain,and who you know. The reason that people are willing to pay so much for a plant that grows anywhere is because in order to grow now one is taking a huge risk of getting in trouble. That is what sets the price of pot the risk factor. Now if everyone who wanted to supply themselves could obtain a permit to grow a personal sized garden cannabis would virtually be worthless. Who is going to pay for it when you can grow it in your backyard? So what choice would the cartels have at this point? They basically with this senario just lost 60% if not more of their business. At this point what choice do they have? They are not going to have the cannabis market to constantly fund their operations. This is the oppurtunity that the D.E.A needs to finally concentrate and seek out the hard drugs being smuggled into this country.
benjamin

Carlisle, PA

#111 Dec 18, 2009
Nacho wrote:
Benjamin:
Did you ever hear about the banana wars. It is where one dominant group wanted to be the sole supplier of a product. Yes this really did happen.
And it was about bananas.
This business is a monster because it will never be controlled. You think your illegal substance of choice is only benefiting the user. The supplier has to answer to somebody and payoff what the seller of the product. There maybe many middleman who all take their cut.
Check out California and some of the counties who allow it for personal use. It is an expensive venture and costly to get started. If you like it so much work to legalize small quantities and what is happening in California.
Beware in these counties and others are mini- drug wars happening. These communities are now experiencing violent crime, theft, and other crimes due to the personal use of illegal substances.
Bananas are a climate sensitive produce, so yes a product with a very restricted supply could cause economic strains and 'wars' over said product. We see it with drugs, some of these drugs are climate sensitive and that restricts what regions in the world they can be produced in. This is not the case for cannabis, it can grow everywhere on the face of the plant(with exception of the poles) So cannabis if it were legalized could be grown by anyone anywhere. Do you not realize that if everyone who wanted to use cannabis could grow their own the pot would basically be worth nothing? Who would spend money on pot when you have a garden in the back yard? Would you continue to pay for gas if you could produce your own in your backyard? Same concept.

One major problem that California has that no one has admited is they are the most leniant state when it comes to cannabis. So yes, there will be problems in certain areas who allow something that is completly illegal in most of the country. Criminals will flock to the pot rich cities to steal from the people who are farming a valueable crop. There are areas in California where basically the entire local economy depends on cannabis, without cannabis some of the towns in northern California would be dirt poor. California's problems with the mini-drug wars will not stop until there is uniform law around the nation allowing for legal cannabis.
benjamin

Carlisle, PA

#112 Dec 18, 2009
Kathy Daw wrote:
<quoted text>B!!!!What's wrong with planes or drones dropping herbicides, I bet it would be a whole let less than the cost of the loss of lives!!!!
WOW!!!Imagine that!Planes are more than capable of doing this now. Farmers do it all the time. And, B, the DEA obviously knows where the growing is. HELLO!!!!!But, OH,..this just makes too much sence, so never mind.
So now you want to drop chemicals all over the planet to wipe out plants? Who cares what ill effects all those chemicals will have on the enviroment and people around these drug fields? What is the goal of drug prohibition anyway? I was under the impression that it is to protect the children from the evils of drugs. There is a much better way to protect the children and that is to teach them the truth. Tell your children how you feel about drugs, but include the truth. It may just save their life one day!
Gunslinger915

El Paso, TX

#113 Dec 18, 2009
benjamin wrote:
<quoted text>Are you kidding me or are you really this nieve. Mexican decriminaliztion and legalization in America are two differant things. Decriminalization is the worst idea ever. It makes sence to take personal cannabis users out of the criminal ranks, however by decriminalizing cannabis in america does nothing to produce a legal supply. This is a major problem, how can it be semi-legal to possess something that is completly illegal to sell? Don't try to compare the two as legalization would provide americans with jobs and legal marijuana while decriminalization would give americans nothing.
While mexico has decriminalized small amount of all drugs for personal use they have done nothing to supply a legal source of the drugs. One still needs to go to a drug dealer, so while the cartels are the ones dealing there will continue to be violence in Mexico.
What is so hard to understand that with marijuana and marijuana only we could really hurt the mexican cartels. If cannabis were legal all over the U.S. the price of cannabis would dramatically be reduced. As of now an ounce of good home grown pot costs anywhere from $250-600 depending on the strain, supply of said strain,and who you know. The reason that people are willing to pay so much for a plant that grows anywhere is because in order to grow now one is taking a huge risk of getting in trouble. That is what sets the price of pot the risk factor. Now if everyone who wanted to supply themselves could obtain a permit to grow a personal sized garden cannabis would virtually be worthless. Who is going to pay for it when you can grow it in your backyard? So what choice would the cartels have at this point? They basically with this senario just lost 60% if not more of their business. At this point what choice do they have? They are not going to have the cannabis market to constantly fund their operations. This is the oppurtunity that the D.E.A needs to finally concentrate and seek out the hard drugs being smuggled into this country.
Naive?? The fact that you are posting from somewhere in Pennsylvania and NOT the Southwest, Mexican Border, tells me all I need to know about, exactly what you KNOW on the subject of illegal drugs. Maybe come down to the border and get an education in reality.
benjamin

