Local police still trust in Tasers; others increasingly skeptical o...

Eureka Police Lt. Antonio Zanotti said he can think of a few instances where a Taser saved an officer's life and a suspect's. On one occasion, a man who was suspected of stealing from the Broadway Mall was brandishing a handgun while walking down Broadway. Full Story
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CUERVOBRILLANTE

Spain

#61 Aug 6, 2010
344thBrother wrote:
CuervoBrillante:
Agreed. Especially if the taser is used as a punishment, which seems to be the rule nowadays, it should be illegal to use. Police should be held to the same standard as a citizen when using deadly force. That includes brandishing a firearm, beating or choking with a baton, shooting with rubber coated bullets or bean bag rounds, use of a sap or truncheon, kicking or punching with intent to do great bodily harm, or firing pepper mace into peoples faces.
Just being disobeyed or disrespected is NOT good enough. Police have training in self defense, body armor, and the OPTION to escalate to more brutal forms of compliance. They should be held to a HIGHER standard than citizens. Frankly I'd like to see every citizen who's been punished by police, sue the pants off them, their training officer, the chief and whoever certified the training officer.
I'm not a litigious person but this has gone WAY too far and it needs to stop immediately.
I also admire your use of the terms Jiggery-pokery and faker fakir in the same sentence and you threw in "Slimy semantics!". Kudos on the vernacular!
pftj
d
Thank you!- It's as clear as crystal that the once beautiful and rightly proud USA is currently, as the minutes tick by, becoming the New Nazied States of America. Google these 10 words if you dare, and decide if that assertion is correct:
David Icke message for the uniforms and the dark suits
continue more research

Eureka, CA

#63 Aug 27, 2010
Local police still trust in Tasers; others increasingly skeptical of misuse, point to rare cases of death by Taser
Matt Hawk/For the Times-Standard
Posted: 07/19/2010 01:30:23 AM PDT
Eureka Police Lt. Antonio Zanotti said he can think of a few instances where a Taser saved an officer's life and a suspect's.
On one occasion, a man who was suspected of stealing from the Broadway Mall was brandishing a handgun while walking down Broadway. When officers came into contact with the man, he turned the gun on himself, Zanotti said. The officers had to Taser the man, he said.
”He immediately stiffened up and dropped the gun,” Zanotti said.
While law enforcement officers often see the Taser as a powerful tool in defusing potentially deadly encounters, others -- including various chapters of the American Civil Liberties Union -- have raised questions about its use and whether the risks outweigh the advantages.
On paper, the statistics run in the Taser's favor, according to at least one study.
In 2007, Wake Forest University School of Medicine researchers who reviewed nearly 1,000 Taser incidents reported finding mild or no injuries in 99.75 percent of the cases. Deaths are rare, according to the study.
Two have occurred in recent months, including the June 22 death of Daniel Sylvester in Crescent City and the death of a man near the Mexican border with San Diego in May. How being Tased may have contributed to the men's deaths is still under investigation.
In the Crescent City case, Sylvester eventually stopped resisting arrest enough to be handcuffed after being Tased by Del Norte Sheriff's Office deputies, then
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he began having trouble breathing, according to a statement by the office. Sylvester later died in the Sutter Coast Hospital emergency room. No cause of death has been officially released and a toxicology report is still pending.
Tasers have not led to any deaths in Humboldt County, according to authorities.
Local police said there would be more injuries to officers and suspects if Tasers didn't exist. Eureka Police Sgt. Steve Watson, who has worked for the city for a little over five years, said the gadget is a valuable tool in keeping officers safe.
”A lot of times a situation can be ended quickly (by a Taser) before it turns into a knock-down, drag-out,” Watson said.
Verbena Lea, a member of the Redwood Curtain CopWatch, said Tasers are lethal and should be banned.
”I don't believe that police use Tasers to protect themselves,” she said.“They use them as a form of intimidation and punishment.”
Greg Allen, chair of the Redwood Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, said the Taser issue is complicated. He acknowledges that Tasers can help protect officers and provide a valuable option to brute force, but wonders if the benefits outweigh the risks.
”Even though to most it is 'non-lethal force,' it's obvious that people are dying,” Allen said, adding that officers do have a difficult job when they are forced to make difficult decisions in the face of danger.
The common model used by police in Humboldt County is the X26 made by Taser International, a company located in Scottsdale, Ariz. Corrections officers at the county jail use the M26, a slightly heavier model.
The X26 looks similar to a handgun and can perform as a handheld Taser, or propel two small probes up to 35 feet. The 1,200 volts, 7 watts, and average of 2 milliamperes contained in the shock can penetrate up to two inches of clothing and shut down a person's muscular system, making them immobile.
According to Arcata Police Chief Tom Chapman, Arcata officers have Tased around 17 people in about 2,000 arrests in the past 18 months.
In the same time period, Eureka officers have Tased around 30 suspects in more than 6,000 arrests, Watson said. Brenda Godsey, the public information officer for the Humboldt County Sheriff's Office, said deputies have Tased four people so far this year.
continue more research