Carlisle, PA

#114 Dec 18, 2009
Gunslinger915 wrote:
<quoted text> Naive?? The fact that you are posting from somewhere in Pennsylvania and NOT the Southwest, Mexican Border, tells me all I need to know about, exactly what you KNOW on the subject of illegal drugs. Maybe come down to the border and get an education in reality.
Well I may not live on the Mexican border, but I assure you I know more of the cannabis trade then you. If you like the current condition of the Mexican border region and the way the U.S government is handling the problem then by all means continue to believe the false truth about cannabis. I guarantee that legalizing cannabis is the only way that things down your way will get any better. The proof is in history. We have seen improvement ever under current policy. Keep doing what we do and people are going to continue to wind up dead.
benjamin

Carlisle, PA

#115 Dec 18, 2009
benjamin wrote:
<quoted text>Are you kidding me or are you really this nieve. Mexican decriminaliztion and legalization in America are two differant things. Decriminalization is the worst idea ever. It makes sence to take personal cannabis users out of the criminal ranks, however by decriminalizing cannabis in america does nothing to produce a legal supply. This is a major problem, how can it be semi-legal to possess something that is completly illegal to sell? Don't try to compare the two as legalization would provide americans with jobs and legal marijuana while decriminalization would give americans nothing.
While mexico has decriminalized small amount of all drugs for personal use they have done nothing to supply a legal source of the drugs. One still needs to go to a drug dealer, so while the cartels are the ones dealing there will continue to be violence in Mexico.
What is so hard to understand that with marijuana and marijuana only we could really hurt the mexican cartels. If cannabis were legal all over the U.S. the price of cannabis would dramatically be reduced. As of now an ounce of good home grown pot costs anywhere from $250-600 depending on the strain, supply of said strain,and who you know. The reason that people are willing to pay so much for a plant that grows anywhere is because in order to grow now one is taking a huge risk of getting in trouble. That is what sets the price of pot the risk factor. Now if everyone who wanted to supply themselves could obtain a permit to grow a personal sized garden cannabis would virtually be worthless. Who is going to pay for it when you can grow it in your backyard? So what choice would the cartels have at this point? They basically with this senario just lost 60% if not more of their business. At this point what choice do they have? They are not going to have the cannabis market to constantly fund their operations. This is the oppurtunity that the D.E.A needs to finally concentrate and seek out the hard drugs being smuggled into this country.
Gunslinger: Why don't you try to refute any of this common sence approach, instead of pointing out the fact that you live in the Southwest and I in the Northeast? I've answered your questions regarding why the decriminalization in Mexico doesn't help to stop the cartels. Why don't you try and debate my ideas, or is it impossible for you to do so?
PinkyandNoBrain

Phoenix, AZ

#116 Dec 18, 2009
So, here's a list off a document that Joe posted. We know all of these people are crooked as hell, but we don't go after them? WTF? Many live in rich neighborhoods in the USA.