Eureka, CA

#64 Aug 27, 2010
It's been over one year since Arcata police Tased Humboldt native John Turney, but the shock still leaves a bad taste in his mouth. The incident took place on the shoulder of the Highway 101 corridor after an APD officer pulled Turney's green Geo over for tailgating.
”He wouldn't talk to me like a human, so I told him I wasn't going to sign the ticket,” Turney said, remembering the altercation.
The officer told Turney if he refused to sign the ticket he would have to go to jail. Not wanting to have his children see him arrested, he steadfastly held to his wheel and refused to step out of the car until he was allowed to phone his wife to pick up the children.
Turney said the officer refused to let him use his phone, and warned him that he would have to use the Taser if Turney didn't get out of the car.
”Before I knew it he was reaching into the car and Tasering the crap out of me,” he said.“It definitely hurt.”
Turney said looking back now, he believes both he and the officer were wrong. In hindsight, Turney said he realizes he should have just signed the ticket, but the incident has changed his view of law enforcement.
Many -- not all -- local officers carry the X26, but can only do so after passing a certified training course that is four to eight hours long. Chapman said his department also requires officers to recertify annually.
All police are taught to use the Taser only when a person becomes violent or physically resistant, officials said. But the officers may also use the device if they feel that someone may become physically violent.“They're definitely not a toy,” Watson said.
The Del Norte County Sheriff's Office, Humboldt County Sheriff's Office and Eureka police also follow the same basic policy.
APD conducts monthly training sessions designed to help officers by presenting different real world situations that they might have to respond to.“You have to keep reinforcing training,” Chapman said.
continue more research

Eureka, CA

#65 Aug 27, 2010
Police follow what is called “Use of force guidelines,” and every department's is slightly different. APD's states that officers will use the minimal amount of force necessary to bring a situation under control.
Like pepper spray, there are a lot of variables involved when using a Taser. Chapman said officers need to give extra consideration to children, women who are pregnant, someone who is already detained or pepper sprayed, someone near a flammable device, and someone who could be hurt by being Tased -- such as a suspect climbing a fence and who might fall.
The Arcata Police Department always completes a review after an officer uses a Taser, Chapman said. The review involves two levels of scrutiny by a supervisor and a manager into an officer's Taser Use Report and the Dataport connected to the Taser. The Humboldt County Sheriff's Office and the Eureka Police Department also download the report from the Dataport.
Chapman said he pays close attention to Taser cases, and is closely following the incident in Crescent City.
According to Lea, more than 400 people have died from Taser-related deaths since its widespread use began in 1999. Many of the deaths involve people who were on illegal substances or suffered from pre-existing heart conditions or mental illness.
Taser International maintains the X26, and other devices like it, save more lives than the devices end, by reducing harm to officers and suspects.
Chapman and Watson agree Tasers are such a powerful tool for officers that just the sight of it coming out of its holster can deter a potentially violent person.“When the Taser comes out, it makes people comply,” Chapman said.
In the first year of use at the Chico Police Department, Tasers brought down the number of injured suspects by 16 percent and the number of injured officers by 51 percent, even though use of force cases increased 53 percent. Numbers were not available for local law enforcement.
Studying injuries related to Taser use, physicians at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine looked at 1,201 uses of a Taser in 962 cases over a 36-month period. Researchers reviewed cases in six locations across the country and found mild or no injuries in 99.75 percent of the incidents.
Allen said he believes that Tasers are a better option for police than nightsticks or guns, but thinks there needs to be more research and training for Tasers to continue to make the positive impacts that the Wake Forest statistics indicate.
”I suppose, when it's all said and done, people would rather be Tased than beaten with a nightstick,” Allen said.“It is very clear, however, that if Tasers are going to be used there needs to be proper training. We also need to find out why certain people are more affected than others.”
344thBrother