1.) Carlos Hank González, fecha de nacimiento 28/08/27, reside en México. Hank González es la cabeza de la familia y el líder de la organización.
2.) Carlos Hank Rhon, fecha de nacimiento 10/12/47, reside en México. Es el hijo mayor y ha sido designado para operar y controlar la mayoría de los negocios de la familia.
3.) Jorge Hank Rhon, fecha de nacimiento 28/01/56, reside en México. Es el hijo menor que opera y controla los negocios del juego de la familia; por ejemplo, Aqua Caliente Racetrack y Marketing by M.I.R.
4.) Alberto Murguía Orozco. Es el brazo derecho de Jorge Hank Rhon. Sabe cómo son recibidas y distribuidas las ganancias de la droga y cómo son regresadas a los cárteles como ganancias lavadas.
5.) Arturo Alemany Salazar. Esta persona aparece en los documentos de la compañía Marketing by M.I.R., como presidente. Es el portavoz y gerente del negocio.
6.) Edward Mathew Spector. Este sujeto es el propietario de una empresa llamada Spectorvision, la cual recibe y decodifica las señales de satélite de las carreras en Estados Unidos y transmite después a los apostaderos de carreras y deportes tanto de México como de Estados Unidos. Este negocio se localiza en Palomar Oaks Court No. 6349 en la ciudad de Carlsbad, San Diego, Cal. La información que se tiene de este negocio es que el verdadero dueño es Jorge Hank Rhon.
PinkyandNoBrain

Phoenix, AZ

#117 Dec 18, 2009
continued -

7.) Pedro Zaragoza Fuentes. Tiene su residencia en Anchor Blue Cay No. 61, Coronado Cays, San Diego, Cal. Esta casa está a dos puertas de la casa de Jorge Hank Rhon. Pero Zaragoza Fuentes, así como otros miembros de su familia se encuentran fuertemente involucrados con el contrabando de cocaína hacia Estados Unidos. Esta familia es propietaria de Hydro Gas, lo cual es importante pues el 3 de octubre de 1990 uno de sus camiones, que manejaba Rubén Tapia Sánchez, fue detenido en la aduana de Mesa de Otay por contrabando de 3957 kgs. de cocaína.
8.) Alejandro De la Vega Gutiérrez. Documentos oficiales prueban que De la Vega es uno de los muchos hombres cercanos a las órdenes de Jorge Hank Rhon. Aparece como inversionista mayor del Holiday Inn de Tijuana, así como en otros negocios y propiedades. Una fuente de confianza ha indicado que también tiene parte activa en el lavado de las ganancias de la droga para la AFO en Tijuana.
9.) Ramiro Mireles Félix. Es considerado como traficante de drogas clase uno, que invierte dinero de los Arellano Félix junto con Carlos Hank González y Jorge Hank Rhon. También se encuentra en la lista de accionistas del Holiday Inn al lado de otros traficantes de droga.
10.) Gary Gursch Jacobs. Está en la lista del Laredo National Bank como presidente y jefe ejecutivo a cargo. Un examen a fondo de las finanzas de Jacobs revela que está actuando como prestanombres de Carlos Hank Rhon y de la familia Hank en muchas empresas de Estados Unidos. Una fuente ha indicado que Jacobs nunca podría hacer esas enormes ganancias por sí solo. Este es un ejemplo de cómo la familia Hank está obteniendo una sólida base en la economía de Estados Unidos.
11.) Adolfo Rubio González. Es un corredor de bolsa que invierte para miembros de la organización.
12.) Alberto Ángel Abed Schekaiban. Los documentos lo acreditan como el propietario actual de la línea aérea TAESA. Las fuentes han informado que sólo es dueño de nombre. Documentos anteriores y la información pública, dicen que Carlos Hank Rhon es el dueño real de TAESA, pero después del decomiso de cocaína en aviones propiedad de TAESA, se reveló la noticia de que los Hank decidieron distanciarse de la compañía y nombraron a Abed como nuevo presidente y jefe ejecutivo a cargo.
PinkyandNoBrain