United States

#66 Aug 27, 2010
continue more research wrote:
Police follow what is called “Use of force guidelines,” and every department's is slightly different. APD's states that officers will use the minimal amount of force necessary to bring a situation under control.
Like pepper spray, there are a lot of variables involved when using a Taser. Chapman said officers need to give extra consideration to children, women who are pregnant, someone who is already detained or pepper sprayed, someone near a flammable device, and someone who could be hurt by being Tased -- such as a suspect climbing a fence and who might fall.
The Arcata Police Department always completes a review after an officer uses a Taser, Chapman said. The review involves two levels of scrutiny by a supervisor and a manager into an officer's Taser Use Report and the Dataport connected to the Taser. The Humboldt County Sheriff's Office and the Eureka Police Department also download the report from the Dataport.
Chapman said he pays close attention to Taser cases, and is closely following the incident in Crescent City.
According to Lea, more than 400 people have died from Taser-related deaths since its widespread use began in 1999. Many of the deaths involve people who were on illegal substances or suffered from pre-existing heart conditions or mental illness.
Taser International maintains the X26, and other devices like it, save more lives than the devices end, by reducing harm to officers and suspects.
Chapman and Watson agree Tasers are such a powerful tool for officers that just the sight of it coming out of its holster can deter a potentially violent person.“When the Taser comes out, it makes people comply,” Chapman said.
In the first year of use at the Chico Police Department, Tasers brought down the number of injured suspects by 16 percent and the number of injured officers by 51 percent, even though use of force cases increased 53 percent. Numbers were not available for local law enforcement.
Studying injuries related to Taser use, physicians at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine looked at 1,201 uses of a Taser in 962 cases over a 36-month period. Researchers reviewed cases in six locations across the country and found mild or no injuries in 99.75 percent of the incidents.
Allen said he believes that Tasers are a better option for police than nightsticks or guns, but thinks there needs to be more research and training for Tasers to continue to make the positive impacts that the Wake Forest statistics indicate.
”I suppose, when it's all said and done, people would rather be Tased than beaten with a nightstick,” Allen said.“It is very clear, however, that if Tasers are going to be used there needs to be proper training. We also need to find out why certain people are more affected than others.”
Good post lots of information. You obviously took some time on it, Thank you. One issue. The statistical data and analysis on taser deaths may be skewed because Taser Inc. has made it very clear that they will actively pursue legal/civil charges against any medical examiner who mentions "Taser" or electrocution etc. in any death during a tasing incident. So we don't really know how many incidents there have been that resulted in death. I would be interested in any further info you get on the subject. I'm still not convinced that they're safe without significant limits on their use. No multiple deployments, deployment only in life threatening situations, limited mulitiple shocks, adequate training etc...

Keep them coming
p
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344thBrother

United States

#67 Aug 27, 2010
cont.

"Studying injuries related to Taser use, physicians at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine looked at 1,201 uses of a Taser in 962 cases over a 36-month period. Researchers reviewed cases in six locations across the country and found mild or no injuries in 99.75 percent of the incidents."

I'm very suspicious about their data set. Who provided the data? Was it cherry picked? there are 500+ known cases of death occurring during or immediately after taser use so far. Where were those cases in this data set?

p
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344thBrother

United States

#68 Sep 2, 2010
Video

California Cops Taser Senior Citizen in His Own Home
Kurt Nimmo
Infowars.com
September 2, 2010

http://www.infowars.com/california-cops-taser ...

Senior citizen Peter McFarland of Marin County, California, discovered this after he fell down the stairs outside his home last year. On June 29, 2009, McFarland tumbled down the stairs and after his wife called paramedics the cops showed up. They entered McFarland’s home and tasered him because they claimed he was suicidal.

“We want to take you to the hospital for an evaluation, you said if you had a gun, you’d shoot yourself in the head,” a deputy can be heard saying on a video of the incident captured on a taser mounted camera. McFarland said the comment was hyperbole made because he was in pain.

“Stand up, put your hands behind your back or you’re going to be tased,” the deputy commanded. McFarland refused, told the police in no uncertain terms to get out of his house, so the cop tased him not once, but three times, as his wife looked on in horror and pleaded with the cops to stop because her husband has a heart condition.

McFarland’s lawyer, John Scott, said the cops did not have a search warrant or any reason to enter the McFarland residence. Scott told KGO-TV in San Francisco his client was arrested, jailed and charged with resisting arrest. A judge later dismissed the charge. McFarland has filed suit against the Marin County Sheriff’s Department.
annoyinMiss

Brookings, OR

#69 Sep 16, 2012
I know of two big strong men who were tazered and it killed them
and they had to bring them back to life and they tazed them again and killed them and brought them back to life,

,these men did resist arrest,
and the tazers killed them several times while they were being arrested,but they were brought back to life and put in jail

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