Phoenix, AZ

#118 Dec 18, 2009
continued -

13.) Alejandro De la Vega Valladolid. Es el inversionista mayor en el Holiday Inn de Tijuana, México, que realmente es propiedad de Jorge Hank Rhon. También funciona como prestanombres para Jorge y trabaja estrechamente con la organización de los Arellano Félix ayudándoles en el lavado de dinero.
14.) Eduardo Hernández Triana. Trabaja en Aqua Caliente Racetrack así como en Marketing by M.I.R. Parece que está por encima de Arturo Alemany en la operación de M.I.R.
15.) Luis Stavinsky Velazco. Ha sido socio financiero de la familia Hank por mucho tiempo. Están en la lista de socios del Holiday Inn de Tijuana con una inversión de un millón de dólares. Su asociación de negocios con Jorge comenzó hace años cuando su hijo operaba una casa de cambio en Tijuana junto con Jorge Hank Rhon y Pietro LaGreca. Se documentó que esta casa de cambio estaba siendo usada para lavar dinero por varios grandes narcotraficantes.
16.) Paul Karam Kassab. Junto con otros miembros de su familia son co-inversionistas en los negocios y bienes raíces de Carlos Hank González y Carlos Hank Rhon. Su familia y él mismo estuvieron involucrados en el movimiento de casi (50) cincuenta millones de dólares de Carlos Hank González a través de cuentas y que posiblemente terminaron en las cuentas suizas de Raúl Salinas De Gortari. Se dice que están propuestos para recibir los bienes de los Hank.
17.) Carlos Olimón Meraz. Está casado con Ivonne Hank de Olimón, hija de Carlos Hank González. Carlos Olimón tiene un arresto en México por tráfico de drogas. Se cree que tendrá un manejo directivo en conexión con el tráfico de drogas de la organización. También vive en Coronado Cays.
18.) Nicolas Nassif. Es hombre de negocios de Tijuana que trabaja con los Arellano Félix para ayudarles en el lavado de dinero. Nassif está estrechamente asociado con Jorge Hank Rhon.
PinkyandNoBrain

Phoenix, AZ

#119 Dec 18, 2009
somehow, 1-12 were missed -

7.) Pedro Zaragoza Fuentes. Tiene su residencia en Anchor Blue Cay No. 61, Coronado Cays, San Diego, Cal. Esta casa está a dos puertas de la casa de Jorge Hank Rhon. Pero Zaragoza Fuentes, así como otros miembros de su familia se encuentran fuertemente involucrados con el contrabando de cocaína hacia Estados Unidos. Esta familia es propietaria de Hydro Gas, lo cual es importante pues el 3 de octubre de 1990 uno de sus camiones, que manejaba Rubén Tapia Sánchez, fue detenido en la aduana de Mesa de Otay por contrabando de 3957 kgs. de cocaína.
8.) Alejandro De la Vega Gutiérrez. Documentos oficiales prueban que De la Vega es uno de los muchos hombres cercanos a las órdenes de Jorge Hank Rhon. Aparece como inversionista mayor del Holiday Inn de Tijuana, así como en otros negocios y propiedades. Una fuente de confianza ha indicado que también tiene parte activa en el lavado de las ganancias de la droga para la AFO en Tijuana.
9.) Ramiro Mireles Félix. Es considerado como traficante de drogas clase uno, que invierte dinero de los Arellano Félix junto con Carlos Hank González y Jorge Hank Rhon. También se encuentra en la lista de accionistas del Holiday Inn al lado de otros traficantes de droga.
10.) Gary Gursch Jacobs. Está en la lista del Laredo National Bank como presidente y jefe ejecutivo a cargo. Un examen a fondo de las finanzas de Jacobs revela que está actuando como prestanombres de Carlos Hank Rhon y de la familia Hank en muchas empresas de Estados Unidos. Una fuente ha indicado que Jacobs nunca podría hacer esas enormes ganancias por sí solo. Este es un ejemplo de cómo la familia Hank está obteniendo una sólida base en la economía de Estados Unidos.
11.) Adolfo Rubio González. Es un corredor de bolsa que invierte para miembros de la organización.
12.) Alberto Ángel Abed Schekaiban. Los documentos lo acreditan como el propietario actual de la línea aérea TAESA. Las fuentes han informado que sólo es dueño de nombre. Documentos anteriores y la información pública, dicen que Carlos Hank Rhon es el dueño real de TAESA, pero después del decomiso de cocaína en aviones propiedad de TAESA, se reveló la noticia de que los Hank decidieron distanciarse de la compañía y nombraron a Abed como nuevo presidente y jefe ejecutivo a cargo.
MexicanAmerican

Rio Rancho, NM

#120 Dec 18, 2009
proudamericanwoman wrote:
You're right - and we know exactly how to fight them too. We are all too familiar with the Mexican way of life - unlike the Muslim way of life. It is surprising we haven't taken control of their country - maybe it's because too many of our politicians have family ties there? Maybe now that Obama is Muslim, he'll see Mexico as a country we can take control of easily.
<quoted text>
Tell me, what is the mexican way of life, and how you plan on takeing control over mexico. Please I WANT TO HEAR THIS!
hmmmm

United States

#121 Dec 18, 2009
Gunslinger915 wrote:
<quoted text> Well lets see. The Mexicans legalized, decriminalized "personal amounts of marijuana, heroin, Cocaine and meth, a few months ago. What exactly did it get them?? The murder toll is up to more than 2,500. 20 dead in Juarez in LESS than 24 hours. Got two weeks left to make it an even 3,000 for the year. All the Mexican legalization did was fix it so that everybody can have a "personal stash" of whatever they like walking around the streets. The cartels have NOT stopped shooting, killing and they get even more street sales. So what did their "legalization" accomplish?? The cartels are STILL in business and still fighting the government. It's idiots like you that really believe that IF the U.S. would just legalize dope, the cartels would simply fold up, go out of business and even give up the multi-Billion dollar business they have. I know, they will all just go into business making pan dulce and tortillas. So who exactly believes that the cartels will just lay down, will STOP controlling the drug markets and give up their BILLION dollar business? To them "legalizing" just means their is more market, more they can sell without any fear of Law Enforcement. Somebody is going to control the dope, the sales, the market areas, the price, the quality. What if somebody tries to put up a cheaper price, tries to take over another area, buys mota from the "Wrong" supplier? The shooting, murders just going to keep on going or maybe the drug lords will simply walk away and take the losses??
you still havent answered the question, what do you with all your wisdom think we should do? you call me an idiot? what does mexico decriminalizing drugs have to do with the cartels in mexico? not a damn thing, the US is where they get there profits, there big money, and the little amounts that mexico has decriminalized certainly will make no impact in that country,and I still say if you think this US drug war has done any good than your a drug dealer.
PinkyandNoBrain

Phoenix, AZ

#122 Dec 18, 2009
What are we smoking here?
Gunslinger915

El Paso, TX

#123 Dec 18, 2009
benjamin wrote:
<quoted text>Well I may not live on the Mexican border, but I assure you I know more of the cannabis trade then you. If you like the current condition of the Mexican border region and the way the U.S government is handling the problem then by all means continue to believe the false truth about cannabis. I guarantee that legalizing cannabis is the only way that things down your way will get any better. The proof is in history. We have seen improvement ever under current policy. Keep doing what we do and people are going to continue to wind up dead.
Im not sure HOW you would know more about the "drug trade than I do". I have been on this border more than 20 years and you, well you are in Pennsylvania somewhere reading stories and maybe looking up stuff on the internet or maybe you are just making **it up. Just to coinside with your fantasy that legalizing dope in the U.S. will just make life all rosy and nice. No more killing, no more drug wars, no more heads chopped off, street killings, bodies in cement, no Bars, restaurants sprayed with assualt rifles. "Keep doing what WE do and people will continue to wind up dead". What is it that you do, way up there in Pennsylvania to end the drug war, that makes YOU an EXPERT??? I mean besides a mouth to mouth campaign to legalize dope. You are just another person on a personal trip to legalize dope, so that you can just hang out smoke dope, shoot up, whatever and not get arrested. Another person who has a fantasy that the Cartels, the king pins, drug lords, the Mexican Government are simply going to walk away from this multi-BILLION$$$$$$ business and maybe just sell Girl Scout cookies, to support the lives they lead. The "false truth"??? You are talking about YOUR truth, of course?? You used the word "naive". If you really, really believe "your truth", I have some very nice ocean front property, for sale CHEAP, down between Tucson and Nogales, Arizona.
Kathy Daw

El Paso, TX

#124 Dec 18, 2009
benjamin wrote:
<quoted text>So now you want to drop chemicals all over the planet to wipe out plants? Who cares what ill effects all those chemicals will have on the enviroment and people around these drug fields? What is the goal of drug prohibition anyway? I was under the impression that it is to protect the children from the evils of drugs. There is a much better way to protect the children and that is to teach them the truth. Tell your children how you feel about drugs, but include the truth. It may just save their life one day!
I knew it made too much sense.
PinkyandNoBrain

Phoenix, AZ

#125 Dec 18, 2009
One thing that puzzles me a bit. The DEA knows exactly where all the Big Fish live and where they can be found any time of the day. The Mexican gov't seems to know this as well. In addition, there are laundry lists of people who are involved with the drug dealing businesses. We know exactly who they are and where they live. Why aren't we out arresting these clowns?

The truth must lie in that we really don't want to put an end to the drug trade. All we really want is control over the routes and who has that control. Drugs are a big business.

This must be why everyone is in support of Prohibition. Making these things illegal supports lots of functions.

The drug users are happy. The drug dealers make money. The doctors must treat drug patients. Hospitals must be built. Police officers arrest users. Police officers arrest dealers. Customs agents are needed. Border Patrol agents are required. DEA is needed. Nurses are needed. Politicians are needed to sell stories of Wars on Drugs. Prison builders are needed. People who design drug detection devices are needed.

Doesn't this sadly look like economies that are very dependent on drug trade for survival? How many jobs would we have to cut if we LEGALIZED something as simple as Marijuana? It apparently constitutes 85% of the drug import.

There would be very little need for most of the above mentioned occupations. What would this do to the currently high unemployment rates? What would this do to the economy?

You legalize, control, regulate and educate on Marijuana alone, and you basically solve 3/4s of the drug problem.

Sounds pretty simple to me. What am I missing? How is Marijuana different from alcohol or tobacco?

Any educators out there?
lcnative

Fremont, CA

#126 Dec 18, 2009
It's money plain and simple. Politicians make their money by protecting the drug trade - it's a trickle down affect - everyone has an impact at all levels.
PinkyandNoBrain wrote:
One thing that puzzles me a bit. The DEA knows exactly where all the Big Fish live and where they can be found any time of the day. The Mexican gov't seems to know this as well. In addition, there are laundry lists of people who are involved with the drug dealing businesses. We know exactly who they are and where they live. Why aren't we out arresting these clowns?
The truth must lie in that we really don't want to put an end to the drug trade. All we really want is control over the routes and who has that control. Drugs are a big business.
This must be why everyone is in support of Prohibition. Making these things illegal supports lots of functions.
The drug users are happy. The drug dealers make money. The doctors must treat drug patients. Hospitals must be built. Police officers arrest users. Police officers arrest dealers. Customs agents are needed. Border Patrol agents are required. DEA is needed. Nurses are needed. Politicians are needed to sell stories of Wars on Drugs. Prison builders are needed. People who design drug detection devices are needed.
Doesn't this sadly look like economies that are very dependent on drug trade for survival? How many jobs would we have to cut if we LEGALIZED something as simple as Marijuana? It apparently constitutes 85% of the drug import.
There would be very little need for most of the above mentioned occupations. What would this do to the currently high unemployment rates? What would this do to the economy?
You legalize, control, regulate and educate on Marijuana alone, and you basically solve 3/4s of the drug problem.
Sounds pretty simple to me. What am I missing? How is Marijuana different from alcohol or tobacco?
Any educators out there?
Joe

United States

#127 Dec 18, 2009
James Gierach wrote:
<quoted text>
Solution: destroy their business by legalizing drugs. Better for Americans, better for the kids, better for Mexico and honest government.
That would in no way destroy their business. They would only greatly expand it. Look at all the people in Juarez killed in "used car lots", "mechanic shops" -- althought cars are legal, car parts are legal, there's money in stolen vehicles and chop shops. That's why so many have been killed who were involved in those auto theft rings.

How do you believe legalizing drugs in the USA destroys their business? They already control the pot farmers of Mexico, the methamphetamine labs both in Mexico and the USA.

They kill for profits, they kill the competition. Legalizing doesn't change that, doesn't end the greed. Nothing would stop them from killing an American who started to get in the way. Nothing -- because according to you the border cannot be controlled, nor can greed.

If an American began to profit then nothing stops the cartels from offing him - just like they're doing back home in Mexico. The American pothead farmer would be easily eliminated. And just like in Mexico, the entire family could be massacred to send a message to anyone else who might think about competing for this business.

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